Lager Fermentation Process

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Davtar01

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Hi,

I'm just about to brew my first all grain lager. I've been researching the fermentation process. This is what I plan to do,
1. Ferment for 2-3 weeks at 15 degrees C ( I have a temp controlled fridge)
2. diacetyl rest 2-3 days (18-20 degrees)
3. Crash temp to 3 degrees and leave for 6 weeks before kegging

Do you think this looks right? Any tips or thoughts.

Also, I plan to ferment in a plastic bucket, do you think I need to change to a different bucket between stages i.e. at diacetyl rest or should I just keep in the same bucket all the way through until kegging?
 

MrRook

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Hi,

I'm just about to brew my first all grain lager. I've been researching the fermentation process. This is what I plan to do,
1. Ferment for 2-3 weeks at 15 degrees C ( I have a temp controlled fridge)
2. diacetyl rest 2-3 days (18-20 degrees)
3. Crash temp to 3 degrees and leave for 6 weeks before kegging

Do you think this looks right? Any tips or thoughts.

Also, I plan to ferment in a plastic bucket, do you think I need to change to a different bucket between stages i.e. at diacetyl rest or should I just keep in the same bucket all the way through until kegging?
1. At 15 you'll probably be done sooner. Go by the gravity.
2. Depending on the yeast a d-rest may not be necessary. I've never needed one.
3. You can keg first, then cold crash.
The more times you change buckets the more times you have to introduce oxygen or something that can cause spoilage.
 

Paul7189

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I've just brewed a pilsner and it was
10°C for 10 days.
20°C for 3 days for D-rest and to ensure fermentation is complete.
Crash at 2°C for 24 hours before adding gelatin.
Leave at 2°C to fully clear for another 2 days then transfer into a keg.
Cold condition around 2-4°C for 4 weeks under CO2 presure to carbonate at the same time.

So its on the yeast for 16 days and then conditioning in a keg but should remain pretty sediment free.
 

DocAnna

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Good guidance here Lager Method
A lot depends of the yeast used and what you are looking to get out of it. I've just moved a pilsner from 2 weeks at 10 deg to 15 to 16 deg which I'll leave at for 3 days or so before cold crashing to zero deg which I will leave it at for a couple of weeks at least. This is quite slow and is closer to the traditional method that the fast one. I don't use finings but instead will use time and cold which I find works, similar to @Paul7189 but without to the finings.

Anna
 

Paul7189

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Good guidance here Lager Method
A lot depends of the yeast used and what you are looking to get out of it. I've just moved a pilsner from 2 weeks at 10 deg to 15 to 16 deg which I'll leave at for 3 days or so before cold crashing to zero deg which I will leave it at for a couple of weeks at least. This is quite slow and is closer to the traditional method that the fast one. I don't use finings but instead will use time and cold which I find works, similar to @Paul7189 but without to the finings.

Anna
I find even without the finings the beer comes out very clear. It was more just to try to remove the chill haze I usually get with almost all of my home brews.
 

Davtar01

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I've just brewed a pilsner and it was
10°C for 10 days.
20°C for 3 days for D-rest and to ensure fermentation is complete.
Crash at 2°C for 24 hours before adding gelatin.
Leave at 2°C to fully clear for another 2 days then transfer into a keg.
Cold condition around 2-4°C for 4 weeks under CO2 presure to carbonate at the same time.

So its on the yeast for 16 days and then conditioning in a keg but should remain pretty sediment free.
Thanks that is useful, what is the gelatin for? What do you use to determine the initial 10 days? Is it OG?
 

Paul7189

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Thanks that is useful, what is the gelatin for? What do you use to determine the initial 10 days? Is it OG?
Gelatin is used to clear up beer. It binds all of the proteins and yeast etc in the beer together and then when you cool it right down then it all falls out of suspension. There’s loads online about clearing beer up with gelatin. The 10 days is just from it going into the fermentation fridge for me.
 

Davtar01

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Gelatin is used to clear up beer. It binds all of the proteins and yeast etc in the beer together and then when you cool it right down then it all falls out of suspension. There’s loads online about clearing beer up with gelatin. The 10 days is just from it going into the fermentation fridge for me.
Thanks @Paul7189 I have been using Irish moss in the boil but will take a look at gelatin.
 

Paul7189

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Or buy MJ california lager yeast and ferment at about 19 for two weeks then bottle.
Ill be doing a lager or two for the summer so I'll try to do two batches, one the normal way and ill do one with this and report back!
 

Griff097

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Or buy MJ california lager yeast and ferment at about 19 for two weeks then bottle.
Not heard that before Clint, funnily enough I am doing a lager tomorrow and just ordered MJ yeast.
I remember reading a shortened lagering process, but never a straight 19 degrees.
 
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Not heard that before Clint, funnily enough I am doing a lager tomorrow and just ordered MJ yeast.
I remember reading a shortened lagering process, but never a straight 19 degrees.
M54 really works I used on a Modelo which took 5 days to ferment. Not that clear so cold crashing for 4 days now clear so will bottle tomorrow.
 
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Great thread!! I have been plucking up the courage to attempt a lager. In the 6 or 7 years I have been brewing I have never tried to make a lager. This thread has persuaded me to give it a go. Now to think through how I want it to taste.....
 

Paul7189

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I would go for something simple like a smash. I usually try pilsner and saaz and go for a Czech style. That way is good for getting your cold side of the brewing process dialed in before experimenting with the malts and hop profile.
 

Griff097

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Great thread!! I have been plucking up the courage to attempt a lager. In the 6 or 7 years I have been brewing I have never tried to make a lager. This thread has persuaded me to give it a go. Now to think through how I want it to taste.....
That's exactly what I am doing today, Pilzener Citra Smash.
I don't often do Lagers because of the time in the fridge, but will try this one at 19 degrees and see how it works out.
 

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