Lager Fermentation Process

Help Support The HomeBrew Forum:

Paul7189

Regular.
Joined
Jan 4, 2022
Messages
213
Reaction score
170
Location
North West
That's exactly what I am doing today, Pilzener Citra Smash.
I don't often do Lagers because of the time in the fridge, but will try this one at 19 degrees and see how it works out.
Will be interesting to see how a Citra pilsner turns out when fermenter at 19°C!
 

DocAnna

Scottish Brewster
Joined
Aug 24, 2020
Messages
1,297
Reaction score
2,465
Location
Scotland
That's exactly what I am doing today, Pilzener Citra Smash.
I don't often do Lagers because of the time in the fridge, but will try this one at 19 degrees and see how it works out.
Just to add that this is a great time of year to do lagers, especially in Scotland, as I can put them out in the back shed to lager at ambient friggin freezing outside temperature and forget about them for a few weeks.
 
Joined
Jan 11, 2016
Messages
416
Reaction score
391
Location
NULL
Just to add that this is a great time of year to do lagers, especially in Scotland, as I can put them out in the back shed to lager at ambient friggin freezing outside temperature and forget about them for a few weeks.
I like this approach. I had been thinking of lagering mine in the shed at the bottom of the garden
 

Cheyne_brewer

Regular.
Joined
Oct 16, 2019
Messages
330
Reaction score
185
Location
Bilsthorpe, Notts. UK
I’ve done 3 lagers (excluding extract kits) to date, 2 x Worcester Hop Shop Bohemian Pilsner and their Kolsch. Supposedly made for my wife who won’t touch “proper beer”. First one by the book - 34/70 at 12c, the others at 20c under pressure. No discernible difference in quality and they were a quantum leap in quality over a kit. I don’t drink lager, more an ale man, but my own brews are so drinkable my wife hasn’t got near them 🤣
 

Griff097

Chief Charwalla
Joined
Sep 22, 2017
Messages
479
Reaction score
562
Location
Cardiff
Will be interesting to see how a Citra pilsner turns out when fermenter at 19°C!
Well it's going to be more interesting now as the inkbird sensor fell off the FV and it got to 27 degrees overc24 hrs before I knew about it, so it's going to be hard to discern between how it turned out and and off flavours from the strained yeast.
 

Paul7189

Regular.
Joined
Jan 4, 2022
Messages
213
Reaction score
170
Location
North West
Well it's going to be more interesting now as the inkbird sensor fell off the FV and it got to 27 degrees overc24 hrs before I knew about it, so it's going to be hard to discern between how it turned out and and off flavours from the strained yeast.
At least it won’t taste of diacetyl 😂
 
Joined
Jan 11, 2016
Messages
416
Reaction score
391
Location
NULL
Starting to put together a lager recipe. I am thinking of going for an easy drinking Czech Pilsner, 4-5%, and Saaz hopped.

I have just listened to an excellent podcast on Czech lagers on beersmith (#113) and would be interested in thoughts around the mash process. There was a lot of discussion around the need for a decoction mash with the Pilsner style - which looks dreadfully difficult to achieve with my basic 3 vessel set up. For my first attempt I don't want to overcomplicate with new process so want to just stick with a simple infusion mash. I see a couple of options here.

1) just mash at 67-69 C. It'll be fine as modern bohemian pilsner malts are well modified.

Or

2). Chuck in some melanoidin malt (2-3% of the grain bill) to simulate the effect and get some of those flavours that a decoction will bring.

Or even

4). You really need to decoction mash so do it.
 
Joined
Apr 8, 2019
Messages
1,783
Reaction score
1,724
Location
Essex
Starting to put together a lager recipe. I am thinking of going for an easy drinking Czech Pilsner, 4-5%, and Saaz hopped.

I have just listened to an excellent podcast on Czech lagers on beersmith (#113) and would be interested in thoughts around the mash process. There was a lot of discussion around the need for a decoction mash with the Pilsner style - which looks dreadfully difficult to achieve with my basic 3 vessel set up. For my first attempt I don't want to overcomplicate with new process so want to just stick with a simple infusion mash. I see a couple of options here.

1) just mash at 67-69 C. It'll be fine as modern bohemian pilsner malts are well modified.

Or

2). Chuck in some melanoidin malt (2-3% of the grain bill) to simulate the effect and get some of those flavours that a decoction will bring.

Or even

4). You really need to decoction mash so do it.

This award winning Pilsner Urquell clone recipe has an option listed as an alternative to the decoction mash:

 
Last edited:

Latest posts

Top