Lallemand Danstar London ESB - anyone tried yet?

Discussion in 'Grain, Hops, Yeast & Water' started by Llamaman, Jun 10, 2018.

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  1. Jun 10, 2018 #1

    Llamaman

    Llamaman

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    I'm planning on a Fullers ESB clone and assumed I'd have to buy a liquid yeast or harvest from a Fullers bottle-conditioned beer, but then came across this.
    It apparently even comes with an endorsement from John Keeling himself!

    Anyone tried this? Is Fuller's yeast in convenient dry form at less than half the price of liquid too good to be true?
     
  2. Jun 10, 2018 #2

    Llamaman

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  3. Jun 10, 2018 #3

    MyQul

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  4. Jun 10, 2018 #4

    peebee

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    'Taint new. They resurrected their old "London" yeast, which I did try decades ago but seemed to prefer the "Windsor" and "Manchester" (latter defunct - perhaps it will be resurrected too?). But that seems to be personal preference (prejudice? Naff southern muck.) as I don't think much to the flavour (lack of) of WLP002 liquid yeast either which is reputed to be the equivalent.

    I'm hoping for better luck with the "Yorkshire" yeast (Wyeast 1469). Bizarre behaviour (very top fermenting), but then the "Fullers" yeast does create cottage cheese-like flocs which is fairly bizarre too - I can't remember the "London" dried yeast doing this.

    (EDIT: Reading through the link posted by "MyQul" - No the dried "London ESB" does not form the flocs, nor does it drop out as enthusiastically as WLP002, so is the reputed same source for these yeasts really true? Does mention the yeast tends to finish high (c.1.020) but I don't back that up.)
     
    Last edited: Jun 10, 2018
  5. Jun 10, 2018 #5

    Llamaman

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    So generally not considered very good then. Shame.
    I'll try to harvest some from Bengal Lancer and 1845 (I think Golden Pride will be a bit alcohol stressed!)

    I see Fullers have also now released an unfiltered London Pride in cans - I wonder if it's also can conditioned?
     
  6. Jun 10, 2018 #6

    Gunge

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    I tried it just the once a couple of years ago. It was like Windsor on a very bad-tempered day.
     
  7. Jun 10, 2018 #7

    peebee

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    Not my words, London ESB yeast does get good reviews. I just have a preference for something a bit less subtle.

    I'm not convinced 1845 uses the same yeast as Fuller's other brews? I was having much success brewing 1845 clones using S-33 dried yeast (that really does finish high - about 1.020) but last year switched to WLP002 yeast (reputedly Fuller's) and it finished at 1.013 and was nowhere near as good.
     
  8. Jun 10, 2018 #8

    Sadfield

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    I'm going to be pitching some later today into a low alcohol beer (0.5%) so the reports of low attenuation are music to my ears, hope it finishes high. I think this yeast is quite popular with NEIPA brewers for its fruity flavour and low attenuating properties without muting hops.
     
  9. Jun 11, 2018 #9

    peebee

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    "Low alcohol beer..."; that's scared everyone off!

    Never crossed my mind to try the "London ESB" yeast for my low-alcohol offerings. I've got "Windsor" earmarked for my next attempt, but can change that, as my "Nanny State" clone is getting a bit low now. Tell me how you get on; anything's got to be better than that murky US-05 stuff. I'll be trying for something along the lines of "Big Drop Brewing Co.'s" "Pale Ale" - the "Nanny State" has only reminded me how bad the older US hops are (the 4 "C"s, I've had to re-learn why American's serve their beer's at such frigid temperatures, this "Nanny State" improved no-end when I chilled it down to 5C).
     
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  10. Jun 11, 2018 #10

    Sadfield

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    Windsor would be a very good option, I imagine. I was surprised that BD recommend an american Ale yeast, too clean and attenuating. I used WLP028 Scottish yeast last time, which worked quite well, but think dry yeast is easier to judge the small pitch needed.

    Really want to try the Big Drop beers as I'm not a fan of Nanny State, although more for the odd roastiness from the Amber and Chocolate than C hops. My last brew had Bobek, Wai-iti and Riwaka in it, all low alpha hops to maximise flavour over bitterness throughout the boil, but I've actually added some C-hops to this one at flame out and will do a dry hop too (Citra, Cascade), too lift the aroma. Only because I want to do a Session IPA that is so low.

    I'll be looking at other ways to add flavour, other than hops in the next one. I see Big Drop use limes in the Pale.
     
  11. Jun 12, 2018 at 7:59 PM #11

    Sadfield

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    Had a thought on this today, that a very flocculant yeast may need some extra attention. As there is not much work to be done consuming sugar that there could be a risk of the yeast dropping out before its done cleaning up things like diacetyl.
     
  12. Jun 13, 2018 at 8:20 AM #12

    peebee

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    I wouldn't give it a thought, as you said not much sugar, and by the same argument not a significant amount of anything else either.

    That list of NZ hops you posted earlier looks interesting. I'll add them to my thoughts of the next low-alcohol beer. Wai-iti even mentions hints of lime for consideration in Big Drop pale ale clone (the limes aren't an obvious feature in Big Drop's pale anyway - good, I wouldn't want it to be the case).
     
  13. Jun 13, 2018 at 10:08 AM #13

    peebee

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    'Twasn't why I used dried yeast. I chose it for the reputed "built ready to go" feature. So added a whole packet to a 20L keg (skipped the fermenter bit) and didn't aerate. Worked fine, but US-05 yeast and "flocculant" can't be used in the same sentence, hence I'll use "Windsor" or this "London ESB" yeast next time..
     

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