LARGER OR LAGER

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chthon

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I found out Britains were using soccer before football and fall before autumn. Am I going to stop sneering at Americans for doing it 'wrongly'? Hell no, I love my prejudices.
Puts on "Fall Leaves" by Miles Davis...
 

Slid

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I don't get Soccer, Football (no hands) explains it perfectly how did the word soccer become the term used.
I've always understood "soccer" to be a derivative from "association".

I quite like the fact that Hull Football Club plays Rugby League, as it was a RL club that first used the name. Elsewhere "Football Club" generally means an Association Football club.
 

PhilBrew

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Hi Chippy
I don't get Soccer, Football (no hands) explains it perfectly how did the word soccer become the term used.
... I believe it comes from the times when there were two popular football based games being played and rapidly forming clubs to give industrial workers something to do in their little time off ... As-soc-iation Football clubs and Rug-by Football clubs, came to be known as "soccer" and "rugger" clubs respectively :?:

Bear in mind, although the "no hands" test would suggest Rugby isn't really a football game, back in the day the only way to score was to kick the (odd-shaped) ball over the bar, between the posts (a goal) ... a "try" back then would only gain you the attempt (try) at kicking for a goal :?:

Cheers, PhilB
 

MickDundee

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I've always understood "soccer" to be a derivative from "association".

I quite like the fact that Hull Football Club plays Rugby League, as it was a RL club that first used the name. Elsewhere "Football Club" generally means an Association Football club.
Back when I was doing my accountancy training, I was on audit at a distillery in rural Scotland with our Australian secondee and he was desperate to find somewhere to watch the “footy”. He meant rugby league.
 

Cheshire Cat

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Read Made in America by Bill Bryson about how the language was taken there in the 17th century and it is purer English than ours. Forget the stupid spellings though.
 

Duxuk

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I know that when the Pilgrim Fathers sailed to America in 1620, the term for the third season was fall, for obvious reasons. Later in the seventeenth century we acquired the term autumn from the French and it stuck in Britain. The American accent is rhotic, that is they pronounce their "R"s. This was more common in England back then but in much of the country has fallen out of favour. A west country accent is often rhotic, as is an East Lancashire. Most of us non rhotics say "car park" as "caa paak" but if you imagine how an American would pronounce it, you'll get the idea.
 

GerritT

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Isn't lager called lager because it was left in store to age for a while, in a lager - which is the German for warehouse; i.e. it was/is lager-beer, meaning beer stored in a warehouse.
Thus if it was a big warehouse one could have larger lager beer. If a rival company then made an even bigger warehouse, the rival could claim to be producing a larger larger lager.
Or something like that.
The nest of a hare is called a "leger" in the Netherlands, connected to 'lagomorph'. Think 'lair'. Lager is more 'storage' than 'warehouse'.
 

DavidDetroit

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ARGER (adjective) means greater or bigger than
LAGER (noun) is a type of beer usually fermented and conditioned at low temperature often with a bottom fermenting lager yeast, and frequently discussed on this Forum.
What did you see that brought this about?
 

chthon

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I know that when the Pilgrim Fathers sailed to America in 1620, the term for the third season was fall, for obvious reasons. Later in the seventeenth century we acquired the term autumn from the French and it stuck in Britain. The American accent is rhotic, that is they pronounce their "R"s. This was more common in England back then but in much of the country has fallen out of favour. A west country accent is often rhotic, as is an East Lancashire. Most of us non rhotics say "car park" as "caa paak" but if you imagine how an American would pronounce it, you'll get the idea.
Interesting. I am currently reading the first works of P.G. Wodehouse, and the local town dialects also add 'r' on places where you don't expect them, like "darg" for dog.
 

Grealish

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I know that when the Pilgrim Fathers sailed to America in 1620, the term for the third season was fall, for obvious reasons. Later in the seventeenth century we acquired the term autumn from the French and it stuck in Britain. The American accent is rhotic, that is they pronounce their "R"s. This was more common in England back then but in much of the country has fallen out of favour. A west country accent is often rhotic, as is an East Lancashire. Most of us non rhotics say "car park" as "caa paak" but if you imagine how an American would pronounce it, you'll get the idea.
And we've forgotten that we used to say 'gotten' for 'got'.
 

terrym

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If we spelled words the way we say them, written words would be mostly unintellegible to all but those who wrote them. That's why usually we have a common understanding of how things are spelt 'correctly' although that may slowly evolve, and typically as far as 'English' is concerned there are a few international differences. What the OP was all about was highlighting a common mis-spelling of a word that is of some significance on our forum. That said I have even seen 'lager' printed as 'larger' on a leading commercial brewer's website much to my surprise. Yo cudna mek it up.
 

Rodj

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A west country accent is often rhotic, as is an East Lancashire. Most of us non rhotics say "car park" as "caa paak"
Thanks for that explanation. Now I know why most of the UK population, with the notable exception of we East Lancastrians who have emigrated to Cornwall, don't speak proper English.
 

foxy

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I loved this TV series, explains a lot, there was also one about mathematics, that was in real strife before someone, I believe to be an Indian astronomer came up with a zero.
 
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