MASH ph

Discussion in 'General Home Brew Equipment Discussion' started by Justin Dean, Nov 14, 2019.

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  1. Nov 14, 2019 #1

    Justin Dean

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    What do you use to measure your mash ph? I.e. once you have stirred grain in.
     
  2. Nov 14, 2019 #2

    An Ankoù

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    Me. Nothing..
    If it's dark the mash pH will take care of itself. If it's light then a bit of Acid Malt or dilute phosphoric acid.
    Most of all, it depends on your water profile. -HCO3 can be troublesome.
    You sort of learn to live with your water, since you're stuck with it. Adjusting for different styles is a matter of experience. When I lived in Poole, I used rainwater to make Pilsners. Here I have to add salts to get a decent bitter.

     
    Last edited: Nov 15, 2019
  3. Nov 14, 2019 #3

    Oneflewover

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    I don't bother either. I'm getting good, reliable, efficiency these days after sorting my processes out so I take the view that it must be ok!
     
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  4. Nov 14, 2019 #4

    Justin Dean

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    Sure I am the same but am curious on checking from time to time. The ph will vary from beer to beer depending on the grain bill. It is a simple way of a quality improvement.
     
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  5. Nov 14, 2019 #5

    Hoddy

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    Ph meter. Draw off some wort mid mash and test. If your single infusion in a cooler etc then you can’t really do anything about it. But you will know to add more acid for next time. Like say, knowing helps for next time.
     
  6. Nov 15, 2019 #6

    Clint

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    I use those pH strips...I'm not that into the clever side of things doing only very basic water treatment as per StrangeSteve's thread on water...things seem to be ok. My efficiency was consistently in the mid to high 60's but has improved since I got rid of the bazooka filter in the tun and made a manifold.
     
  7. Nov 15, 2019 #7

    strange-steve

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  8. Nov 15, 2019 #8

    Markk

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  9. Nov 15, 2019 #9

    Justin Dean

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  10. Nov 15, 2019 #10

    samale

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    I just ordered one out of interest just to see what I get. I don't make much water adjustment. I add some acid malt for pales and IPA
     
  11. Nov 15, 2019 #11

    strange-steve

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    I haven't found that, mine has been going fine for many years. You're not putting it into the hot wort are you?
     
  12. Nov 15, 2019 #12

    Markk

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    So glad you you said that. That's what I would have done!! At the risk of sounding even more stupid, can you share how you do it please?
     
  13. Nov 15, 2019 #13

    cheeseyfeet

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    Here’s a can of worms ...

    How do you take your reading? Draw a sample and cool it to 20c or just test at mash temp?

    I’ve tried both using a fairly expensive meter and always had readings that look far too low.

    By the time a sample has cooled I’m thinking it’s too late to correct the mash anyway?

    To be honest my beer hasn’t improved since acidifying the mash so I didn’t bother for the last brew!
     
  14. Nov 15, 2019 #14

    Argentum

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    pH readings taken at mash temperature (~65-70 degrees C.) will be about 0.3 pH points (0.25 to 0.35 points difference depending upon whom you believe) lower than if you cool the sample down to ~20 degrees C. If you are targeting 5.6 pH at room temperature, and you see ~5.3 pH at mash temperature (or visa-versa) you are there. Then it is wise to measure and acid adjust (if/as needed) a second time just prior to boiling in order to be at ~5.1-5.2 pH at that juncture, with this latter reading/adjustment/reading regimen being done at ~ 20 degrees C. You want post boil and cooling pH to be 5.0 to 5.2 leading into fermentation.
     
  15. Nov 15, 2019 #15

    strange-steve

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    @Markk About 10-15 mins after dough-in take a small sample of the wort in a glass or something, chill it quickly (I put it into the freezer) and test it at about 20-25°c.

    Putting the meter straight into hot wort will shorten the life of the probe and give you a false reading (technically the reading is correct as pH drops as temperature increases but the commonly suggested mash range is as measured at room temperature).
     
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  16. Nov 15, 2019 #16

    Markk

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    Gotcha, thanks
     
  17. Nov 15, 2019 #17

    strange-steve

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    It's very possible you don't need to acidify your water depending on the alkalinity, calcium, grist etc. The fact that your pH readings looked too low suggests that you're over-acidifying.
     
  18. Nov 15, 2019 #18

    Jakeyboi

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    Why is the p.h of the mash important?
     
  19. Nov 15, 2019 #19

    strange-steve

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    There are many benefits to a correct mash pH, here are some of them from Braukaiser:
     
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