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Rodcx500z

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Dear OB some good news, when i had my aorta fixed in 2018 the meeting with surgeon went along the lines off, he tells you all the things you could die from during and post op and any questions you may have i asked what are the alternatives reply death within 3 months, the very last thing he tells you is the area we are working in is right next to the nerve that works your manhood ashock1 and it may not work again, the good news is Mr Graham Riding did a top job and all is well i hope this gives hope to all who needs this doing in the futher athumb..
 

Obadiah Boondoggle

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Dear OB some good news, when i had my aorta fixed in 2018 the meeting with surgeon went along the lines off, he tells you all the things you could die from during and post op and any questions you may have i asked what are the alternatives reply death within 3 months, the very last thing he tells you is the area we are working in is right next to the nerve that works your manhood ashock1 and it may not work again, the good news is Mr Graham Riding did a top job and all is well i hope this gives hope to all who needs this doing in the futher athumb..
Thank you R

This is such a heart warming story of hope for everyone

I guess it can be hard though explaining it to others and maybe you are prone to stiffness on a morning?

Do keep up the good work

Is Graham Riding your barber?
 

The-Engineer-That-Brews

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Because apparently they used to perform operations:

Why are barber poles red, white and blue?
The barber pole’s colors are a legacy of a (thankfully) long-gone era when people went to barbers not just for a haircut or shave but also for bloodletting and other medical procedures. During the Middle Ages bloodletting, which involves cutting open a vein and allowing blood to drain, was a common treatment for a wide range of maladies, from sore throat to plague. Monks, who often cared for the sick, performed the procedure, and barbers, given their skill with sharp instruments, sometimes provided assistance. After Pope Alexander III in 1163 prohibited clergymen from carrying out the procedure, barbers added bloodletting—something physicians of the day considered necessary but too menial to do themselves–to their repertoires. Known as barber-surgeons, they also took on such tasks as pulling teeth, setting bones and treating wounds. Ambroise Pare, a 16th-century Frenchman considered the father of modern surgery, started his career as a barber-surgeon.
The look of the barber pole is linked to bloodletting, with red representing blood and white representing the bandages used to stem the bleeding. The pole itself is said to symbolize the stick that a patient squeezed to make the veins in his arm stand out more prominently for the procedure. In Europe, barber poles traditionally are red and white, while in America, the poles are red, white and blue. One theory holds that blue is symbolic of the veins cut during bloodletting, while another interpretation suggests blue was added to the pole as a show of patriotism and a nod to the nation’s flag.
 

Obadiah Boondoggle

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Because apparently they used to perform operations:

Why are barber poles red, white and blue?
The barber pole’s colors are a legacy of a (thankfully) long-gone era when people went to barbers not just for a haircut or shave but also for bloodletting and other medical procedures. During the Middle Ages bloodletting, which involves cutting open a vein and allowing blood to drain, was a common treatment for a wide range of maladies, from sore throat to plague. Monks, who often cared for the sick, performed the procedure, and barbers, given their skill with sharp instruments, sometimes provided assistance. After Pope Alexander III in 1163 prohibited clergymen from carrying out the procedure, barbers added bloodletting—something physicians of the day considered necessary but too menial to do themselves–to their repertoires. Known as barber-surgeons, they also took on such tasks as pulling teeth, setting bones and treating wounds. Ambroise Pare, a 16th-century Frenchman considered the father of modern surgery, started his career as a barber-surgeon.
The look of the barber pole is linked to bloodletting, with red representing blood and white representing the bandages used to stem the bleeding. The pole itself is said to symbolize the stick that a patient squeezed to make the veins in his arm stand out more prominently for the procedure. In Europe, barber poles traditionally are red and white, while in America, the poles are red, white and blue. One theory holds that blue is symbolic of the veins cut during bloodletting, while another interpretation suggests blue was added to the pole as a show of patriotism and a nod to the nation’s flag.
Sounds like Graham Riding was one of these barbers
 

Mr_S_Jerusalem

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When I was younger I went to a barber. I was in the chair for a while with my feet casually dangling over the edge and staring into space while they cut my hair.
When I got off the chair my feet hit the floor and I had absolutely no feeling in them whatsoever. I literally fell off the chair and hit the floor on my knees, and being only about 12 at the time started crying.
My dad started laughing, rolled his eyes and picked my up, sat me on a nearby stool and said what’s the matter? I said I can’t feel my feet. I was scared of course, I thought there was something badly wrong with me.
He laughed again and grabbed my foot and slapped it til the circulation came back and told me I was fine and not to be so silly.

Funny how vividly we remember some things isn’t it?
 

The-Engineer-That-Brews

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When I was younger I went to a barber. I was in the chair for a while with my feet casually dangling over the edge and staring into space while they cut my hair.
When I got off the chair my feet hit the floor and I had absolutely no feeling in them whatsoever. I literally fell off the chair and hit the floor on my knees, and being only about 12 at the time started crying.
My dad started laughing, rolled his eyes and picked my up, sat me on a nearby stool and said what’s the matter? I said I can’t feel my feet. I was scared of course, I thought there was something badly wrong with me.
He laughed again and grabbed my foot and slapped it til the circulation came back and told me I was fine and not to be so silly.

Funny how vividly we remember some things isn’t it?
Lovely story
 

HSD

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Removing a loofah from a ferret is a very delicate matter HSD or may I call you H?

Is the ferret male or female or does it decline to answer that question?
You may certainly not, even Nanny had to call me HSD and she lived in the cellar for generations, but then she never got over losing the war.

Removal of loofah went rather well, in these non gender specific times I wouldn’t dare to ask for fear of being cancelled by the ferret controlled mass media. One of them is from Wigan if that helps? one isn’t moving very much anymore.

blood group now 12:18 to StAustell last time I was in Devon
 
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