One-way ticket to Rwanda for some UK asylum seekers

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As an independent Consultant, I mostly worked from home and quite often put in 16 hours a day.

This is how I managed to bill Clients with over 320 working days in one particular year; and still managed to have most weekends off and a couple of holidays in France!

Many times I would wake SWMBO at 5am and ask her to wake me up before she went to work, because I had a Client Meeting in Aberdeen that morning - 35 miles away!

At the end of the year I ran out of jobs and relaxed! My life consisted of letting the dogs out, throwing another log on the fire and drinking whisky! Pure heaven!

After only THREE days of bliss, SWMBO said “No work doesn’t mean that you can laze around the house all day!” and life suddenly stopped being heaven!
:hat:
 
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Political awareness is country specific. Scotland and Northern Ireland are very politically aware. Not so England. I don't know about Wales as there is little coverage of Welsh politics. Still can't believe they voted in Boris, or passed Brexit.

For 10 years under a Tory government I had 0% wage rises, (public sector pay freeze and austerity measures) three years ago I got 1%, 2 years ago 3% this year 2% so in the last 13 years this public servant has had his pay go up by 6%. In the private sector (in my field) salaries have went up 33%. On average for my skills the pay difference between public and private sectors is £35,000 pa. This is why we find it harder and harder to keep a hold of staff and have to outsource. (Privatisation via the back door)

By the way when every one was on furlough doing up there houses and gardens, taking up hobbies, Me and the Mrs were knocking out 10 hour shifts 7 days a week just to keep services afloat for no extra pay. What thanks or recognition? Bugger all.

I expect the next card the Torys will play will be Bash the Unions, followed by a war with some small country miles away (not Russia)

Then everyone can wave Union Flags, sing land of hope and glory and vote Tory again.

Its what they did when thatcher's government was in trouble.

Sad but true, history will repeat itself.
I agree with some of what you say, but take issue with your imo naive reference to the Falklands War. The islands are British territory that had been invaded by a quasi fascist military regime who had no qualms about murdering anyone who stood upto them, even drugging dissidents and throwing them out of planes into the sea, it played well for Thatchers govt politically not so well for those who died, but that’s the job you sign up for in the forces you know the risks, the overwhelming democratic decision of the people of the Falklands to remain within the UK by referendum says enough for me.
 
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What complete twaddle I was a manager and director for many years at Coke, Heinz and Nestle and recruited the best people some a lot more clever and knowledgable than me because you want results. Management is not about knowing all or pinching other peoples ideas it’s about leadership, something we seem to have lost in the once great country.
Absolutely. If you're the boss and you're the smartest guy in the room, you have the wrong team.
 

Kerby

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Does private schooling really benefit a student? It won't improve the IQ, the cunning or leadership of an individual. Leaders aren't taught they are born, unfortunately not enough.
Utter garbage. The staffing, ratios and resources of even a mediocre private school massively advantages its pupils. The less able, often overlooked in a state system are given enough attention and support to usually achieve at least mediocre results and the able have an increased opportunity to achieve excellence.
Leadership is largely learnt and the massive injection of self belief instilled into kids at elite private schools, coupled with the fact that they’re mixing with future CEOs, Politicians, and Religious Leaders doesn’t hurt. Historically the attitude at places like Eton and Harrow was “I was captain of the first eleven, of course I can be governor of India”.
 

Clint

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I have actually heard a personell director say that they would definitely choose a candidate on the university they attended...as they would "obviously be better"...
 
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Utter garbage. The staffing, ratios and resources of even a mediocre private school massively advantages its pupils. The less able, often overlooked in a state system are given enough attention and support to usually achieve at least mediocre results and the able have an increased opportunity to achieve excellence.
Leadership is largely learnt and the massive injection of self belief instilled into kids at elite private schools, coupled with the fact that they’re mixing with future CEOs, Politicians, and Religious Leaders doesn’t hurt. Historically the attitude at places like Eton and Harrow was “I was captain of the first eleven, of course I can be governor of India”.
What you have to think about is private schools are a business, the schools cherry pick the best students and go to great lengths to teach and coach students to keep up the their intake into university. The public schools get what is left with many from underprivileged back grounds yet according to the NAPLAN tests shows there is very little difference between a public and private school.
The best thing about private schooling is the 'old school tie' my eldest attended Haileybury College, still as thick as two short planks but landed a plum job because of his school.

What happens when they get to university?
State school kids do better at uni

As for leadership can it be taught, only to a certain level, a lot of the traits of a good leader one has to be born with. We often see people in politics who can talk the talk but fail to walk the walk. It takes that bit extra to be thick skinned and tough, while it can be taught many just can't carry it out.
 
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Kerby

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What you have to think about is private schools are a business, the schools cherry pick the best students and go to great lengths to teach and coach students to keep up the their intake into university. The public schools get what is left with many from underprivileged back grounds yet according to the NAPLAN tests shows there is very little difference between a public and private school.
The best thing about private schooling is the 'old school tie' my eldest attended Haileybury College, still as thick as two short planks but landed a plum job because of his school.

What happens when they get to university?
State school kids do better at uni

As for leadership can it be taught, only to a certain level, a lot of the traits of a good leader one has to be born with. We often see people in politics who can talk the talk but fail to walk the walk. It takes that bit extra to be thick skinned and tough, while it can be taught many just can't carry it out.

Ridiculously, in the UK private schools are registered as having charitable status, so technically not businesses, but I take your point. The reality is that the very useful “old school tie” is, to an extent available to anyone with deep enough pockets. I know it’s not quite the same thing but as a very senior member of staff at St. Andrews University said “ thank god we didn’t have to find a degree for Harry”.

State school pupils may do as well at Uni (I don’t know so I’ll take your word for it), but I suspect what you’re really talking about is “Value added, or distance travelled” ie who has developed most on their educational journey from the point of entry. If the same results are achieved by both state and private pupils then on the whole state pupils will have greater “value added learning” due to their typically lower starting point. The problem with this is that state school kids don’t get a chance in the first place, with the overwhelming majority of places at top universities being taken up by those from private schools.

There is no such thing as a born leader, in the same way that Deus et mon droit (God and my right), can go and do one. The reason why people like BJ et al are such poor examples is an overinflated sense of self belief and the fact that no one has ever really said to no the privileged little turd.
 

Kerby

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Ridiculously, in the UK private schools are registered as having charitable status, so technically not businesses, but I take your point. The reality is that the very useful “old school tie” is, to an extent available to anyone with deep enough pockets. I know it’s not quite the same thing but as a very senior member of staff at St. Andrews University said “ thank god we didn’t have to find a degree for Harry”.

State school pupils may do as well at Uni (I don’t know so I’ll take your word for it), but I suspect what you’re really talking about is “Value add, or distance travelled” ie who has developed most on their educational journey from the point of entry. If the same results are achieved by both state and private pupils then on the whole state pupils will have greater “value added learning” due to their typically lower starting point. The problem with this is that state school kids don’t get a chance in the first place, with the overwhelming majority of places at top universities being taken up by those from private schools.

There is no such thing as a born leader, in the same way that Deus et mon droit (God and my right), can go and do one. The reason why people like BJ et al are such poor examples is an overinflated sense of self belief and the fact that no one has ever really said to no the privileged little turd.
I think we may, just a teeny, tiny bit, be wandering off topic 🤣
 

Clint

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"Leadership"....over the years I've found basically two types...text book and proper.
The text book don't know what to do and are incapable when their reference book runs out. Proper don't need a text book..they are usually realists,have common sense,can spot a bul1sh1tter a mile off and are far and few. I can honestly say I've only ever had one real manager in my working life..a chap now gone called Terry who once was a boss at steel works in South Wales...been there,seen it all got the tshirt. A proper man's man,knew how to speak to people,deal with idiots and reward his workers...he was a gentleman. One of his quirks was a piece of yellow and red card in his top pocket...if he saw you ar5ing about all he did was hold up the card..very effective at distance in a noisy environment...only fools got the red card.
 
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"Leadership"....over the years I've found basically two types...text book and proper.
The text book don't know what to do and are incapable when their reference book runs out. Proper don't need a text book..they are usually realists,have common sense,can spot a bul1sh1tter a mile off and are far and few. I can honestly say I've only ever had one real manager in my working life..a chap now gone called Terry who once was a boss at steel works in South Wales...been there,seen it all got the tshirt. A proper man's man,knew how to speak to people,deal with idiots and reward his workers...he was a gentleman. One of his quirks was a piece of yellow and red card in his top pocket...if he saw you ar5ing about all he did was hold up the card..very effective at distance in a noisy environment...only fools got the red card.
I would imagine he would have got the respect he deserved. I had one early on in my career knew exactly when to use the big stick or the carrot. Would have followed him anywhere. Something that doesn't come out of a text book.
 
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"Leadership"....over the years I've found basically two types...text book and proper.
The text book don't know what to do and are incapable when their reference book runs out. Proper don't need a text book..they are usually realists,have common sense,can spot a bul1sh1tter a mile off and are far and few. ……
I worked for all kinds of “Manager” and it makes it a lot easier if the person knows what he’s doing!

My favourite (luckily I didn’t work for him) was the prat who was put in charge of a Scottish Estate where I lived.

The man called together his workforce and told them “In the Army I was known as firm but fair!” and explained how he was going to build a factory that made wood “briquettes”.

His Gamekeeper, a man well into his 60’s, said “So, you’re suggesting that we take something like this,” he brandished a lump of wood, “chop it into bits then glue them back together and sell them?” “Firm but Fair” nodded.

“Why will people buy these ‘briquettes’ and burn them when they can buy lumps of wood instead?” asked the Gamekeeper. “You know nothing about business!” replied “Firm but Fair”.

“Firm but Fair” went ahead with his plan, lost the Estate £500,000, the factory was shutdown by the HSE Inspector after one day of operation and the Estate hired a Factor to manage the Estate …

… and the mother of “Firm but Fair” (who owned the Estate and had given him the job) often wished he’d never left the Army!
:hat:
 

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