Pint365 beer engine

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Dads_Ale

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At one point I’d tried all of the Maiden beers, but they’ve released another 3 over the last 18 months that I haven’t had a chance to try yet.
You might have to move now as the latest Iron Maiden beer is a collaboration with BrewDog. 6% Hellcat (carbon negative) :laugh8:
 

MickDundee

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You might have to move now as the latest Iron Maiden beer is a collaboration with BrewDog. 6% Hellcat (carbon negative) :laugh8:
The Brewdog Lost Lager is supposed to be carbon negative too, but the free 4 pack I got a couple of months back was delivered inside 2 cardboard boxes.
 

Dilettante Brewing

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This thread is making me want a Pint365. It is my birthday next month wink....

I see that you can connect them directly to a pressure barrel. Am I right in thinking that you can do this without having a constant gas supply to the S30 cap to maintain pressure. How quickly does the natural pressure in the barrel dissipate when you pull the pints? What happens when the pressure reduces? Presumably the barrel doesn't implode!! :?: Appreciate you can use bag-in-box / polypins / corny but pressure barrels just seem easier for secondary fermenting ales and keeping them in good nick.

Is the general consensus that with the Pint365 it's designed such that you can get away without a cask breather (i.e. it will take a couple of psi of gas pressure) and a separate demand valve (because it has something built in)?
 

RoomWithABrew

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A few psi, separate demand valve and the odd squirt of CO2 from the S30 will see you right. When you are near to finishing the barrel then just open it up.
Another option is small bag in box such as for wine refilled and then used in a day or so, similar with small kegs. Logistically at the moment I find the small keg transfer and just leave it open when pulling the pint and close it to the air when not pulling the pint. Working on an idea for a cheap 8 litre " cask " that can be used for real ale and just drunk over a weekend.
 

peebee

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This thread is making me want a Pint365. It is my birthday next month wink....

I see that you can connect them directly to a pressure barrel. Am I right in thinking that you can do this without having a constant gas supply to the S30 cap to maintain pressure. How quickly does the natural pressure in the barrel dissipate when you pull the pints? What happens when the pressure reduces? Presumably the barrel doesn't implode!! :?: Appreciate you can use bag-in-box / polypins / corny but pressure barrels just seem easier for secondary fermenting ales and keeping them in good nick.

Is the general consensus that with the Pint365 it's designed such that you can get away without a cask breather (i.e. it will take a couple of psi of gas pressure) and a separate demand valve (because it has something built in)?
You can checkout my "treatise" (linked below) concerning precautions to take with CO2. Corny kegs have the issue that a hand-pump will suck air into the keg via the seals (which cannot handle "negative" pressures) but if using a pressure barrel then as you suspect, a hand-pump will collapse them.

"How quickly does the natural pressure in the barrel dissipate when you pull the pints?". How long is a piece of string! But very quickly if the barrel is full.

"(i.e. it will take a couple of psi of gas pressure)"? All hand-pumps will take 2 PSI (150mbar, the pressure I use for "bitter" types). Some will start creaking and groaning at 5PSI. Some will handle outrageous pressures! I think it's the pump's flapper valves that vibrate if subject to excess pressure? I understand they have a "check-valve"??? Check-valves prevent beer returning to the barrel. Demand valves (which also do the job of a check-valve) prevents beer coming out when you didn't ask for it.
 
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