Pizza: Low moisture mozzarella UK?

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lupinehorror

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Plus one for your AYB reference. Sorry to hear about your hands, I've had a lot of success with no-knead recipes if that's any help? I pretty much roughly mix my dough so that it's 90% combined then leave it overnight, give it another stir the next day to incorporate any left over dry bits then let it mature in the fridge for a one or two more days (or until I have to knock it back to stop it escaping the tupperware!). It's pretty forgiving and I've left it for up to a week and it's still been usable, but after that the gluten tends to weaken and the dough falls apart if you stretch it too thin.
that is indeed helpful. i'm getting rather frustrated because of the 'simple' things i can no longer do (until they actually diagnose whatever it is. i hope they get to the bottom of it certainly).
i will be giving that a go hopefully this week as i'm at least still able to stir and dollop.
thank you 🍕
 

Bjorn Toulouse

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I use lidl buffalo mozzarella. cut it up into slices, lightly fry to get rid of the water. the "milk" that is left in the pan I use with mushrooms for an ace mushroom sauce. Like wise I use the Jaimie method of frying pan and grill to cook the pizza. Yum
 

lupinehorror

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I use lidl buffalo mozzarella. cut it up into slices, lightly fry to get rid of the water. the "milk" that is left in the pan I use with mushrooms for an ace mushroom sauce. Like wise I use the Jaimie method of frying pan and grill to cook the pizza. Yum
frying pan method? interesting. like a frittata? so fry it in the pan (dry?) then stick the pan under the grill to finish?
 

umfana

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I tend to slice or tear wet moz balls in the morning before an evening pizza session and put them uncovered in the fridge on a plate. They are perfect dryness in the early evening.

Also on oven temp - ever since getting my ooni pro I have only used the oven once and it was 🤮 in comparison. Despite the faff involved the shear heat and smokiness of the wood fired oven are worth it every time.
 

peebee

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that is indeed helpful. i'm getting rather frustrated because of the 'simple' things i can no longer do (until they actually diagnose whatever it is. i hope they get to the bottom of it certainly).
i will be giving that a go hopefully this week as i'm at least still able to stir and dollop.
thank you 🍕
A bread-maker? Most (all?) can do dough only programs; mine even has a pizza dough setting! I found it easy to justify the expense because decent bread is impossible to buy round here too. How would I know about hand issues and bread-making? Let's just say if pushed I'll write left-handed now (I was right-handed ... I've still got a, unpredictable, right hand BTW).


This has been an inspiring thread! I have never really questioned why supermarket cheese is so "wet" and so followed up what the supermarkets get up to. Mass produced mozzarella isn't made quite like I thought, it's processed so that it can be dropped into moulds to form a "skin". Makes sense really, there isn't some robot stretching and forming the balls like is done by hand. The stretching and forming squeezes the whey out - get it wrong (or use too much rennet, or the wrong rennet to what you think) and you end up with non-melting, tough, squeaky cheese (that you can grate).

The thread has dropped me into a whole new world of rennet choices, milk choices, process choices, etc. And I thought I was doing quite well with my home-made mozzarella, forced on me because the pandemic dried up my supply of supermarket cheese. But I was only doing "okay" and this thread opens up a whole new approach. Which can only mean "more pizza"! And that can only mean "more beer-brewing"! :beer1:

The mythical "low-moisture" stuff is an Americanism - we get it in dry rubbery blocks but not described as "low-moisture". It's the naff stuff you can grate (even buy ready grated!). Apparently people do make "pizza" out of this. sick...
 

umfana

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A bread-maker? Most (all?) can do dough only programs; mine even has a pizza dough setting! I found it easy to justify the expense because decent bread is impossible to buy round here too. How would I know about hand issues and bread-making? Let's just say if pushed I'll write left-handed now (I was right-handed ... I've still got a, unpredictable, right hand BTW).

...
I second a bread machine.
But I don't follow the dough instructions with my machine (now over 20 years old).

my process -
1. Throw in 00 flour and water (to 65% hydration)
2. Start dough setting and let it mix until all the flour is incorporated. - about 5 min.
3. Stop the machine and reset it.
4. Leave it to hydrate (autolyse) for about 2 hours. Anything over 30 mins works. This is the key bit as it really makes the dough super workable.
5. Add olive oil, salt, slightly hydrated yeast (not next to the salt), and tiny bit of sugar (like 1/3 tsp)
6. Restart bread machine on dough setting from the start.
7. When completed form into dough balls and put in the fridge until needed best between 24 hours and 72 hours.

Almost zero effort compared with manually making pizza dough.

Even without a bread machine the autolyse step would help reduce the work required.
 

F00b4r

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I second a bread machine.
But I don't follow the dough instructions with my machine (now over 20 years old).

my process -
1. Throw in 00 flour and water (to 65% hydration)
2. Start dough setting and let it mix until all the flour is incorporated. - about 5 min.
3. Stop the machine and reset it.
4. Leave it to hydrate (autolyse) for about 2 hours. Anything over 30 mins works. This is the key bit as it really makes the dough super workable.
5. Add olive oil, salt, slightly hydrated yeast (not next to the salt), and tiny bit of sugar (like 1/3 tsp)
6. Restart bread machine on dough setting from the start.
7. When completed form into dough balls and put in the fridge until needed best between 24 hours and 72 hours.

Almost zero effort compared with manually making pizza dough.

Even without a bread machine the autolyse step would help reduce the work required.
I might have to try this to see how it compares. How much flour can this method cope with?
 

lupinehorror

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i gave away my bread maker a couple of years ago as i was...eating too much bread.
may have a look around for a bargain next month. does anyone have any ideas as to what offers really good value? (not swimming in monies at the moment).
my hand issues are worsening rather than improving so mechanical assistance seems like a good plan right now.
don't fancy a 'help me choose a bread maker' thread but thought i'd ask in here despite it being off topic as others seem to use them.
apologies @roboto if that's out of order.
 

umfana

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I might have to try this to see how it compares. How much flour can this method cope with?
How big is your bread machine?

Follow the instructions it has to find the max.

I normally make 3x 200g dough balls at 65 to 70% hydration.

But my bread machine is over 20 years old I think.

But in general the autolyse method works with manual mixing too. Reduces the amount of work needed considerably.
 

F00b4r

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How big is your bread machine?

Follow the instructions it has to find the max.

I normally make 3x 200g dough balls at 65 to 70% hydration.

But my bread machine is over 20 years old I think.

But in general the autolyse method works with manual mixing too. Reduces the amount of work needed considerably.
It’s one of the bigger Panasonic ones but it’s quite a while ago I bought it. I’m guessing that I can probably do a 1kg bag but will check out the manual. Cheers.
 
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