Priming after cold crashing

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Tonight I kegged an APA, using a 10L minikeg. The rest of the batch (another 10L ) will be bottled.
Although all my batches so far have been carbed as I'd like, my last brew ( First Gold IPA ) is my first failure - totally over carbed.
I think I've been guilty of becoming a bit slap dash with bottling since I started kegging, like it's a bit of an after thought.
After looking at priming calculators I realise I've not considered the affect of bottling directly after cold crashing,
using their figures I should be using roughly half what I'd use at fermentation temperature ( 3.5c vs 19c ) due to CO2 suspended in solution.
This makes sense since when I've sugar primed corny kegs, after reading around I used approximately half amount I'd use for a barrel.
It explains the problem with my last bottles which is a shame as the keg is lovely.
I racked from primary to a bottling bucket before kegging so now I'm thinking it might be easier to put it back in the fridge,
bring it back up to 19c and bottle tomorrow using my normal rate.
Interested to hear how everyone else does it ?
 

Dutto

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It seems pointless to Cold Crash before carbonating as adding sugar will restart fermentation, thereby restart suspended yeast - and bang goes the main reason for Cold Crashing!

Personally, I would start the carbonation process by adding the sugar in bulk to the bottling-bucket and then rely on “Gravity+ Time” to clear and condition the brew rather than bother with a Cold Crash.
:hat:
 

sifty

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I've had similar questions, especially with lagers, that you ferment at say 9-12 degs, then ramp to 19/20 degs for a diacetyl rest, then cold crash. Which temp do you use for calculating residual CO2...?

Consensus I saw (amongst the arguments) was to use the highest temp reached. But there were many conflicting views.

I prefer a good head so err on the high side, using highest temp. Never had any issues with over carbonation...
 

Alastair70

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The calc temps reflect what the beer will be sitting at for the next two weeks during carbonation, that’s when the residual yeast in solution is working.
The purpose of the cold crash is to get clear beer into your bottles, it takes care of any kettle trub or hop matter that may be floating around in the FV prior to packaging. Anything thrown up during carbonation will settle out during cold conditioning afterwards and you go back to clear beer. That being said, not everyone cold crashes, it’s an optional step.
 

foxy

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Tonight I kegged an APA, using a 10L minikeg. The rest of the batch (another 10L ) will be bottled.
Although all my batches so far have been carbed as I'd like, my last brew ( First Gold IPA ) is my first failure - totally over carbed.
I think I've been guilty of becoming a bit slap dash with bottling since I started kegging, like it's a bit of an after thought.
After looking at priming calculators I realise I've not considered the affect of bottling directly after cold crashing,
using their figures I should be using roughly half what I'd use at fermentation temperature ( 3.5c vs 19c ) due to CO2 suspended in solution.
This makes sense since when I've sugar primed corny kegs, after reading around I used approximately half amount I'd use for a barrel.
It explains the problem with my last bottles which is a shame as the keg is lovely.
I racked from primary to a bottling bucket before kegging so now I'm thinking it might be easier to put it back in the fridge,
bring it back up to 19c and bottle tomorrow using my normal rate.
Interested to hear how everyone else does it ?
I follow the guide, if my beer coming out of cold crash is 1C, I will prime in accordance with that temperature. The CO2 in the solution is equal to the CO2 above it, so it will vary with the temperature. As it warms up the CO2 will leave the solution, meaning you will need more sugar to get to the carbonation level you require.
 
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Thanks for all replies, in the end I put the bucket back in the fridge after filling the minikeg and have set it back to 19c then I'll do the bottling this evening.
I prefer cold crashing for kegging, it means co2 is absorbed easier and I can see the level as it fills by condensation.
Also more efficient in syphoning into secondary bucket as trub and hop debris is compacted like a pancake.
Each to their own though !
 

Dutto

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……
Also more efficient in syphoning into secondary bucket as trub and hop debris is compacted like a pancake.
…….

I get almost no trub or hop debris in my kegs as I use one of these at the end of a copper siphon tube. (I usually start half-way down the FV to ensure that there is zero trub or debris available for what will be the first keg I drink! athumb..)

“PULABO 5pcs Stainless Steel Mesh Homebrew Inching Siphon Filter For Beer Brewing Wine Making”

From Amazon - £3.64 for 5 of them. (I have 5 on order after giving away four of the previous five and thinking “What if …?”:confused.:)

Enjoy.
:hat:
 

Alastair70

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I follow the guide, if my beer coming out of cold crash is 1C, I will prime in accordance with that temperature. The CO2 in the solution is equal to the CO2 above it, so it will vary with the temperature. As it warms up the CO2 will leave the solution, meaning you will need more sugar to get to the carbonation level you require.
I do it differently. I‘ll warm condition for 2 weeks at room temp, usually 18C, so 18C is the temp that goes into the calculator. During that time viable yeast cells in suspension in the beer catabolise the priming sugar and generate CO2 which will be in equilibrium in the liquid and gas in the bottle. I then cold condition for 2 weeks. As CO2 is more soluble in liquid at lower temps, more CO2 ends up in the beer and less in the gaseous phase above the liquid after cold conditioning.
If you warm condition at a warmer temp you need to add a bit more sugar as the yeast cells are more active biologically. Cold crashing clears big floaty crud out of the beer improving clarity but leaves the viable yeast cells behind. It shouldn't interfere with the bottle conditioning part of the process.
Heres a Saison I’ve just poured that was cold crashed for 7 days at 1.5C before the 2+2 weeks bottle condition.
B4E75AD4-1CE9-4BF8-A2F4-9D5ABE0E3925.jpeg
 
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