Priming and Carbonation

Discussion in 'Beer Brewing "How-To" Guides' started by Pugh, Jan 31, 2020.

Help Support The Homebrew Forum UK by donating:

  1. Jan 31, 2020 #1

    Pugh

    Pugh

    Pugh

    New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 31, 2020
    Messages:
    9
    Likes Received:
    0
    Hi Everyone,

    I'm new to homebrewing and even newer to the forum!

    I've bottled a couple of brews and made sure ~3g of priming sugar was in each bottle and I've been a bit underwhelmed by the carbonation. I've been opening a bottle every 3 days since bottling to see how it's going on and I'm a bit underwhelmed. (I know that it develops over a couple of weeks, but, still...). I know that when you keg you generally use less sugar.

    I recently got a corney keg and all the associated bits in part to be able to control the carbonation of my brews. My question is: do I need to prime the brew for kegging into a corney, or just keg the beer and set the CO2 pressure?

    Thanks in advance!
     
  2. Feb 1, 2020 #2

    Horners

    Horners

    Horners

    Landlord. Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2018
    Messages:
    571
    Likes Received:
    225
    Location:
    NULL
    With the corney, no need to prime. You simply decide what temperature the beer is going to be stored at and then using a carbonation chart determine what pressure to set regulator to to achieve desired level of carbonation. Then just'set and forget' for a week or so. There are methods to achieve desired carbonation levels more quickly but as the beer needs a couple of weeks in keg anyway I don't bother.

    One of advantages of not priming is you don't get left with the additional yeast sediment from the secondary fermentation.
     
    Last edited: Feb 1, 2020
    Drunkula likes this.
  3. Feb 1, 2020 #3

    Ben034

    Ben034

    Ben034

    Regular.

    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2013
    Messages:
    236
    Likes Received:
    60
    Location:
    London
    What temperature are the primed bottles being stored at? If the bottles are 500ml and you have used 3g sugar per bottle they should end up a fizzy 2.5 vols (assuming your measurements are correct with the sugar). After this keeping them somewhere warm and patience are key.
     
  4. Feb 1, 2020 #4

    terrym

    terrym

    terrym

    Member

    Joined:
    Apr 12, 2015
    Messages:
    5,359
    Likes Received:
    2,810
    Location:
    North Sussex
    +1 on temperature. Even with only a smidgin of yeast in the bottle it should fully carb up in 7-10 days if held at 19/20*C
     
  5. Feb 1, 2020 #5

    Pugh

    Pugh

    Pugh

    New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 31, 2020
    Messages:
    9
    Likes Received:
    0
    Thank you all for your input!

    The bottles are stored at 20C-22C, I'm now thinking that too much of the yeast dropped out of the beer before bottling meaning there's not much to work with the priming sugar... Does that sound like it might have been the issue?

    Thanks for the feedback on the corney, too. Much appreciated.
     
  6. Feb 1, 2020 #6

    xozzx

    xozzx

    xozzx

    Member

    Joined:
    Oct 7, 2016
    Messages:
    345
    Likes Received:
    112
    Location:
    Aberdeenshire
    Very unlikely. Unless you left the beer for a few months in the fermenter you will have enough yeast in the bottles to carbonate, tho it might take a couple of weeks. If you just added the sugar directly to the bottles you might need to swirl them a bit to get it to dissolve into the beer. When I bottled I would batch prime by dissolving 100g sugar into the bottling bucket and gently swirling to mix it in.
     
  7. Feb 2, 2020 #7

    the baron

    the baron

    the baron

    Landlord.

    Joined:
    Oct 13, 2013
    Messages:
    1,605
    Likes Received:
    580
    Location:
    castleford
    Agree the yeast will not have dropped enough to stop it fermenting as long as you are not leaving it in the FV for a lengthy time. Regards teaspoon I use a plastic one from the baking sets and put a knife over it to make it level and by the way I use 1/2 of a teaspoon and never had a problem which is about 2.5g I believe. I never batch prime as I think it is just another chance of oxidising the beer by transferring it into another bucket and then having to transfer it to the bottles from their( I generally corny my beers and have to bottle 4 or 5 from a batch) also the sugar will dissolve on its own and shaking or swirling further risks oxidising the beer
    Ps do you know your capper/caps are sealing properly?
     
  8. Feb 2, 2020 #8

    Pugh

    Pugh

    Pugh

    New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 31, 2020
    Messages:
    9
    Likes Received:
    0
    Thanks again all.

    I'll keep fingers crossed for the next couple of weeks!
     
  9. Feb 4, 2020 #9

    PerthRod

    PerthRod

    PerthRod

    Active Member

    Joined:
    Dec 16, 2016
    Messages:
    35
    Likes Received:
    13
    Location:
    Perth
    Top tip....................when bottling, use some plastic bottles as well as the usual glass ones(I use the 500ml ones that sparkling water comes in).
    This enables you to check how carbonation is progressing by feeling how hard the bottles are getting - saves opening bottles and wasting beer !
     
    Pugh likes this.

Draft saved Draft deleted

Share This Page

Group Builder