Question about using a co2 supply

Discussion in 'General Home Brew Equipment Discussion' started by Dave 666, Jan 18, 2020.

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  1. Jan 18, 2020 #1

    Dave 666

    Dave 666

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    So I got my co2 supply this week and started trying to use it yesterday afternoon. Connected it up as per you would and hearing slight leaks tightened things up. Used soapy water to confirm no leaks I could see. So I initially set the pressure at 35PSI (ok it's slightly higher than required) to force carbonate what was already a lightly carbonated lager in the keg.

    I give the keg a few shakes last night to help get the co2 in the lager and as expected the pressure drops slightly. Before bed I set the pressure to 30PSI and switch the supply off. Only this morning the pressure reads about 4PSI. Now does this indicate a leak, despite no obvious signs, or is it more likely the lager taking on the co2?.
     
  2. Jan 18, 2020 #2

    pms67

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    It’s the beer absorbing the Co2
    I don’t turn the gas off, ever, if there is no leaks there there is no need to turn it off imo.
     
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  3. Jan 18, 2020 #3

    Hopsteep

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    A good test is to turn off the CO2 from the bottle but leave the gas line pressurised with the regulator set at whatever pressure you are using. If there is a leak then the regulator pressure will drop over night. This only works though if you can isolate the keg (Sankey kegs just lift up the handle of the coupler) or if the beer is fully carbonated. As pms67 says, when carbing your beer you it will absorb all of the CO2 that you force in :beer1:
     
  4. Jan 18, 2020 #4

    Dave 666

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    Thanks guys, nice to know it's likely just the beer taking on the co2. Clearly I can never see the gauge drop as I watch it, but it does slowly drop over a number of hours which surprised me as it was lightly carbonated and stored at a not ideal for lager 12° (hopefully converting the old fridge soon) But as outside is much lower temps, well the back yard it is. I'm going to let it absorb some more over the next hour or so as it chills and then give it a go this afternoon.

    As for leaving the co2 on all the time, well I'm still getting used to using the co2 supply and whilst it's cheap enough (£10 per 10 litre fill) that cost isn't a major issue, I still want to be 100% sure on usage before I'm happy doing so.
     
  5. Jan 18, 2020 #5

    foxbat

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    By the way 30psi is really high if you're intending to leave it on. You'd most likely be pouring foam at that pressure.
     
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  6. Jan 18, 2020 #6

    Dave 666

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    Well it's slowly going down as it's absorbed into the beer. Though for serving I'd reduce the pressure down to about 10-12 psi . That's the good thing about the plastic pressure barrel, it's shown that you don't really need above 10-12 psi for serving.
     
  7. Jan 18, 2020 #7

    Dave 666

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    So, trying the beer after carbonation etc. Clearly more carbonated but not as much as I'd have expected. But maybe that's down to a little less than 24 hours period and an on off process on the co2?. But what gets me is more foam despite checking the pressure before hand. Maybe that's more down to direct tap to keg that running from a line I'm thinking. Still awaiting the bits to run a line so cant test until in the next week.
     
  8. Jan 18, 2020 #8

    Hopsteep

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    It will foam unless you gradually reduce the pressure with some 3/16 beer line (or loads of 3/8 beer line) asad. there are loads of calculators online that will tell you home much line to use based on the pressure of the beer, elevation of the tap and temperature
     
  9. Jan 19, 2020 #9

    Dave 666

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    I'm just awaiting 2m of each length 3/16 & 3/8 and the reducer\connectors etc. Not looking at using 4m of beer line but rather the minimal length I need to reduce the foam but covering my options all the same. In the end I only got rid of the foaming by pretty much reducing the pressure down to zero. So yeah, kind of annoyed that I bought a setup to connect straight to the keg when it just won't work with carbonated ales without causing to much foam!.
     
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  10. Jan 19, 2020 #10

    pms67

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    Told you it was a bit of a con!
    I done it too, forget about it and realise you are well on the road to beer on tap , don’t get too hung up on what lengths of line you use, 3/16 is your friend if you want a decent (but slower) pour
     
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  11. Jan 20, 2020 #11

    Dave 666

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    Yeah, it may just be suitable on low carbonated or pressured ales, but any real level of carbonation or pressure is clearly going to cause more foam than anyone can for with. And the lack of clarification staying many will need a line was a frustrating thing to find out. But thankfully I hope it's all done with and I'm sorted.

    Though I was going to ask about the line lengths for each of 3/16 and 3/8 etc as it's turned up whilst in work. I don't seem able to go with just the 3/16 line (which is thinner than I expected). As the parts were based on going from 3/8 to 3/16 & then back to 3/8 again as it looked available parts wise that I needed to be 3/8 connecting to the forcet. Might look if I can find a combination of parts that might allow otherwise. But other that that, 2 very short 3/8 either end with a longer 3/16 in the middle I'm thinking.
     
  12. Jan 20, 2020 #12

    Dave 666

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    In looking, seems about 3 1/2 foot of 3/16 and several inch of 3/8 either end for connector\reducer purposes should be ok based on about 12PSI serving pressure?.
     
  13. Jan 20, 2020 #13

    pms67

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    That’s it 2D6C49DC-AF11-4C6F-B45A-35DDB917C736.jpeg
     

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  14. Jan 20, 2020 #14

    Dave 666

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    So as said just tried it, about 3ft 3 1/2 inch (1 mitre) of 3/16 then about 5 inch of 3/8 each end. Certainly works a hell of a lot better. Just need to fine tune the pressure tomorrow, but I'm thinking no more than 12, maybe even 10 would work better.
     

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