Question on fermentation times and temps

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Hi, I’ve read Palmer’s How to Brew and watched David Heath’s fermentation guide and read the posts in this forum but still have questions on fermentation with English Ale yeast, if anyone can help I’d appreciate it.

So far I’m starting off the yeast at the lower end of its range, say 18’ and leaving until my tilt shows that I’m only a few points away from the OG, maybe 3-4 days, then the temp. Is increased by 1’ a day until I reach the upper end of the range say 23’, so five days for this and just over a week in total. Can I raise the temp. Faster without an issue?

I’m not sure how long I should leave it at 23’, twice the initial stage of 3-4 days? This would give a total time of three weeks

Then from 23’ I cool it down by a degree a day to about 10’, should I go lower? Cooling to 10’ takes about 2 weeks

I then and then keg it.

Any advice on the timings and temperature or whether I’m going over-Board would be great
 
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Yes, I think that you are going over board

Extremes of temperature will affect the fermentation, too cold it won't ferment properly, too hot 26C + you may produce acetone type flavours

I don't understand the up a degree each day and the down again - really not sure what purpose that serves

Remember the human race has been brewing beer for over 12,000 years - without exact temperature control

I used to work as a tour guide at Robinsons Brewery in Stockport - all their fermentation takes place in open fermenting vats with no temperature control at all

Beware what you read in books (but not on this forum) - there is a whole industry trying to get you to spend more money on their (essential) products
 
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I think you may be overthinking this. What you want is a stable temperature with minimal fluctuations. 18-20C will be just fine for English ale yeast. Its all about letting the yeast munch the sugar without getting stressed.

Cold crashing will help clear the beer but is not necessary. Time will do just as good a job.

Folk in this parish often recommend 2 weeks in the fermentation vessel, 2 to Carb in bottle and 2 to rest and improve. Its a good rule of thumb.

I generally ferment at 18-20 for 2 weeks then bottle and Carb at room temperature for another 2. Then I lack any patience and crack one open after a bad day at work.

You'll find your own rhythms but don't fool yourself there is a perfect, super complicated way of brewing. Keep it simple and make sure it works for you. Then refine and improve as you go.
 
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Yes, I think that you are going over board

Extremes of temperature will affect the fermentation, too cold it won't ferment properly, too hot 26C + you may produce acetone type flavours

I don't understand the up a degree each day and the down again - really not sure what purpose that serves

Remember the human race has been brewing beer for over 12,000 years - without exact temperature control

I used to work as a tour guide at Robinsons Brewery in Stockport - all their fermentation takes place in open fermenting vats with no temperature control at all

Beware what you read in books (but not on this forum) - there is a whole industry trying to get you to spend more money on their (essential) products
Thanks, the one degree was supposed to avoid stressing the yeast! I’m way past stressed trying to maintain the temps! Thanks for the advice
 
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I think you may be overthinking this. What you want is a stable temperature with minimal fluctuations. 18-20C will be just fine for English ale yeast. Its all about letting the yeast munch the sugar without getting stressed.

Cold crashing will help clear the beer but is not necessary. Time will do just as good a job.

Folk in this parish often recommend 2 weeks in the fermentation vessel, 2 to Carb in bottle and 2 to rest and improve. Its a good rule of thumb.

I generally ferment at 18-20 for 2 weeks then bottle and Carb at room temperature for another 2. Then I lack any patience and crack one open after a bad day at work.

You'll find your own rhythms but don't fool yourself there is a perfect, super complicated way of brewing. Keep it simple and make sure it works for you. Then refine and improve as you go.
Thanks I’ll keep it simple
 
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I found that consistency was the key. Once I gained a brew fridge wired to and SC1000 the quality of my (kit) beer improved markedly. I tend to go for two weeks but the last couch of kits were down to target after 7 days so I gave them three more on secondary before bottling.
 
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