Recommend books for all grain brewing.

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Bearded_jimmy

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Afternoon all,
Just did a google search on it and there a mass books out there. So I thought I’ll ask about and see if any one has any recommendations and any must have on your book shelf.

cheers
(writen with a brewdog parama violet in hand :beer1:)
 

Sadfield

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There's so many, so it largely depends on where you are with AG brewing, what you want to know. Basic process? Recipes to brew? How to formulate recipes? Something deeper, more technical?
What do you own already?

 

Bearded_jimmy

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my knowledge is pretty limited, but building on it with YouTube videos, no looking to start it soon, maybe next March
 

Galena

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I would recommend reading (several times) 'How to Brew' by John Palmer, it goes from the basics right up to complicated but if you really want to understand the process fully then I think this is the only book that gives that level. It's not for everyone and is a little 'Americanised' in places but will give you a good level of knowledge.
Some chapters get a bit too involved in the maths for most people but you can skim over the maths as modern day software does all of that for you anyway.
 

MmmBeer

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Start with the bible, you'll never regret buying that, after that it depends what else you are trying to get out of it. CAMRA's Brew your own British Real Ale by Graham Wheeler is good if that's what you like to brew, there are other clone recipe books for other beer styles. Randy Mosher's Radical Brewing and James Morton's Brew both give a little more detail and are both fun.
 

Sadfield

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CAMRA's Brew your own British Real Ale by Graham Wheeler
Or CAMRAs Essential Homebrewing coauthored by Wheeler and Andy Parker, and is an updated version of the text, with more modern recipes, supplied by many breweries. Buy this one if you like modern craft styles and the above one if you like traditional cask ale.

Randy Mosher, Mastering Homebrew is my pick.
 

Hop_it

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I doubt very much if there is a "one size fits all" homebrewing book available. During my many years of brewing I've collected quite a lot of brewing books, and I've learnt something from all of them. In recent years I've bought several of the American books, e.g. How to Brew (John Palmer), Brewing Classic Styles (Zainasheff & Palmer) and Mastering Homebrew (Randy Mosher). They are all very good, and up to date with modern beer styles/trends.
Of these three I would say that "How to Brew" is the most detailed and thorough. I would suggest this one for somebody with a technical mind who is just starting out, although there is plenty there for the more experienced homebrewer as well.
"Brewing Classic Styles" is mainly recipes, but with enough supporting information to steer the homebrewer in the right direction. This book is ideal for the more experienced homebrewer, but probably not for a beginner.
"Mastering Homebrew" has a refreshing "lower tech" approach (compared to "How to Brew") with lots of diagrams and graphics which makes it easy to read and easy to follow. It's not full of "clone" recipes, but offers plenty of guidance on how to achieve the characteristic flavour profiles of most popular beer styles. I really like this book.

Good luck athumb..
 

Disildor

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Should I choose only one book, I would go for the How to Brew wrote by John Palmer. It contains more than everything needed to know how to Brew, despite being quite a heavy reading, closer to a textbook than a book to enjoy.

The Home Brew Beer from Greg Hughes is easier and probably more enjoyable to read. It is a great first reading and contains plenty of good recipes. However, it might be insufficient to start home brewing. I personally found that I needed to complete most parts with other sources.
 

HSD

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I’m not at the stage with knowledge or kit (or funds!) to go all grain for anything over 2 gallons or so, mostly BIAB with my large 20 litre stockpot. Apart from the great Palmer and Hughes books and this forum, these two have proved invaluable to get going and give it a go:

Brooklyn Brew Shop's 52 Seasonal Recipes for Small batches

and there second book:


Make some beer

simple recipes and process, helped me get over the mental block I seemed to have of next step up from kits
 

Galena

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Should I choose only one book, I would go for the How to Brew wrote by John Palmer. It contains more than everything needed to know how to Brew, despite being quite a heavy reading, closer to a textbook than a book to enjoy.

The Home Brew Beer from Greg Hughes is easier and probably more enjoyable to read. It is a great first reading and contains plenty of good recipes. However, it might be insufficient to start home brewing. I personally found that I needed to complete most parts with other sources.
I totally agree with your summary, Greg Hughes book is an easy read and a good way to start brewing and more importantly some great recipes all-grain but you won't really learn how brewing works from it.
 

An Ankoù

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Afternoon all,
Just did a google search on it and there a mass books out there. So I thought I’ll ask about and see if any one has any recommendations and any must have on your book shelf.

cheers
(writen with a brewdog parama violet in hand :beer1:)
Ye gods! That sounds and looks horrendous!
1637415595835.png

If that's the way things are going, I'd better get to work on my crème de menthe and tequila imperial oyster stout!
 

foxy

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For a novice willing to learn, John Palmer How to Brew. Followed by Dave Millers Home Brewing Guide. It is also worth reading Brewing Better Beer by Gordon Strong. For technical books it is worth searching the web for free downloads some are as much as $300 AUD.
 

Wobbly13

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Started with John Palmer which is everything you could ever need but perhaps too deep for a beginner. Liked Charlie Papazian’s The Complete Joy of Homebrewing, though rather folksy in places & perhaps dated. One I have found that no one else has mentioned and covers everything from basics to recipes and beyond, plus has 1Gallon and 5 Gallon instructions is Brew Better Beer: Learn (and Break) the Rules for Making Ipas, Sours, Pilsners, Stouts, and More by Emma Christensen.
 

SilverShadow

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I doubt very much if there is a "one size fits all" homebrewing book available. During my many years of brewing I've collected quite a lot of brewing books, and I've learnt something from all of them. In recent years I've bought several of the American books, e.g. How to Brew (John Palmer), Brewing Classic Styles (Zainasheff & Palmer) and Mastering Homebrew (Randy Mosher). They are all very good, and up to date with modern beer styles/trends.
Of these three I would say that "How to Brew" is the most detailed and thorough. I would suggest this one for somebody with a technical mind who is just starting out, although there is plenty there for the more experienced homebrewer as well.
"Brewing Classic Styles" is mainly recipes, but with enough supporting information to steer the homebrewer in the right direction. This book is ideal for the more experienced homebrewer, but probably not for a beginner.
"Mastering Homebrew" has a refreshing "lower tech" approach (compared to "How to Brew") with lots of diagrams and graphics which makes it easy to read and easy to follow. It's not full of "clone" recipes, but offers plenty of guidance on how to achieve the characteristic flavour profiles of most popular beer styles. I really like this book.

Good luck athumb..
This sounds like the perfect starting out book for me. I'm very much a visual person, especially when trying to read words after I've had a few 😜

I also like the concept of what to look for when creating certain beer styles - I love my IPAs and pale ales, so hopefully this would give me a great overview
 

SilverShadow

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Mastering Homebrew by Randy Mosher is a good book.
Cheers Dave.

As I'm still new to brewing I haven't invested heavily in specialist kit, opting for a slightly more budget approach till I master the basics

Sounds like this book may be ideal, as a non technical approach may lend itself better to my set-up
 
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