Reverse Osmosis

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KegThat

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Hey all,

We have a new in stock reverse osmosis unit available cheaper than competition. It is on backorder so there will be a 3 week delay but grab yourself a bargain if you want to preorder!

Reverse osmosis is a water purification process designed to remove 98-99% of impurities from the water that enters the system. The DI (deionisation) stage on the unit polishes the water to further remove the impurities and bring the TDS (total dissolved solids) of the water to 0. This gives the user a blank canvas to build their chemistry and profile depending the on the beer they wish to brew.



Cheers
 
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Braufather

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Hi, do you Know what the wastage is with this system? ie how much tap water is need to make one litre of RO water.

cheers
 

KegThat

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Hi, do you Know what the wastage is with this system? ie how much tap water is need to make one litre of RO water.

cheers
Good question. With the RO-50MP as it is a pumped system and the membrane is receiving the correct flow and pressure to perform efficiently, the waste to pure ratio is three litres of waste for every one lite of pure, so four litres of tap water for one litre of pure water. This is slightly better than industry standard which can be 4/5:1.


With the compact 4 stage, it relies on mains water pressure so if the mains pressure is sufficient you will achieve the same result, if not the waste can be slightly more. (This product not on the site yet but will be by eod)

Cheers!
 
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Why does it "waste" water? What happens to it? Can it be saved? Is it good for anything else?
It’s perfectly usable water.

Tap water goes into the RO machine, pure water comes out of one pipe, “waste” comes out of another. If the RO machine produces 3 litres of waste for every litre of pure water then in principle each litre of waste water is normal tap water but with 33% more minerals - this being the minerals removed from the purified output.

It works like this (simplified diagram).

058A9E61-19F9-48A6-A848-AA74E1525ABD.jpeg

Tap water comes into a chamber and would flow straight out the bottom except there’s a restriction so pressure builds in the chamber. The pressurised water is squeezed through a membrane that has holes big enough for water molecules to pass through but too small for minerals and dissolved solids to pass through so they can only flow out through the waste output.
 

KegThat

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It’s perfectly usable water.

Tap water goes into the RO machine, pure water comes out of one pipe, “waste” comes out of another. If the RO machine produces 3 litres of waste for every litre of pure water then in principle each litre of waste water is normal tap water but with 33% more minerals - this being the minerals removed from the purified output.

It works like this (simplified diagram).

View attachment 71318
Tap water comes into a chamber and would flow straight out the bottom except there’s a restriction so pressure builds in the chamber. The pressurised water is squeezed through a membrane that has holes big enough for water molecules to pass through but too small for minerals and dissolved solids to pass through so they can only flow out through the waste output.
Thanks for the diagram, i was writing something up but this is a great explanation! As for price I've been told off for being too cheap! If anyone wants to pre order one please send me an email and I can see what I can do until they are in stock.
 
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I should say the waste water from the RO machine might even be better tasting water than regular tap water because before the membrane the water will have been through a sediment filter and an activated carbon filter so will have been mostly stripped of chlorine and other pollutants.
 
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…let’s not sell ourselves short. Put it in clear plastic bottles and sell it as a rich source of essential minerals. Maybe even use a green coloured label to imply good health and ecological values and put a picture of a happy family on it.

Also in another bottle with a “sports cap” and a picture of a runner and some words about rehydration, replacing salts and minerals…

I think we may be on to a winner! 😂
 

KegThat

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…let’s not sell ourselves short. Put it in clear plastic bottles and sell it as a rich source of essential minerals. Maybe even use a green coloured label to imply good health and ecological values and put a picture of a happy family on it.

Also in another bottle with a “sports cap” and a picture of a runner and some words about rehydration, replacing salts and minerals…

I think we may be on to a winner! 😂
Now we're really on to something! But have we exposed the many blatant scams under our noses at the supermarkets??
 

KegThat

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It’s perfectly usable water.

Tap water goes into the RO machine, pure water comes out of one pipe, “waste” comes out of another. If the RO machine produces 3 litres of waste for every litre of pure water then in principle each litre of waste water is normal tap water but with 33% more minerals - this being the minerals removed from the purified output.

It works like this (simplified diagram).

View attachment 71318
Tap water comes into a chamber and would flow straight out the bottom except there’s a restriction so pressure builds in the chamber. The pressurised water is squeezed through a membrane that has holes big enough for water molecules to pass through but too small for minerals and dissolved solids to pass through so they can only flow out through the waste output.

Supplier came back with this, looks close!

The mains water is forced through the RO membrane under pressure with pure water coming out of one outlet and concentrated wastewater, containing 95-98% of the molecules and contaminants that were in the original water, going to drain. The wastewater can be used to water the garden or top up the cistern in a toilet. They are a couple of examples I have come across in recent years. The wastewater can’t be recirculated through this system as it will be a lot more concentrated than the original feed water so the filters and membrane within the unit would deteriorate a lot quicker.

The filters on these units need to be replaced every 6 months and the membrane every 12 months. The resin can’t be calculated as it depends on too many variables. This is why it is a colour changing resin, so the user is given a visual indication of when the resin has depleted.
 

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Brewnaldo

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Kust realised we got loads of those RO units in work but they're quite big....the filter cartridges are about 3ft long.
I'll just hang out here for the PM offering the knock off one for cheap then
 

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