Rice wine anybody ? I got 2 years old rice wine that stuck.. smells so aromatic; but sweet like syrup

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andrew_ysk

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Just now i opened my cabinet and a fragrant sweet smell overwhelmed me, can't resist myself to take the old "wine/ syrup" to have a try if it has turned into alcohol fully.
I tasted it: bursting with fragrant of rice wine but sweet like syrup. I bet the ABV is super low, lower than beer.
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Attached a photo just to let you see how beautiful clear is the liquid.. Brix=36.6% (half of lowest honey brix [70%] ), SG=1.130 .
I don't know have i posted in this forum before (don't know how to do a search on all topic started post by myself)..
Last time i made this rice wine using "angel yeast" for rice. I pitch in the yeast powder directly onto steamed glutinous rice without any water added.. Hence rice sugar syrup is the result (because no yeast able to survive). asad. That time i was thinking : i want to make pure rice wine without diluting with water (i thought adding water is just cut cost and play cheap).

Since then, I have tried to save it once, by taken out a small volume of it and added water and pitch in wine yeast.. but the result was disgusting. Hence the remaining of the "syrup" was left in the cabinet until today..
I believed The reason why the "test" tasted disgusting, MOST probably due to "syrup" and water dilution is not right ( i simply have no idea how much water to add).

I Don't know how to take measurement with rice wine.. The reason being, the first day rice and yeast (this is no normal grape yeast) and water were added in, there is totally zero sweetness (because the enzyme has just barely starting to turn starch into sugar).
3 days onward, the liquid will become sweeter and sweeter until syrup sweetness level (i believe part of the yeast are starting to turn the simultaneously produced sugar into alcohol). Also no idea the sugar produced is 100% yeast fermentable sugar or partial none fermentable sugar.
Hence no idea to use hydrometer to take measurement of the sugar level is accurate or not (due to "probably none fermentable sugar).
Also No idea when is the peak of the sweetness (because some yeast are constantly simultaneously fermenting the sugar released by enzyme from rice starch).

Anybody have tried this, please share idea. Thanks

Anybody tried that before ?
I think rice yeast might able to do the wheat grain (such as grain that used to produce beer). Maybe try that one day.
 

johncrobinson

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Its known as "parallel fermentation" The idea being that the sugar is formed by the koji fungus from the rice starch at the SAME time as the yeast is converting said sugar to alcohol.
High alcohol can be formed as at no point is the yeast inhibited by high sugar levels,(If done correctly)

Beer on the other hand is mashed to convert the starch into sugar BEFORE the start of fermentation by yeast.

I have never used these (Chinese) i belive rice balls.
Instead I made koji koy rice and then fermented that with wine yeast type ec-1118.
 

andrew_ysk

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koji koy rice
Koji koy rice ? How do you make that ? any video that i can follow thru ?
I have never used these (Chinese) i belive rice balls.
I wasn't using chinese rice ball, i used those rice grain innoculated with green mold (purchased from some old man from china who make rice wine)
I believe it is same/ almost same as koji..
 

andrew_ysk

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Its known as "parallel fermentation" The idea being that the sugar is formed by the koji fungus from the rice starch at the SAME time as the yeast is converting said sugar to alcohol.
High alcohol can be formed as at no point is the yeast inhibited by high sugar levels,(If done correctly)

Beer on the other hand is mashed to convert the starch into sugar BEFORE the start of fermentation by yeast.

I have never used these (Chinese) i belive rice balls.
Instead I made koji koy rice and then fermented that with wine yeast type ec-1118.
Any idea, judging by the amount of sweetness i have measured, how much dilution i can make to produce highest possible rice wine ? i think 14-18%abv should be good with rice wine. i Just need to dilute it down and pitch in more rice grain innoculated with the rice yeast .. But i am not sure how much to dilute it down so that will get high abv (don't want rice wine to spoil).
 

andrew_ysk

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Beer on the other hand is mashed to convert the starch into sugar BEFORE the start of fermentation by yeast.
This is the type i have not learn yet.. how to convert the starch of wheat into sugar in beer making process ?
I thought it is to germinate the grain and then grind them.. I believe germination of grain convert starch into sugar
 

johncrobinson

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Up to and even exceeding 20%abv is possible I belive.

Alcohol is produced AT THE SAME TIME AS THE SUGAR is the key difference.
This differs from normal as in most cases all the sugar is added at the start of the winemaking process.
High sugar can inhibit yeast same as high alcohol.

What you bought probibally was koji.
Mine was a greenish powder to be spinkled over cooked rice.

Germinating grain to produce malt is not often done by the homebrewer,Though its not impossibe to do so,The grain is normally bought ready malted.
 

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