Should I be worried

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Tinlife

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Hi All,
Tinlife here!

I recently put on 22litres of the Canadian Ale from Wilko - used 1kg of dry malt, 250g of brewing sugar, and dry hopped from day one (which I suspect was a bad idea).
Bottled it on day 7 which was yesterday after 2 days of the same reading. I wanted to wait longer but I also want a decent load at hand over xmas. Bottled in the 750ml Coopers plastic bottles, with 3 of the wilko carbonation tablets in each, and put them under the sink to condition. This morning I've checked and several of the bottles are already rockhard. I've never had them firm up so fast. Does this sound like an explosive bottle situation??
 

the baron

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It does sound like you may have in a ideal world bottled too early. You can release some of the pressure by gently opening the top and then re-tighten.
The good point is they are plastic bottles so no flying glass, so just keep an eye on them and release pressure where essential is my thoughts
 
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With two gravity readings the same, that part's fine. It does sound explosive with the drops. Where'd you get the info to do three carb drops for 750ml?
I'm happy you're using plastic. That's what will save you, being able to release the pressure.
 

Tinlife

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The packet says 2 drops for 500ml hence my decision to add three...not a good one it would seem!
I've just released the pressure from every bottle and re-sealed. I suspect I'm going to either end up with bombs when I open them or I release the pressure several times and end up with flat and off tasting ale :(
 
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I'm going to either end up with bombs when I open them or I release the pressure several times and end up with flat and off tasting ale
That could happen but it's not an "either/or." Once should do it, two at the most. The CO2 will dissolve into the liquid. You also have the option, once they are carbonated, to refrigerate which will stop the process.
 

Tinlife

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That could happen but it's not an "either/or." Once should do it, two at the most. The CO2 will dissolve into the liquid. You also have the option, once they are carbonated, to refrigerate which will stop the process.
Thanks! Hoping the release I did earlier is enough then. I'll do the refrigeration bit as well - try and get them as calm as possible. Lesson learned - leave the ale long enough in the FV and don't add 3 drops!
 
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I wouldn't bottle any beer after just 7 days in the FV. I work on a minimum of 10, but would more normally leave for 2 weeks. As others have said, 3 carbonation drops per 750ml bottle is quite a lot of sugar. Your saving grace is the plastic bottles, but I'd still cover/wrap them in a blanket, or plastic sheet if you have one, so that if any of them 'pop', you can at least keep the liquid contained.

As you've opened each bottle and released the pressure, I'd now leave them for a total of 2 weeks, then get them outside in a shed if you have one. Leave them there for another 2 weeks (I appreciate you'll want to bring some in for Christmas) and open each one carefully! They're going to be lively so do it over the sink as I suspect they'll gush a bit.

At the end of the day, I'm sure you'll end up with something perfectly drinkable, but in future always remember that patience is a brewer's best friend. Good luck!
 

Tinlife

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I wouldn't bottle any beer after just 7 days in the FV. I work on a minimum of 10, but would more normally leave for 2 weeks. As others have said, 3 carbonation drops per 750ml bottle is quite a lot of sugar. Your saving grace is the plastic bottles, but I'd still cover/wrap them in a blanket, or plastic sheet if you have one, so that if any of them 'pop', you can at least keep the liquid contained.

As you've opened each bottle and released the pressure, I'd now leave them for a total of 2 weeks, then get them outside in a shed if you have one. Leave them there for another 2 weeks (I appreciate you'll want to bring some in for Christmas) and open each one carefully! They're going to be lively so do it over the sink as I suspect they'll gush a bit.

At the end of the day, I'm sure you'll end up with something perfectly drinkable, but in future always remember that patience is a brewer's best friend. Good luck!

Much appreciated! Blanket going over now!
 

Stevieboy

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On a more serious note, it's not just about the same gravity 2 days on the trot - longer time in the FV helps clear up the beer of all sorts of taints etc, and will be clearer come packaging time. I recently pressure barreled an Evil Dog DIPA that was in the FV for 3 whole weeks, and after just 14 days it was crystal clear - serving from a bottom tap.
 
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leave the ale long enough in the FV
Opinions may vary but two checks with the hydrometer a couple days apart is the correct action and prevents over-carbonation. Beer can be done fermenting in a few days. The "long enough" in this case should apply to allowing the yeast to clean up after itself. Two weeks in the fermenter is pretty usual advice.
I do mostly high-octane beers (9%-plus ABV) and I leave the fermenter alone for 21 days. However, many of the brewers on the sister site go "grain to glass" in a week but that's with kegging.
 

Tinlife

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Since posting and getting all of your very helpful responses I have opened every bottle 4 times. Why 4? Because I wasn't sure how long to open them for so each time was longer than the last until I found a level which seemed to flatten the fizz somewhat. Each time I left the cap on and just loosened it. I figured this would have kept any contamination out as I recently brewed a turbo cider in the same way and it was clean (5ltr water bottle with the cap loosely on).
The only thing I haven't done yet is move them from under the sink. I put them back - wrapped - as I'm hoping they'll still condition under there but in a safe way now they've had a breather! Let's see!
 

the baron

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A tip if you think you may get the odd bottle bomb put the bottles in a beer crate stood on old towels and drape a old towel over the top it will contain a bomb.
Me personally I would keep releasing the pressure as any potential bomb is one too many
 

Tinlife

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A tip if you think you may get the odd bottle bomb put the bottles in a beer crate stood on old towels and drape a old towel over the top it will contain a bomb.
Me personally I would keep releasing the pressure as any potential bomb is one too many
Do you think if I keep releasing the pressure there's a point at which I can stop releasing it or will I be doing this daily until enough time has passed for me to stick them in the shed in what I think is a conditioned state?
 
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