so who gets gout..

Discussion in 'The Snug' started by artyb, Jan 23, 2014.

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  1. Jan 23, 2014 #1

    artyb

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    i have suffered very mildly with gout for around a year, :(

    its restricted to the big toes ,
    a numb pain with flare ups every now and then.....
    i can tell you its not reccomended ... :nono:

    one of the triggers for gout can be yeast,
    and real ale come high on the list of things to avoid... :doh:
     
  2. Jan 23, 2014 #2

    artyb

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  3. Jan 23, 2014 #3

    TRXnMe

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    I have a form of gout on the pointing finger on my right had, it's a bony lump next to the first knuckle.

    My GP gave me a list of foods to reduce / eliminate, alchohol was on the list :(

    I'd already cut back on booze, so am reducing the amount of fats and salts in my diet, making a few 'smart swaps' to make it easy.

    The lump is half the size it was when I first took it to my GP and getting better, so I can continue with the odd pint :)
     
  4. Jan 23, 2014 #4

    CaptainMallard

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    I got a little pain in my hands around Christmas when I drank a couple of bottles of port, and a couple of bottles of red wine, and a bottle of . . . :drunk:
    It's gone now, but I'm taking it easy, partly because work is keeping me very busy. :(
     
  5. Jan 24, 2014 #5

    adomant

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    In all honesty get it checked out by a Rheumatologist - you can get referred on NHS if you are persistent.

    GPs tend to prescribe anti inflammatories which just deal with the short term pain and there is likely a lot of harm going on that you can't feel.

    High Uric acid levels are the cause and although changing diet (cherry juice etc) helps it is not a major factor.

    Alcohol is a big factor as it not only produces high levels of Uric acid, it prevents the body from clearing it.

    If you have had several attacks or have lumps in any joints then this is tophaecious gout and is only going to get worse and eventually may kill your kidneys.

    I had a few attacks over the years and wasn't in any particular pain but it turned out that I had 10 years of crystals built up in my elbow and knee which had to be surgically removed.

    My condition is totally reversible now that I am on allopurinol and colchicine (initially) and I can eat and drink what I want (although I am more conscious of when and how much I drink now).

    Unless you are willing to go teetotal you should get a long term treatment such as allapurinol even if it is not always painful.

    If you continue to drink (as I do) then you must not get dehydrated (a pint of beer dehydrates you by half a pint of water, including the water in the beer).
     
  6. Jan 24, 2014 #6

    markmark

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  7. Jan 24, 2014 #7

    artyb

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    that seems to be some sound advice,
    i personally have very little pain,
    but im aware of the long term problems that can be associated with gout

    i heard that a considered diet is the first shot at treatment,
    as the medical treatments have side effects .. :hmm:
     
  8. Jan 24, 2014 #8

    TRXnMe

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    My GP is a good egg. He spent a good 20 minutes with me once he'd told me the lump was a form of gout, not gout per se, but a related disease. He gave me the list of foods to cut out or drastically reduce, explained about drugs and potential side effects and then showed me photos of his hands 5 years ago with the same lumps I've got one of, his diet changes worked, I'll follow his advice on this :)

    Two big things he did stress: -

    Firstly, drink LOTS of water, as in 3 to 4 pints a day, tea, coffee and beer don't count as liquid, for every pint of those I should add half a pint to my 4 daily pints (I pee one hell of a lot on Saturdays.....)

    Secondly, avoid all salty foods, this was bigger for me than cutting back on beer as I love salt on my food and push the daily limit to, well, the limit. I get around it by using chilli, black pepper, and curry powder (all salt free) and use the low sodium salt when a food really wont do without salt :)

    My GP reckons I'll have the lump for another year to 18 months, but the diet change has to stick forever if I want it to stay gone :(
     
  9. Feb 25, 2016 #9

    Dutto

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  10. Feb 25, 2016 #10

    hoptoit

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    I think I came to the conclusion after trying to eat healthy, but always getting a gout attack. "Eat fish and chips, swilled down with a few beers"
    Especially after the time I got it in my knee.
     
  11. Feb 25, 2016 #11

    Godsdog

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    It was rightly called the rich mans complaint as 100 odd years back the only folk that could pig out was the wealthy,whereas the poor folk never got it because they were reared on the stuff off the land like broth and stews made with root vegetables, no purines in gruel,
     
  12. Feb 25, 2016 #12

    Dutto

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    Gruel?? :doh:

    They were lucky mate ... we had to make do with a handful of hot gravel! :whistle::whistle:

    [ame]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Xe1a1wHxTyo[/ame]
     
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  13. Nov 12, 2019 #13

    Chippy_Tea

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    The subject has been mentioned again so I have bumped this old thread.
    I said in another thread a couple of years ago I have had it in the past but couldn't put it down to a single thing, we'll it turns out for me its lager I stopped drinking it a while ago a d haven't had gout since.
     
    Last edited: Nov 12, 2019
  14. Nov 12, 2019 #14

    An Ankoù

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    We're becoming a medical forum then?
    1- Patient wants to know how much of RDA of vitamins and minerals in brewers yeast
    3- Patient falls in love with hospital porter
    4- Hernia
    5-Patient has concerns about her last procedure
    6- Is it really cool to be sterilised?
    7- How many litres can I drink before I fall over?
    8- Gout
    9- Poly-tunnel vision. Is there a cure
    10- Grandad's got the bath plug stuck up his buḿ again

    :beer1:
     
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  15. Nov 12, 2019 #15

    Tony C

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    Been on Allopurinol for years, so only had one or two attacks in the last five years, but before I got on that....
    Hips, knees,, ankles, elbows, wrists, fingers obviously toes and just about anywhere else you care to think of. Not good, add in chronic back pain, it's no wonder I drink.

    Cheers TC
     
  16. Nov 12, 2019 #16

    Clint

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    Poly tunnel vision...ha! I've got that!
     
  17. Nov 13, 2019 #17

    abacab666

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    I had some nasty gout over the years, tried allopurinol which, rather than preventing it, actually made it more frequent and more aggressive. Now have colchicine which works as a curative, rather than a preventative. 2 a day at first twitches, rarely gets to day 3. Touch wood, I've been all but attack free for about 3 years now, apart from one evil bugger, brought on by, believe it or not, too much cauliflower, but I'm still watching what I eat and drink as a precaution...
     
  18. Nov 13, 2019 #18

    Chippy_Tea

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    Dietary Management of Gout

    https://www.arthritis.org/living-wi...s/expert-q-a/gout-questions/food-for-gout.php


    The primary dietary modification traditionally recommended is a low-purine diet. Avoiding purines completely is impossible, but strive to limit them. People with gout should learn by trial and error what their personal limit is and which foods cause problems.

    Laura Rall, PhD, nutrition researcher at Tufts University in Boston, says, "Begin by eliminating foods in the 'high-purine' category while reducing your intake of foods in the 'moderate-purine' category. If you don't have gout attacks after trying this, you may add more foods from the 'moderate' category or occasionally try a food from the 'high' category. Using these guidelines, you may be able to determine a safe level of purine consumption and enjoy some of your favourite foods without experiencing attacks."

    High-Purine Foods Include:
    • Alcoholic beverages (all types)
    • Some fish, seafood and shellfish, including anchovies, sardines, herring, mussels, codfish, scallops, trout and haddock
    • Some meats, such as bacon, turkey, veal, venison and organ meats like liver

    • Moderate Purine Foods Include:
    • Meats, such as beef, chicken, duck, pork and ham
    • Shellfish, such as crab, lobster, oysters and shrimp
     
  19. Nov 13, 2019 #19

    davidfromUS

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    Had to Google what it was. Sounds completely awful. My joints are now aching after reading.
     
  20. Nov 13, 2019 #20

    Chippy_Tea

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    Believe me it is, i describe it as feeling like someone is trying to remove the end of your big toe at the joint using a red hot knife, i am glad i finally found out what caused mine.
     
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