Softening Water

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Northern_Brewer

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Presumably aquarium shops are covered by the "pet shops" exemption so should still be open if your local one has RO water?

I've not heard anyone using the likes of Spotless Water who have self-service RO water from ISO containers so in principle you could get it whilst social distancing. It's mainly aimed at window cleaners but also cater to aquariums, so isn't officially food-safe but in the real world it should be fine for brewing given that it will be boiled for an hour, and more responsible than taking Ashbeck from people who might need it for drinking. Cheaper too - 3.5p per litre.

But I would say respect your terroir and just brew porter....
 

strange-steve

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I thought I read somewhere to try to keep each below 100 but perhaps I could go higher?
Not only could you, but for some styles arguably you should. Have a look at Graham Wheeler's water calculator here, specifically the target profiles in the drop down menu. You'll be surprised at how high the suggested levels are, and recently I've been increasing the amount of chloride in my beers and really liking the results.
 

SteveH

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Not only could you, but for some styles arguably you should. Have a look at Graham Wheeler's water calculator here, specifically the target profiles in the drop down menu. You'll be surprised at how high the suggested levels are, and recently I've been increasing the amount of chloride in my beers and really liking the results.
Interesting, thanks - putting my numbers in there results in a much higher CRS adjustment than I've ever used so far (36ml for the bitter profile), and also much larger adjustment with salts.
 

Northern_Brewer

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I agree that working with your tap water is generally a better approach, but I think it'd be a shame to limit your brewing styles.
That might be true normally, but I think just at the moment we're in special circumstances where we don't necessarily have the luxury of choice, for a few weeks at least. And personally I quite like being limited to some extent - particularly when it comes to seasons, I like to feel the rhythm of the year.
 
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An Ankoù

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I am going to use tap water, (Anglia Water very hard), due to being unable to purchase enough of Tesco Ashbeck water for a lager water. I normally add salts through Beersmith water profile.
I have put my "hard" water profile into Beersmith atnd it is not coming up with any additions.I was expecting it to suggest adding something like lactic acid to reduce the hardness. Please can anybody suggest a solution?
Thank you.
I don't know what the weather's like in your neck of the woods, but whenever I wanted to brew a Pilsner, I waited for rain and collected rainwater. The water in Poole being too hard for Pilsners. I drilled a small hole in the gutter and put a bung in it when not in use. I'd let it rain for half an hour or so to wash the air and the roof and away we go. Never bought bottled water, although now I do for topping up as it's more convenient that boiling and cooling. Rain water is perfectly soft so for anything other than Pilsner, you'll need to add salts.
If your water contains a high degree of "temporary hardness" -HCO3 ins you can boil the water to improve this, although it's fine for stouts and porters. If the water's permanently hard CaCO3 then it's fine for Burton style bitters.
This is my understanding of the matter, anyway.
 
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