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Sterilising Question re Sodium Procarbonate

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Fat Spider

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In the past I've always used Sodium Metabisulphite to sterilise bottles prior to bottling, I also used it to keep fermentation vessels "ready" by keeping a little in the bottom. Today I was unable to get hold of any "Sulphite" and was offered Sodium Procarbonate instead, which I've not encountered before. My question is when it comes to fermentation buckets how good is it as a brief contact steriliser or do I literally have to fill a 5 litre bucket and wait for it to work, also is it really a no rinse product when it comes to sterilising bottles?
 

uDicko

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I always rinse Sodium Percarbonate. I use to remove all the crud from FV after use.

I find it leaves a residue that does need rinsing. Don't fancy that on my beer.
 

Hopsteep

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It's a cleaner not a steriliser
I’m with you on this mate, but a lot of people seem to use it as a no rinse steriliser which I don’t really understand 😬
 

Sadfield

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I’m with you on this mate, but a lot of people seem to use it as a no rinse steriliser which I don’t really understand 😬
It breaks down into sodium carbonate and hydrogen peroxide, which at suitable concentration and contact time is a sanitiser. It's just isn't as quick or efficient as other products. Hydrogen peroxide isn't very stable though and will eventually decompose to water and oxygen leaving the sodium carbonate, which is a harmless food additive (E500) and water softener. Making it no rinse.
 

Mavroz

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As others do, I only use percarbonate for cleaning, rinsing well after use. Never used this as a sanitiser, I use Starsan for this.
 

An Ankoù

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Hydrogen peroxide isn't very stable though and will eventually decompose to water and oxygen
Yes it will, but you don't want it in your beer. I did a bit of Google research a year or so ago about using H2O2 to oxygenated the wort. I don't remember why, but it was a big no, no. I don't use it, but if I did, I'd rinse.
 

lancon

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I think the rinsing depends on whether your water is soft or hard. Hard water reacts with the sodium carbonate to give limescale, if you let it dry without rinsing then a white stain.
 

Sadfield

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Yes it will, but you don't want it in your beer. I did a bit of Google research a year or so ago about using H2O2 to oxygenated the wort. I don't remember why, but it was a big no, no. I don't use it, but if I did, I'd rinse.
Completely different kettle of fish, adding hydrogen peroxide directly to wort, compared to the residual, diluted amount from a drained fv.:rolleyes:
 

Fat Spider

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Thank you for the replies, looks like the percarbonate will be saved for cleaning, until I can get hold of some Metabisulphite it looks like I'll be crushing some campden tablets as I have a 30 bottles of red clearing.
 

Ale House Rock

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It breaks down into sodium carbonate and hydrogen peroxide, which at suitable concentration and contact time is a sanitiser. It's just isn't as quick or efficient as other products. Hydrogen peroxide isn't very stable though and will eventually decompose to water and oxygen leaving the sodium carbonate, which is a harmless food additive (E500) and water softener. Making it no rinse.
Correct
 
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