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Zephyr259

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Also the suggested profiles in the OP are probably quite conservative as far as mineral content goes, I have been gradually increasing the amount of chloride especially in my brews and really liking the results.
Hi @strange-steve , I'm brewing a Scottish 60/- tomorrow, thinking of bumping the chloride further than Brun' water's 65 mg/l vs 55 mg/l sulphate, any opinion of how high I should go?
 

strange-steve

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Hi @strange-steve , I'm brewing a Scottish 60/- tomorrow, thinking of bumping the chloride further than Brun' water's 65 mg/l vs 55 mg/l sulphate, any opinion of how high I should go?
It's not a style I have a lot of experience with tbh, my one attempt a few years ago was pretty poor. However for a low gravity, malt-focused beer I'd probably go pretty high with the chloride, maybe 150 - 200 ppm, and keep the sulphate low.
 

Zephyr259

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It's not a style I have a lot of experience with tbh, my one attempt a few years ago was pretty poor. However for a low gravity, malt-focused beer I'd probably go pretty high with the chloride, maybe 150 - 200 ppm, and keep the sulphate low.
Cool, thanks. Pretty aggressive on the chloride then. Might try 150 Cl to 50 SO4 and see how that turns out. I was thinking your dark Belgian profile might be decent for this and seems I may have been along the right track.
 

EarthKveik

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It's not a style I have a lot of experience with tbh, my one attempt a few years ago was pretty poor. However for a low gravity, malt-focused beer I'd probably go pretty high with the chloride, maybe 150 - 200 ppm, and keep the sulphate low.
It's a style I've brewed a few times now, albeit with kveik yeast using a profile of approx 120-150ppm Ca and a 2:1 Chloride:Sulphate. Chloride's been in the 150-200ppm range. Presently using 160ppm.
 

EarthKveik

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Thanks for the opinion guys, and yeah I don't want it too thin as the previous time when I made a dark mild to a similar mid 3% abv it wasn't great due to lack of body.
A traditional way to build body in these beers is to decoct a portion of the wort off and boil it down a fraction. This builds a carbohydrate profile that's heavier on caramelised and otherwise less fermentable sugars. I'm presently fermenting a wee heavy in which I took the first third of the wort and boiled it down to a quarter of its original volume.

For a light ale like you're doing I'd take the first third and concentrate it between a quarter and a third depending on its depth of colour and how fast it's changing. Personally I like a golden light ale, so I don't put in any roasted adjuncts.

For the wee heavy I put some double roast crystal in the main boil at the 60 min mark. I think next time I will put it in 10 minutes from the end, it shed its colour pretty quickly and was a really nice red-brown at first. Flavour profile seems good so far.

I'm new to brewing and am mostly making 5L batches while I refine my skills and recipes. You might prefer to take the first quarter of the wort if you are dealing with a lot of liquid.

Here are a couple of articles you might find helpful.

 

Zephyr259

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A traditional way to build body in these beers is to decoct a portion of the wort off and boil it down a fraction. This builds a carbohydrate profile that's heavier on caramelised and otherwise less fermentable sugars. I'm presently fermenting a wee heavy in which I took the first third of the wort and boiled it down to a quarter of its original volume.

For a light ale like you're doing I'd take the first third and concentrate it between a quarter and a third depending on its depth of colour and how fast it's changing. Personally I like a golden light ale, so I don't put in any roasted adjuncts.

For the wee heavy I put some double roast crystal in the main boil at the 60 min mark. I think next time I will put it in 10 minutes from the end, it shed its colour pretty quickly and was a really nice red-brown at first. Flavour profile seems good so far.

I'm new to brewing and am mostly making 5L batches while I refine my skills and recipes. You might prefer to take the first quarter of the wort if you are dealing with a lot of liquid.

Here are a couple of articles you might find helpful.

Thanks for the info, I've boiled down first runnings quite a few times now as it's a way to partially mimic decoction for bocks. Amusingly, that link is the recipe I'm brewing. Also using DRC instead of his darker crystal but not in the boil.

We should probably stop de-railing Steve's thread now. :-) Feel free to pm me if you want to chat further.
 

EarthKveik

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Thanks for the info, I've boiled down first runnings quite a few times now as it's a way to partially mimic decoction for bocks. Amusingly, that link is the recipe I'm brewing. Also using DRC instead of his darker crystal but not in the boil.

We should probably stop de-railing Steve's thread now. :-) Feel free to pm me if you want to chat further.
Good for you, it's a versatile technique. Sorry if that derailed the thread a wee bit, hope your batch turns out well :-)
 

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