The art of parking.

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Chippy_Tea

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I need to print a few of these :laugh8:



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TonyT

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There's "logic" in that illogical parking job--he's moved forward enough to stay out of the driving pathway even while disregarding the obvious, raised boundary.
Is that a UK license plate? I don't recall seeing personal trucks very often if at all.
There didn’t used to be, but they’re far more commonplace now. They just don’t take up as much room as a Dodge Ram. Having said that, a bloke down the road from me‘s got a jacked up F150. At least while driving around Welsh lanes he can probably see over the tops of the hedgerow!
 
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There didn’t used to be, but they’re far more commonplace now. They just don’t take up as much room as a Dodge Ram. Having said that, a bloke down the road from me‘s got a jacked up F150. At least while driving around Welsh lanes he can probably see over the tops of the hedgerow!
Thanks, I thought that was the case. Aside from work trucks (lorries?), I thought the UK might have a regulation or two limiting them.
I got to drive a new, giant, Ford F-Series for a job which was just to transport the truck itself from Detroit to Philadelphia.
That thing was HUGE. It felt like driving a bus (which I have). It took an hour or more of driving it to get comfortable. Driving it was very fun, I admit.
Probably 95% of the people here who own those giant ones don't need them.
 

TonyT

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Thanks, I thought that was the case. Aside from work trucks (lorries?), I thought the UK might have a regulation or two limiting them.
I got to drive a new, giant, Ford F-Series for a job which was just to transport the truck itself from Detroit to Philadelphia.
That thing was HUGE. It felt like driving a bus (which I have). It took an hour or more of driving it to get comfortable. Driving it was very fun, I admit.
Probably 95% of the people here who own those giant ones don't need them.
95% eh? That’s a lot of penis extensions!
 
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95% eh? That’s a lot of penis extensions!
Pretty much. Massive SUVs are waaay out of hand too but that seems more "keeping up with the Joneses."
Pulling out of a parking space, needless to say, is always an adventure since you can't see anything until your car is halfway out of the spot. So I go slowly and hope nobody hits me.
I thought we had a pretty big vehicle (it's an HHR) but it looks tiny when compared to all the trucks and SUVs.
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I beg to differ as here there are a lot of parking lots at retail parks who are managed by third parties and impose fines for parking like this or over staying your parking time which does vary.
Does anyone ever pay them ? Private company with no enforcement route apart from civil action. Roll up and throw in the bin
 

Chippy_Tea

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Does anyone ever pay them ? Private company with no enforcement route apart from civil action. Roll up and throw in the bin

Private firms that run car parks for supermarkets, hospitals, shopping centres, railway stations and others can fine motorists who overstay the time they have paid for.
A long legal campaign to stop them doing so ended in failure recently in the Supreme Court.


The case was brought by Essex fish and chip shop owner Barry Beavis.


He had challenged the right of the private firm ParkingEye to impose an £85 penalty after he stayed for nearly three hours in a shopping-centre car park that allowed two hours’ free parking but charged a penalty for overstaying. His claim, supported by many campaigners and legal experts, was that private firms had no legal right to impose a penalty beyond the extra cost the firm incurred because he had stayed an extra hour.

In November 2015, the Supreme Court ruled by a majority that firms could impose a charge for overstaying. That was necessary, the Justices said, ‘for the efficient management of the space in the interests of the general body of users’.

If the car park firm could charge only a nominal amount – perhaps at the normal rate for parking – then people would routinely overstay and the car park would not be as available as it should be.

Companies can only fine a 'reasonable' amount

The ruling does not give private firms a free hand.

The Justices said that the £85 charge was ‘neither extravagant nor unconscionable’ but they did not set out what would be a reasonable charge for overstaying.

They pointed out that the ParkingEye charge was similar to local authority penalties – from £60 in Scotland to £130 in parts of London. So if a firm imposes £85 or so – perhaps more in London – it is highly unlikely that any lower court would refuse to enforce the penalty if the parker refused to pay.

Mr Beavis is campaigning for the Government to introduce new laws to set out what private parking firms can charge, as it does for local councils.

 
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