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The Mad Russian - Imperial Stout

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Ajhutch

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Great thread this, sounds like a really good result from the brewday. Fingers crossed for a good fermentation athumb..
 

F00b4r

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Did you split your malts 50/50 for the mashes or move all the dark grains to the initial mash in an attempt to control pH of both mashes? I know you said you did add salts to the second mash but it was a little sparse on the details.
It will be interesting to see how that yeast copes. I did the 14.5% from James Morton's Brew book and stupidly switched out the Nottingham yeast for CML equivalent, without thinking about changed alcohol tolerance and it died at about 9.5%. I tried pitching Brett C in to finish it but the alcohol level just killed it stone dead without it moving even a point. By the way for that beer James recommends pitching at about 30% above what the calculators say; maybe not so relevant for you but if others are using other yeasts for similar beers.
 

strange-steve

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Did you split your malts 50/50 for the mashes or move all the dark grains to the initial mash in an attempt to control pH of both mashes?
I did consider shifting the roasted malts around for pH purposes but in the end decided just to split the grist 50/50.

I used Bru'n Water to help with the bicarbonate addition for the first mash (my tap water has about 40 ppm alkalinity) but for the second mash I just took a stab in the dark and added 1/4 tsp of sodium bicarbonate thinking I could adjust it mid-mash if needed but it worked out OK.

Otherwise iirc, the water profile was something like 90 ppm calcium, 100 chloride and 75 sulphate.

Shame about your beer, how did it turn out anyway? This is my first time using kveik yeast but apparently Hornindal is good for 16%. We'll see o_O
 

F00b4r

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I did consider shifting the roasted malts around for pH purposes but in the end decided just to split the grist 50/50.

I used Bru'n Water to help with the bicarbonate addition for the first mash (my tap water has about 40 ppm alkalinity) but for the second mash I just took a stab in the dark and added 1/4 tsp of sodium bicarbonate thinking I could adjust it mid-mash if needed but it worked out OK.

Otherwise iirc, the water profile was something like 90 ppm calcium, 100 chloride and 75 sulphate.

Shame about your beer, how did it turn out anyway? This is my first time using kveik yeast but apparently Hornindal is good for 16%. We'll see o_O
Interesting that you still hit your mash pH then and good to know. My beer has been sealed up for about 9 months and I thought I would check on it last week, just in case the Brett C was still around (it was from the Malt Miller with a good date so I'm pretty sure it was fine going in). It was still at 1.054 and although it has some good flavours and no autolysis off flavours it is too rich at that FG. I have some Champagne yeast turning up this week to make one last ditch attempt at saving it, if that doesn't work then it is down the drain I think. I'm definitely going to try again though, so quite interested to see how your yeast choice gets on and if it affects the flavour in a good way or not. There is a slight Brett edge to it though and I might co pitch half the next batch with it again.
 

MyQul

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Back at it this morning and a rather interesting update. If you wondered if the reiterated mash is worthwhile as far as efficiency goes, have a look at the following picture. I had estimated a brewhouse efficiency of 60% which would require a pre-boil gravity of 1.075...


That's 1.096 meaning all else equal my BHE should be 76% which is crazy for such a big beer.

So this leaves me with a choice to make now:

1. Do I proceed as planned which would give me an OG of 1.168 ashock1

2. Do I reduce the boil time so that I have a larger volume but OG is closer to 1.140?

3. Do I leave out the DME and half of the sugar for an OG of 1.147?
Go for the 1.168 monster
 

Sadfield

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Interesting that you still hit your mash pH then and good to know. My beer has been sealed up for about 9 months and I thought I would check on it last week, just in case the Brett C was still around (it was from the Malt Miller with a good date so I'm pretty sure it was fine going in). It was still at 1.054 and although it has some good flavours and no autolysis off flavours it is too rich at that FG. I have some Champagne yeast turning up this week to make one last ditch attempt at saving it, if that doesn't work then it is down the drain I think. I'm definitely going to try again though, so quite interested to see how your yeast choice gets on and if it affects the flavour in a good way or not. There is a slight Brett edge to it though and I might co pitch half the next batch with it again.
The problem may not be alcohol tolerance, rather Brett C often doesn't metabolise maltose which makes up a large portion of wort.

Getting a source of glucoamylase in there could kick things off. A Saison yeast or even dry hopping might do it.
 

F00b4r

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The problem may not be alcohol tolerance, rather Brett C often doesn't metabolise maltose which makes up a large portion of wort.

Getting a source of glucoamylase in there could kick things off. A Saison yeast or even dry hopping might do it.
I did consider this, especially with regard to the Brett (I wasn't aware about C's issue with maltose and choose it mainly due to heritage reasons), but I pitched big initially with the sach, the alcoholic tolerance tied suspiciously with the level it died at (schoolboy error in switching yeasts) and although I have some 3711 I was a bit worried about it then just munching is way through almost everything and leaving a really dry thin beer. I might try throwing some dry hops in there with the Champagne yeast, what do you think?
 

big yogi

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When it's done I'm gonna do a group tasting along with this lot on the local park bench
Hopefully not all on the same night:D
 

Sadfield

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@F00b4r Won't hurt to throw some hops in, historically IPAs were dry hopped with a small addition despite being aged for a year. Ron Pattinson told me it was around 6-8oz per Barrel (1.37-2.75g/L). Presumably, using such a low rate in a aged beer, suggests this was to aid attenuation rather than for adding flavour or aroma.

I agree, alcohol tolerance was the issue with the Saccharomyces.
 

Zephyr259

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Glad it's all going to plan this far, hope the yeast are up to the job. Thanks for the detailed report.
 

-Bezza-

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This is amazing. Just a shame we'll have to wait many, many months to find out how the final beer tastes. Guess I won't be jacking in my forum membership until then. clapa
 
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