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The rise of the middle age renter.

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Chippy_Tea

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I am listening to a report saying middle age renting has doubled and they have few rights (they can be turned out at very short notice) and because it costs a lot more to rent it's difficult to put money aside for a deposit on a house, I am lucky as I now own my house so no mortgage how many here are in the position above?
 

Ciaran12s

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I'm in that position myself. I'm not quite middle aged (30) but I actually just got evicted last month. Been in the house 18 months absolutely no issues from either party, estate agent rocks up to the door and says you've got 2 months to move out, the owner is moving in.
They "chose" me as the tenant during the applications due to having 3 kids and the stability that comes with that. Ie I'm not likely to leave any time soon so the money keeps rolling in.
There's very little housing available in my area, so I've had to move a few miles which puts me out of the school area. The kids can still go to the school thankfully but it now means a 45 minute school run twice everyday as the buses don't cover the area.

Livid and mortified doesn't quite cover it. It would also appear the owner has no intention of moving in but bought the house for a child which now wants it. Then they've claimed the full deposit for damages and cleaning! I spent 3 hours cleaning the day I moved in before actually moving anything in.

So well and truly ****** off with that fiasco. To me, if someone rents a property to live in, they should have the right to remain in that property for life, regardless of whether ownership of the property changes hands or not. The "put your big boy pants on, thats part of renting" surely should apply more to the "business men and women" who have chosen to start a business in providing housing to families in the private sector. You buy a house to rent out, that house remains a rental until such time as the current tenant wishes to leave.
Obviously non payment of rent and anti social behaviour etc are not acceptable.
 

Ciaran12s

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Hi @Ciaran12s
Re-loss of deposit.
Did you have a report on the condition of the house when you accepted the tenancy?
If not, the surely you have good grounds for claiming that no deterioration has taken place.
https://www.tenancydepositscheme.com/news/blog/asktds-can-landlord-charge-cleaning/
I'm going through all the process at the moment. I think the deposit holding scheme will rule in my favour in the end up, or certainly to an extent. But thanks for the link bigcol!
 
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jjsh

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I'm 46, and until last year, rented by choice. I've now purchased a house that I intend to live in till I die.

Renting suited me as it gave me maximum employment flexibility, and by renting a tiny house / flat even when I climbed up the greasy pole, allowed me so save a substantial deposit.

However, I now have responsibility for two kids, so needed to provide stability, and can appreciate that renting in that situation can be frustrating sometimes.
 

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I am listening to a report saying middle age renting has doubled and they have few rights (they can be turned out at very short notice) and because it costs a lot more to rent it's difficult to put money aside for a deposit on a house, I am lucky as I now own my house so no mortgage how many here are in the position above?
Like you chippy I am lucky enough to now own my house and have been fortunate enough to pay the deposits on both my children's mortgages and am there as a safety net for them,but I haven't told them that
 

simon12

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I'm going through all the process at the moment. I think the deposit holding scheme will rule in my favour in the end up, or certainly to an extent. But thanks for the link bigcol!
I had similar issues last time I rented, if it helps one thing I found out they can't charge you for carpets more than 3 years old at all and if less only the portion of the 3 years remaining ie. if there 1.5 years old they can charge you half the value.
 

simon12

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The issue with tenants long term security is the agents always want 6-12 month leases (so they make more money renewing it) but I imagine many landlords would prefer longer and there is no reason not to be able to get one. If you want real long term security get a commercial lease for 5-25 years+ it should be cheaper but you will be responsible for all the property maintenance and insurance and they will want 3-6 months deposit.
 

airymary

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I am listening to a report saying middle age renting has doubled and they have few rights (they can be turned out at very short notice) and because it costs a lot more to rent it's difficult to put money aside for a deposit on a house, I am lucky as I now own my house so no mortgage how many here are in the position above?
Where does this idea come from? To evict a tenant (and I'm speaking as a landlord) at least 28 days notice must be given, in the correct format. If the tenant doesn't/can't leave, the landlord has to apply for a court order. Of course, you get a court hearing date really quickly - just a week or 2. Oh, hold on, is it actually months and months you have to wait? Oh yes, it is... If you still have a tenant after these steps, you have to apply for enforcement, and arrange for the court bailiffs to attend and evict. So a few more months go by...

I think the picture of unfortunates getting to a point where they want a settled life, but instead having to cower before an evil landlord, makes a good, sensationalist media story. Such stories, on this and most other subjects, rarely coincide with the facts. The family which rents my property have been there for 7 years - no-one turns-out tenants for no good reason.
 

Ciaran12s

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Where does this idea come from? To evict a tenant (and I'm speaking as a landlord) at least 28 days notice must be given, in the correct format. If the tenant doesn't/can't leave, the landlord has to apply for a court order. Of course, you get a court hearing date really quickly - just a week or 2. Oh, hold on, is it actually months and months you have to wait? Oh yes, it is... If you still have a tenant after these steps, you have to apply for enforcement, and arrange for the court bailiffs to attend and evict. So a few more months go by...

I think the picture of unfortunates getting to a point where they want a settled life, but instead having to cower before an evil landlord, makes a good, sensationalist media story. Such stories, on this and most other subjects, rarely coincide with the facts. The family which rents my property have been there for 7 years - no-one turns-out tenants for no good reason.
My family and I were turned out for no good reason. (My spoilt brat wants a house and I'm giving them your home isn't a good reason. Buy your brat a different house)

My point about the property being bought as business, that business then seeking a family with young kids and a good job for the stability that brings to their business, to then decide it's not a business any more, my kid wants that house for themself, should be clamped down on.

There was no warning whatsoever, the bare minimum two months obviously but none other than that. That's two months stress and turmoil for a young family. That family then has to move a considerable distance due to the lack of supply/pricing. Two months of our lives spent packing, viewing umpteen places, searching all evening, stressed out due to the poor supply.

If you want to go in to business renting out homes, once you've got a good tenant, you shouldnt be able to evict them on a whim. Is it so terrible for people priced out of the buyers market to want stability and security in their home? God knows most people are paying plenty of cash for it every month.
 

simon12

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If you want more security insist on signing a longer lease and try to renew it well before its run out, if you signed a lease that says you can be evicted with X months notice thats what you agreed to.
 

airymary

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My family and I were turned out for no good reason. (My spoilt brat wants a house and I'm giving them your home isn't a good reason. Buy your brat a different house)
Ciaran12s - I imagine a landlord's 'good reason' will rarely coincide with a tenant's. The law has recognised wanting a property for own or family use as a legitimate ground for repossession. You think your landlord should find a different house for his 'spoilt brat' (really?). Your landlord thought you should find a different home.

28 days is short notice! I got 54 and just managed to get out.
Depends on the type of tenancy or licence. Notice expiry isn't a deadline to move, it simply ends the tenancy. A tenant who stays might incur court costs, though, if the landlord has to go to court for a possession order.
 

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They'll never evict me - I've booby trapped the entire house. What good is bits of paper from the court with 240 volts coursing thru' your body or falling thru' a trapdoor straight to the bowels of hell?
 

Ciaran12s

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Ciaran12s - I imagine a landlord's 'good reason' will rarely coincide with a tenant's. The law has recognised wanting a property for own or family use as a legitimate ground for repossession. You think your landlord should find a different house for his 'spoilt brat' (really?). Your landlord thought you should find a different home.


Depends on the type of tenancy or licence. Notice expiry isn't a deadline to move, it simply ends the tenancy. A tenant who stays might incur court costs, though, if the landlord has to go to court for a possession order.
I'm not claiming they are acting out with the law. Simply expressing that I believe the laws should be changed to give people a right to remain in their home. There's too many have a go landlords putting people out of their homes when they decide they want the house or want to sell or whatever. Not saying it's illegal, just saying that I don't think it's right. The family home is absolutely central to any family, that shouldn't be pulled from beneath their feet for what I deem no good reason.

If you want to be a big boy and go into business providing homes, then you should be in the business long term, not simply filling the house for a while until you want it back. So if a tenant fails to find a new suitable property within the deadline they've got the usual rent plus a court case and court fees to contend with as well? It keeps getting better.
 

simon12

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I'm not claiming they are acting out with the law. Simply expressing that I believe the laws should be changed to give people a right to remain in their home. There's too many have a go landlords putting people out of their homes when they decide they want the house or want to sell or whatever. Not saying it's illegal, just saying that I don't think it's right. The family home is absolutely central to any family, that shouldn't be pulled from beneath their feet for what I deem no good reason.

If you want to be a big boy and go into business providing homes, then you should be in the business long term, not simply filling the house for a while until you want it back. So if a tenant fails to find a new suitable property within the deadline they've got the usual rent plus a court case and court fees to contend with as well? It keeps getting better.
What do you suggest changing in the law? Why should a landlord have to commit to it long term? There no other type of business you are forced to continue until the end of your customers life. Why would you make it illegal to rent a property for a short period before you want to do something else with it.
 

Ciaran12s

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If you want more security insist on signing a longer lease and try to renew it well before its run out, if you signed a lease that says you can be evicted with X months notice thats what you agreed to.
It's extremely difficult to find a place to begin with. Demand outweighs supply so in most cases there is an application process. The most desirable tenant in the application process is given the tenancy. The chances of finding a place suitable enough and then demanding the landlord signs your version of a tenancy agreement rather than theirs is pie in the sky.
 

Ciaran12s

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What do you suggest changing in the law? Why should a landlord have to commit to it long term? There no other type of business you are forced to continue until the end of your customers life. Why would you make it illegal to rent a property for a short period before you want to do something else with it.
Because you are providing families with homes. Simple as that. Have you ever been evicted from your home after being a good tenant and paying all rent on time?

A counter question, why should families not have the right to stability and security in their home?
 

Chippy_Tea

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I know this will not go down well but buy to rent the should never have been allowed, the government sold all the council houses off at a snip of their actual value and didn't put the money back into affordable housing and now people trying to get on the housing ladder are screwed for the reasons in the OP.
 

jjsh

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This is obviously an emotive subject, for completely understandable reasons, but reducing supply only ever benefits the supplier, for a given demand. So banning buy to let, or making buying property to let out unattractive by forcing lifetime tenancy would drastically reduce the amount of rental property available, only strengthening the landlords position. Sorry, but that's simple economics.

The real cause of housing issues, both in the rental and home owner markets are restricted supply and inflated demand.
 

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