The TV Licence.

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Chippy_Tea

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I think that the government are smart and know that the public are stupid enough to get distracted by another story. It works time and time again, like the fact that the half-a-billion-pound fraud largely got missed by the public due to Partygate
As its on tv and the news and in the papers every time you turn it on or read them its fairly obvious people are not going to forget what went on that of course will not stop the haters trying to persuade those that think differently they are wrong.
 

Chippy_Tea

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Don't forget, privatise the BBC and that will mean the issue of shares. The rich will be able to afford to buy those shares and make money on them. The rich are generally Tory supporters.
Just saying :confused.:
Has there been any discussion of privatising the BBC i thought they were going to discuss other methods of funding the BBC so we can get away from the licence fee, just saying. :confused.:


Even former BBC leaders have acknowledged the licence fee regime is due for an overhaul.
While some ministers are sympathetic to a Netflix-style subscription model, there are other options that maintain significant public funding.

 
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Chippy_Tea

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Netflix and the utility companies are limited companies with shares that you can buy on the stock market. I am not sure what your point is? 🤔
It says it may be a Netflix-style subscription model they haven't even started discussing it yet but you are already saying there are going to be shares and rich Tories are going to be making loads of money out of this, why don't we wait and see what they come up with before sticking the knife in.
 

A fool's paradise

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Let people decide if they want it or not, if the BBC are happy with their programme output then if it was a subscription service the vast majority would subscribe and anyone who wanted something different wouldn't, obvious really. Maybe they will look at their wage structure as well, plenty of money could be saved there.
The licence route is SO outdated now and harks back to when there were just 2 or 3 channels available. Totally wrong this day and age to make you pay for something you may not want.
 

DavidDetroit

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Not too familiar with BBC other than some programming was available because we're close to Canada.
If you don't have a TV in your house in the UK, do you have to pay for BBC? I saw above that it's not just TV but other services.
Is BBC via cable, over-the-air or both? We have over-the-air digital, free and the picture is very good, lots of channels, but the reception quality can decline depending on where you live.
The bottom line is our household needs an internet connection so even if that's all you have, it's expensive out of proportion. The plans here are designed to hook you in.
 

Chippy_Tea

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Let people decide if they want it or not, if the BBC are happy with their programme output then if it was a subscription service the vast majority would subscribe and anyone who wanted something different wouldn't, obvious really. Maybe they will look at their wage structure as well, plenty of money could be saved there.
The licence route is SO outdated now and harks back to when there were just 2 or 3 channels available. Totally wrong this day and age to make you pay for something you may not want.
I totally agree the fee is outdated and it will be interesting to see how this ends.

The wages some employees get are ridiculous there are also way too many people employed, take breakfast TV two on the sofa doing the main work then you have the weather person and a sport person every day, why do we need a person telling us the weather we all have phones so can visit the many weather sites or use apps and for those that don't they could put a weather map on screen. i have just checked and one site said Carlo Kirkwood (main breakfast TV weather person) earns £400,000.
 
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lancon

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At £12 a month the licence fee is roughly the same as Netflix and other streaming services so in my view its not expensive, people forget the fee doesn't just pay for the TV channels it also pays for radio, the BBC website, podcasts, iPlayer and apps.
Instead of going pay per view (or whatever they decide) they should get rid of BBC 3 & 4 and all repeats and just have BBC 1 & 2 we don't need favourite TV progs to be on from 6 pm to 10pm these days many houses have TV boxes that record and we have on demand services so there is no need to ever miss a favourite episode or show.
And as soon as BBC gone then Netflix and other streaming services will just put their prices up and/or standards/quality drop, its standard procedure
 

Chippy_Tea

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Time to sort the wage bill out -

Do we really need Linaker and shearer at £1,750,000 plus the other they always have on MOTD.


▼ Gary Lineker - £1,360,000-£1,364,999

▼ Zoe Ball - £1,130,000-£1,134,999

▼ Steve Wright - £465,000-£469,999

▼ Huw Edwards - £425,000-£429,999

▼ Fiona Bruce - £405,000-£409,999

▲ Stephen Nolan - £405,000-£409,999

➤ Lauren Laverne - £395,000-£399,999

▼ Vanessa Feltz - £390,000-£394,999

➤ Alan Shearer - £390,000-£394,999

▲ Scott Mills - £375,000-£379,999

▼ Ken Bruce - £365,000-£369,999

▼ Andrew Marr - £335,000-£339,999

▼ Emily Maitlis - £325,000-£329,999

▲ George Alagiah - £325,000-£329,999

▲ Greg James - £310,000-£314,999

▼ Jeremy Vine - £295,000-£299,999

▼ Nicky Campbell - £295,000-£299,999

Dan Walker - £295,000-£295,999

▲ Sophie Raworth - £280,000-£284,999

▲ Mishal Husain - £275,000-£279,999

▼ Jo Whiley - £275,000-£279,999

➤ Sara Cox - £275,000-£279,999

▼ Nick Robinson - £270,000-£274,999

▼ Evan Davis - £270,000-£274,999

▼ Jason Mohammad - £270,000-£274,999

▼ Laura Kuenssberg - £260,000-£264,999

▼ Martha Kearney - £250,000-£254,999

▲ Naga Munchetty - £255,000-£259,999

▲ Justin Webb - £255,000-£259,999

▲ Mark Chapman - £250,000-£254,999

▼ Sarah Montague - £245,000-£249,999

➤ Nick Grimshaw - £240,000-£244,999

▼ Emma Barnett - £240,000-£249,999

▲ Amol Rajan - £240,000-£249,999

▼ Jon Sopel - £230,000-£234,999

▲ Trevor Nelson: £230,000-£234,999

▼ Tina Daheley - £225,000-£229,999

➤ Jeremy Bowen: £220,000-£224,999

▲ Katya Adler - £220,000-£224,999

➤ Mary Berry - £215,000-£219,999

▼ Kirsty Wark - £210,000-£214,999

▼ Clive Myrie - £205,000-£209,999

➤ Fergal Keane - £205,000-£209,999

▲ Faisal Islam - £205,000-£209,999

▲ Rachel Burden - £205,000-£209,999

★ Louis Theroux - £200,000 - £204,999

£195,000-£199,999

  • Jermaine Jenas
£190,000-£194,999
  • Mark Easton
  • Simon Jack
  • Charlie Stayt
£185,000-£189,999
  • Louise Minchin
  • Sarah Smith
£175,000-£179,999
  • Jonathan Agnew
  • Reeta Chakrabarti
  • Michael Vaughan
£170,000-£174,999
  • Ben Brown
  • Victoria Derbyshire
  • Annie Mac
  • James Naughtie
£165,000-£169,999
  • Clara Amfo
  • Gabby Logan
£160,000-£164,999
  • Orla Guerin
  • Shaun Keaveny
  • Simon McCoy
£155,000-£159,999
  • Joanna Gosling
  • Steve Lamacq
  • Graham Norton
£150,000-£154,999
  • Nihal Arthanayake
  • Isa Guha
  • Mary-Anne Hobbs
  • Carolyn Quinn
  • Winifred Robinson
 

moto748

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Not too familiar with BBC other than some programming was available because we're close to Canada.
If you don't have a TV in your house in the UK, do you have to pay for BBC? I saw above that it's not just TV but other services.
Is BBC via cable, over-the-air or both? We have over-the-air digital, free and the picture is very good, lots of channels, but the reception quality can decline depending on where you live.
The bottom line is our household needs an internet connection so even if that's all you have, it's expensive out of proportion. The plans here are designed to hook you in.
You only pay the licence fee if you have a TV set. Cable and over-the-air, a you put it. From whenever TVs became widespread (late 50s?), *everyone* had an aerial on their roof to pick up a TV signal. Some still do, but in the UK, as I'm sure, in the US, many people get their TV via the internet these days.

Also, David, when you say. ;free'.... 'Free' TV will have ads. So that's a big downside right there. Interestingly, the laws about permitted frequency of ads are different here, so when we watch network US shows, often, not only are there the scheduled ad breaks, but you can see where there were additional ad breaks in the US that we didn't stop for in the UK! Which makes me think that it would be intolerable to watch the most popular shows with ads literally every five minutes.
 

Dorst

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Not too familiar with BBC other than some programming was available because we're close to Canada.
If you don't have a TV in your house in the UK, do you have to pay for BBC? I saw above that it's not just TV but other services.
Is BBC via cable, over-the-air or both? We have over-the-air digital, free and the picture is very good, lots of channels, but the reception quality can decline depending on where you live.
The bottom line is our household needs an internet connection so even if that's all you have, it's expensive out of proportion. The plans here are designed to hook you in.
You can use a television to watch Netflix or play video games so no. (last time I checked) The definition is that you need to pay if you watch or record live television. Even if that television is broadcasted from outside of the UK (Netherlands) and you watch it on your mobile phone through 4G you need to pay a TV license because you watched it in your home.

For anyone that comes from outside of the UK the letters that they send you are absolutely bonkers:

1642516065135.png


They threathen to come and do what? See if you have a television? Will they check my browsing history? Will they come and see which apps are installed on my phone and tablet?

In the Netherlands our public broadcasting stations are paid from taxes which people pay on their income and their wealth. You don't need a TV licensing gestappo which also saves money.
 

Flat Foot

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I'll admit to having a bit of a soft spot for the BBC. All this including the 39 local stations


It doesn't necessarily mean I think it's perfect and that bits can't be improved, but I really do think people will miss it if it's gone.

It's also possibly the only institution that can be accused of being both biased towards the left and the right simultaneously.

Salaries are always an easy attack point but I guess it depends both if they're market rate and if we decide that's what we want the BBC to keep up with. I can't comprehend how much Lineker is paid for what he does, maybe I don't understand it all, but I'd bet he'd be paid similar at ITV or Sky. That isn't me necessarily saying it's right but maybe the happy alternative is always having younger talent in that sort of role and accepting it'll always be a bit of a revolving door as they're poached by rival commercial broadcasters.
 

DavidDetroit

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For anyone that comes from outside of the UK the letters that they send you are absolutely bonkers:
Thanks.
That note is a bit intimidating.
The way to get BBC here (I just checked now) is just to add the channel. Something called "BBC Home" shows up free but "BBC America" has to be paid for.
 

DavidDetroit

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You only pay the licence fee if you have a TV set. Cable and over-the-air, a you put it. From whenever TVs became widespread (late 50s?), *everyone* had an aerial on their roof to pick up a TV signal. Some still do, but in the UK, as I'm sure, in the US, many people get their TV via the internet these days.

Also, David, when you say. ;free'.... 'Free' TV will have ads. So that's a big downside right there. Interestingly, the laws about permitted frequency of ads are different here, so when we watch network US shows, often, not only are there the scheduled ad breaks, but you can see where there were additional ad breaks in the US that we didn't stop for in the UK! Which makes me think that it would be intolerable to watch the most popular shows with ads literally every five minutes.
Yeah, we grew up with commercials. Shows from the 60's had 4 minutes per half hour and currently about 9 minutes. Hour programs are twelve minutes of commercials. How do I know? When I watch Netflix, a show will be 48 minutes long, no commercials, but aired on network TV in an hour slot.
I don't do commercials and don't watch regular TV. Netflix gets one used to no commercials.
 

xozzx

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I dont pay for a tv license and dont watch any of the content which requires one, I only use Netflix and Amazon (I have checked online exactly what requires a tv license). The threatening letters are ridiculous, I have no idea how they are allowed to do this. I have had an active investigation open on my address for a few years now and get threatening letters every few weeks which just go on the fire. If any of their thugs turn up they'll just get the door closed in their face, if I catch them looking in my windows Ill call the police about a suspected pedophile trying to see my son in the bath.
 

ScotchMist

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Time to sort the wage bill out -

Do we really need Linaker and shearer at £1,750,000 plus the other they always have on MOTD.


▼ Gary Lineker - £1,360,000-£1,364,999

▼ Zoe Ball - £1,130,000-£1,134,999

▼ Steve Wright - £465,000-£469,999

▼ Huw Edwards - £425,000-£429,999

▼ Fiona Bruce - £405,000-£409,999

▲ Stephen Nolan - £405,000-£409,999

➤ Lauren Laverne - £395,000-£399,999

▼ Vanessa Feltz - £390,000-£394,999

➤ Alan Shearer - £390,000-£394,999

▲ Scott Mills - £375,000-£379,999

▼ Ken Bruce - £365,000-£369,999

▼ Andrew Marr - £335,000-£339,999

▼ Emily Maitlis - £325,000-£329,999

▲ George Alagiah - £325,000-£329,999

▲ Greg James - £310,000-£314,999

▼ Jeremy Vine - £295,000-£299,999

▼ Nicky Campbell - £295,000-£299,999

Dan Walker - £295,000-£295,999

▲ Sophie Raworth - £280,000-£284,999

▲ Mishal Husain - £275,000-£279,999

▼ Jo Whiley - £275,000-£279,999

➤ Sara Cox - £275,000-£279,999

▼ Nick Robinson - £270,000-£274,999

▼ Evan Davis - £270,000-£274,999

▼ Jason Mohammad - £270,000-£274,999

▼ Laura Kuenssberg - £260,000-£264,999

▼ Martha Kearney - £250,000-£254,999

▲ Naga Munchetty - £255,000-£259,999

▲ Justin Webb - £255,000-£259,999

▲ Mark Chapman - £250,000-£254,999

▼ Sarah Montague - £245,000-£249,999

➤ Nick Grimshaw - £240,000-£244,999

▼ Emma Barnett - £240,000-£249,999

▲ Amol Rajan - £240,000-£249,999

▼ Jon Sopel - £230,000-£234,999

▲ Trevor Nelson: £230,000-£234,999

▼ Tina Daheley - £225,000-£229,999

➤ Jeremy Bowen: £220,000-£224,999

▲ Katya Adler - £220,000-£224,999

➤ Mary Berry - £215,000-£219,999

▼ Kirsty Wark - £210,000-£214,999

▼ Clive Myrie - £205,000-£209,999

➤ Fergal Keane - £205,000-£209,999

▲ Faisal Islam - £205,000-£209,999

▲ Rachel Burden - £205,000-£209,999

★ Louis Theroux - £200,000 - £204,999

£195,000-£199,999

  • Jermaine Jenas
£190,000-£194,999
  • Mark Easton
  • Simon Jack
  • Charlie Stayt
£185,000-£189,999
  • Louise Minchin
  • Sarah Smith
£175,000-£179,999
  • Jonathan Agnew
  • Reeta Chakrabarti
  • Michael Vaughan
£170,000-£174,999
  • Ben Brown
  • Victoria Derbyshire
  • Annie Mac
  • James Naughtie
£165,000-£169,999
  • Clara Amfo
  • Gabby Logan
£160,000-£164,999
  • Orla Guerin
  • Shaun Keaveny
  • Simon McCoy
£155,000-£159,999
  • Joanna Gosling
  • Steve Lamacq
  • Graham Norton
£150,000-£154,999
  • Nihal Arthanayake
  • Isa Guha
  • Mary-Anne Hobbs
  • Carolyn Quinn
  • Winifred Robinson
This gets bandied about a lot, but for all I know it's market rates. What are the equivalents for Skye/other broadcasters?
 

the baron

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It may be market rates but the BBC is not in the commercial market and is funded by a licence not by commercial advertising so IMO he is well overpaid and even on commercial stations the man is still overpaid
 

trummy

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Over paid without a doubt! A streamlining of 'pundits' and the obligatory female question asker (most have no idea about the relevant sport in question) would save a tidy sum over a year, but at 43p a day its not a bad deal.
 

jof

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I think the BBC have lost their way a bit.
My feeling is that although they do still produce good stuff, it's not as good as it used to be. E.g. I am more likely to find new comedy on Dave where I used to get it on bbc2 (and then bbc4 for a short while before it was taken off air).

Also too many repeats but I guess it's only the old folk that watch TV like that these days so it doesn't matter if they show dad's army at peak time every night.

Younger generation just doesn't consume TV in the same way, so they don't care & won't pay for license, as they watch ticktock, utube & blag a Netflix login from their mates (or just get 1 month and binge watch)

Presenter wages are headline grabbers, but for each one, how many production staff & managers are used & costs of sets & studios?
But yes, does the bbc need to pay these big celebrities to hang on to them so long when there must be plenty of potential new talent that needs nurturing?
 

Chippy_Tea

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This gets bandied about a lot, but for all I know it's market rates. What are the equivalents for Skye/other broadcasters?
The difference is Sky can afford to pay it because the price they charge customers is so high if the BBC want to lower the price wages are going to have to be looked at.

I watch MOTD and i can honestly say if Linaker and Shearer left and were replaced by some x football player on half the money it would not bother me and it would not harm the show at all i don't watch MOTD to listen to some retired players views on the games they show and TBH its a bit pointless as we have all just watched the same clips and can make our own minds up on who played the best, again like breakfast TV why do they need 3 people to show a few clips of the games, cut the chat and show more of the games.
 
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