Tynt Meadow Yeast

Discussion in 'Grain, Hops, Yeast & Water' started by jceg316, Feb 18, 2019.

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  1. Feb 18, 2019 #1

    jceg316

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    Has anyone cultured up Tynt Meadow yeast and used it in a brew? I've been wanting to try this for a while now and have 3 bottles I'm gonna have on Saturday. Is the yeast English or Belgian style?
     
  2. Feb 18, 2019 #2

    jjsh

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    I *think* I read the yeast is one of the things the Belgian monks brought over to help with their venture, so you would like to think it was Belgian.
     
  3. Feb 18, 2019 #3

    jceg316

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    According to their website:
    If anyone has cultured this up and use it in a brew I'd be interested to hear more about it.
     
  4. Feb 18, 2019 #4

    IainM

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    The yeast character tastes pretty Belgian to me. Perhaps they ramp up the temps.
     
  5. Feb 19, 2019 #5

    jceg316

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    Have you used the yeast in a brew or is this just from drinking a bottle of the stuff?
     
  6. Feb 19, 2019 #6

    IainM

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    Just from drinking the beer.
     
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  7. Mar 3, 2019 #7

    jceg316

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    I tried this beer and it was excellent. To me was an interesting cross between English and Belgian beer, but I was very drunk by the time I got round to it. I saved the yeast from 3 bottles and today I'm brewing a bitter which I'm gonna pitch the yeast into. Will keep you all updated with how it goes
     
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  8. Mar 4, 2019 #8

    Clint

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    I've just got a bottle...
     
  9. Mar 5, 2019 #9

    jceg316

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    Enjoy! Let me know what you think.
     
  10. Mar 17, 2019 at 10:23 AM #10

    jceg316

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    The yeast has got stuck at 1.020. last week I turned up the heat from 19-21°c but made no difference, yesterday I roused the yeast and increased to 23°c. I'm wondering if this yeast is supposedto finish high.
     
  11. Mar 21, 2019 at 10:25 AM #11

    Zephyr259

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    What did it start at?
     
  12. Mar 21, 2019 at 10:29 AM #12

    jceg316

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    It started at 1.043. I turned the heat up to 23C and it's started fermenting again. There is airlock activity and I took a sample last night where it was at ~1.013.
     
  13. Mar 21, 2019 at 10:33 AM #13

    Zephyr259

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    That's good to hear, 53% attenuation wasn't very reassuring, 70% is getting there.
     
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  14. Mar 21, 2019 at 11:38 AM #14

    Sadfield

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    The website says the yeast is an English strain. Given that they're new and just starting up, I wonder if they use a dry strain as a start point, for consistency. Windsor? Would fit with attenuation being experienced. Or, they could just get it from a local brewery. I notice they are using conical FVs, so probably crop yeast from the bottom as opposed to top cropping. This might have an impact on choice of yeast.
     
    Last edited: Mar 21, 2019 at 11:54 AM
  15. Mar 21, 2019 at 3:09 PM #15

    jceg316

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    The Belgian Trappist breweries take their yeast very seriously. After reading Brew Like a Monk it seems it's the most important ingredient they spend the most time on. I don't know how similar this brewery would be? I've not used Windsor before, it would be interesting if a Trappist brewery is using it.

    The beer itself definitely had a 'Belgian flavour' to it, but I wouldn't be surprised if that came from use of something like special B as opposed to yeast. I was pretty drunk at the time when I came round to trying it so I couldn't properly analyse it.
     
  16. Mar 21, 2019 at 3:49 PM #16

    Sadfield

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    I was approaching this issue from the opposite direction, and had a brief conversation with brewers on twitter about using a Belgian yeast in a Best Bitter, based on something I read. Apparently, some British strains are Phenolic Off-Flavours Positive (POF+), and as an aside, the aeration of Yorkshire squares was a way of possibly reducing phenolic off flavours. So, I guess by selecting the right British Strain and having a process that promotes, rather than inhibits phenols could work to replicate a Belgian beer. I was pointed to Brewlabs yeasts, many of which state they can produce phenolic off flavours.

    There's definitely more to Belgian beers than the yeast though, certainly Special B and the sugars add something unique.
     
    Last edited: Mar 21, 2019 at 4:08 PM

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