Under pitched yeast. Do I need to correct?

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OliH

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Hello. If one of you knowledgeable lot could advise.

I made a brew yesterday 23l with an OG of 1.052.

I didn’t really think and just used one packet of CML Clipper yeast pitched directly to the wort at about 25C.
This was then put in the fridge and cooled to 18c.
Fermentation had started by this morning.
I have now read the specs of the yeast and it says 1 x 10g packet is good for a maximum of 20l.
So my question is do I need to add more yeast or do you think I’ll get away with it!?
Cheers in advance!
 
Yes ...agree with MashBag, CML Clipper works fine for me at similar Original gravity's and volumes.....It is a cracking yeast. !
 
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Advice please.
I have a porter (20l ,OG 1.060) plenty of oxygen, nutrition etc and bunged in Wyeast London Ale 1028 smack pack at 20 degrees C, shut the fermzilla, dropped some co2 on it (8psi), and left it in the dark with temp control at 20 degrees. 2½ days later it only just showed signs of life. I was anxious but not too worried, except I now see the yeast was 1 month from ed if life so I reckon it's well underpitched. Rats! I thought and words like that. Ordered up another which I will drop in as soon as it arrives. School boy error and I'm sill finding my way with AG and all that fun. Do you reckon some funky stuff might occur or I will get away with it?
 
It will be ok as you are not fermenting at lower temps so it will do its job
Edit
Sorry I was answering the first post and not #5
Re post#5 I would re-pitch with fresh yeast
 
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Phew, after all the effort of getting that far and the anticipation of the nibs, vanilla and hazelnut essence awaiting it once done. Plus it's for a friend. Thanks for the reassurance.
 
I disagree (sorry) after 2.5 days I would repitch pronto.

I expect life, from sprinkled in 12hours. So my only caveat is this normal for a smackpack?
 
I've used London Ale III before and had action after about 24hrs so wasn't too surprised but was definitely expecting something before 2½ days. Will re pitch and pray to the beer gods anyway
 
As insurance, I always do a vitality starter at the very least with liquid yeast. Saves for any nasty surprises. I've had apparently very fresh yeast before that was very sluggish and I can only imagine it was stored poorly/suffered in transport. Dried is far more robust, so I don't bother with starters for dry.
 
You'll be fine this time, but personally I think that pitching 2 packs of dried yeast is a good idea once you're at or near the limit of the single pack's capacity.

It gives you a bit of spare capacity in case one pack hasn't had a great life, and in general I think it gives you a better beer in the end. I've had many beers at home brew meets where there's a fermentation issue that would have likely been resolved with a second packet of yeast.
 
You'll be fine this time, but personally I think that pitching 2 packs of dried yeast is a good idea once you're at or near the limit of the single pack's capacity.

It gives you a bit of spare capacity in case one pack hasn't had a great life, and in general I think it gives you a better beer in the end. I've had many beers at home brew meets where there's a fermentation issue that would have likely been resolved with a second packet of yeast.
Generally been using liquid stuff and it's been fine. Going to play with making a starter to improve pitching rates I think. Looks like a good skill to gain. I have another pack of yeast so should should be good ta.
 
I always use yeast nutrient with dry yeast and re-pitched yeast
I think the question you have to answer is - what problem am I trying to solve?

Malting barley is around 9-10% protein, so 1.5%+ nitrogen, you don't generally need nitrogen for the yeast to be happy.

Maybe a teaspoon of dead yeast in the boil, and if you're being really picky a tiny amount of vitamins (like 1g per 10 litres) and even less zinc (like 1ppm, it doesn't take much to cause fusels and other off flavours), but in general wort is a pretty good environment for yeast compared to wine- or mead-making.
 
Generally been using liquid stuff and it's been fine. Going to play with making a starter to improve pitching rates I think. Looks like a good skill to gain. I have another pack of yeast so should should be good ta.

Sorry, my reply was actually to the first post, I didn't realise you'd asked a question.

For future reference, my experience it's almost always worth doing some kind of starter with liquid yeast. If it's not too old then you can even do it on the brew day:

Get a litre of your wort - this can either be from 5 minutes into the boil, or take some mid/late mash runnings and boil them on your stove for 5 minutes. Cool it rapidly, then put into a sterile container with at least 50% head space (more is better!). Shake it until it's all foam, then add your yeast. I usually find that I see signs of life within a few hours, at which point you can pitch the starter (stronger worts might require some additional aeration).

If it's older and you're scared of going into the brew day not knowing the state of your yeast then it's worth doing a starter a week or so before. As this uses DME I prefer to let it ferment out, then stick it in the fridge to flocculate out the yeast so I can pour off the liquid rather than let it taint my main wort.
 
I pitched a second yeast , the 1st had started working but wanted to minimise too many funky products into a porter, it's happily frothing away now. Sealed in pressure fermenter, O2 purged and it's set at about 8psi, all appears tickety boo, thanks for the input from all, as always, to our rescue.
 

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