Using 3/16 line for gas

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Simonh82

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I'm planning a new kegerator at the moment and wanted to ask about gas lines.

At the moment I have a 2 keg kegerator in an under counter fridge. I can fit two of the newer tall kegs side by side and fit a 3.15KG CO2 bottle behind them on the compressor shelf. I'm using standard 3/8" gas line split between the two kegs.

In my new kegerator, which will be in a tall larder fridge, I want to fit four kegs in, which means the gas bottle will be outside.

I know I should be able to run a gas line in through the drain hole but one of the kegs will be for fizzy water (a strong selling point for my wife) and this will be at 20-25psi where as the beer will be at 12psi. I plan on having a secondary regulator to manage the different pressures.

With this setup, could I use a short length of 3/16" line to get two gas lines through the drain hole? I know that it would obviously take longer to bring the kegs back up to pressure after pouring a pint but I don't often serve many pints back to back so I don't see that as an issue. Is there a problem with using 3/16 gas line to get through the drain hole?
 

Alside101

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I'm planning a new kegerator at the moment and wanted to ask about gas lines.

At the moment I have a 2 keg kegerator in an under counter fridge. I can fit two of the newer tall kegs side by side and fit a 3.15KG CO2 bottle behind them on the compressor shelf. I'm using standard 3/8" gas line split between the two kegs.

In my new kegerator, which will be in a tall larder fridge, I want to fit four kegs in, which means the gas bottle will be outside.

I know I should be able to run a gas line in through the drain hole but one of the kegs will be for fizzy water (a strong selling point for my wife) and this will be at 20-25psi where as the beer will be at 12psi. I plan on having a secondary regulator to manage the different pressures.

With this setup, could I use a short length of 3/16" line to get two gas lines through the drain hole? I know that it would obviously take longer to bring the kegs back up to pressure after pouring a pint but I don't often serve many pints back to back so I don't see that as an issue. Is there a problem with using 3/16 gas line to get through the drain hole?
I used 3/16 and it caused a leak having reduces and so on it was so slight even soapy water couldn't detect it. I only noticed when i turned gas off and it lost pressure
 

foxbat

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I use 3/16 for gas. It makes no difference to pouring and there are no leaks at my JG fittings.
 

peebee

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3/8" is pretty well universal in Pubs. It was picked on probably because it causes no throughput issues. Now compare your household to a busy Pub. Can you imagine throughput issues at home using the 3/16 tube?

Of course not. Even if there was the gas pressure would soon catch up (within seconds). Homebrewers only use 3/8 'cos a few odds and ends come with 3/8 fittings by default. Never seems like a good reason to struggle with yards of inflexible 3/8 myself. Use 3/16 if you want to.

I've used 4mm ID polyurethane for eons, slightly bigger than 3/16 MDPE but even more flexible. The fittings are cheaper too (from pneumatics retailers, though aquarium users use this stuff too).
 

MrRock

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I use 3/16 as it was easier to route through the drain hole rather than drilling holes in the fridge
 

F00b4r

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You can also use reinforced PVC food grade tubing, it is really flexible and it’s burst pressure is really high. I know of at one person using 3/16 beer line that has had it go pop but there are also quite a few that use it with no issues. I think the important thing if using JG fittings is to try and ensure there is no shear stress on them.
 

Markk

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Couldn’t you just get a 3/8” drill bit and make the hole a bit digger?
 

Simonh82

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Couldn’t you just get a 3/8” drill bit and make the hole a bit digger?
It will be a new fridge so I don't really want to void the warranty. I will also need two tubes as the regulators will be on the outside and will be serving kegs with varying pressures.
 

peebee

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If you don't want to use 3/16 line, you could have a single 3/8 line at a higher pressure (4-5 BAR; a "bus" line) split in the fridge to supply two "secondary" regulators. Getting more expensive though?
 

Simonh82

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If you don't want to use 3/16 line, you could have a single 3/8 line at a higher pressure (4-5 BAR; a "bus" line) split in the fridge to supply two "secondary" regulators. Getting more expensive though?
I'm happy to use 3/16" line if it's OK to do so. It seems like it probably is, so that's fine.
 
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