Village pub asked to change name by Vogue magazine

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Chippy_Tea

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The publisher has since said after "further research" it "did not need to send such a letter on this occasion".

Pub landlord Mark Graham said he found the letter "hilariously funny".


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A village pub in Cornwall has had a letter from one of the world's largest fashion magazines asking it to change its name.
The Star Inn at Vogue, thought to be at least 150 years old, is in the small village of Vogue, near Redruth.
Vogue magazine publisher Condé Nast told the pub its name might "cause problems".
The publisher has since said after "further research" it "did not need to send such a letter on this occasion".

'Heavy-handed'
Pub landlord Mark Graham said he found the letter "hilariously funny".
He said: "I did think they were being a little heavy-handed, so I thought I'd send them a letter back - being heavy-handed too."
The company's letter, seen by the BBC, said "We are concerned that the name you are using is going to cause problems because, as far as the general public is concerned, a connection between your business and ours is likely to be inferred.
"Please would you kindly let us know what field of business your company is trading/intending to trade, and whether you will change your company's name in order to avoid problems arising."

Condé Nast wrote to Mr Graham after the pub registered as a private limited company on Companies House.
Mark Graham, who has been landlord with his wife Rachel for 17 years, wrote back, saying: "Whilst I found your letter interesting on the one hand, I also found it hilariously funny on the other."
Mr Graham told the BBC: "At first glance I thought it was one of the locals having a laugh, but apparently it is real.
"I explained to them that the village has been here for 200 years, the pub slightly less than that. We chose the name of the pub to be the name of the village."
He said he was had considered countering their claim over the use of the word because "we were there first".

Madonna had a hit song called Vogue, released in 1990, and Mr Graham told Condé Nast she had not asked the village for permission either.
The letter has also prompted him to consider further options, including setting up "our own parish magazine, called Vogue Magazine".
The letter from the publishers was sent in March and requested a reply within seven days, or it would take "appropriate remedial steps".
Mr Graham said he sent his reply within this time period and had since had a response.

'Regular monitoring'
Condé Nast said it was "grateful" for his reply, and to learn more about his business "in this beautiful part of our country".
It added its team "regularly monitor" the use of the name Vogue and was alerted through Companies House.
The letter said: "You are quite correct to note that further research by our team would have identified that we did not need to send such a letter on this occasion."
The company said it wished everyone in Vogue "best wishes for a happy summer".


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……. It was like a movie where everything stops when a stranger comes in. ……..

Ditto when Dad and I walked into a pub in Wales! There was the deadly silence, followed by all the customers restarting their conversations in Welsh!

It was a really hot day and we were thirsty, so Dad walked up to the bar and asked for a pint of bitter and a lemonade for me (I was about 10 at the time).

The man serving behind the bar must have seen Dad’s “mining tattoos” (the blue/black scars that accumulate on coal-miners hands and arms) ‘cos as he pulled the pint he asked “Miner are you?” and Dad nodded.

Within seconds, everyone turned to greet us, the conversations switched to English and the tension dissipated. Weird!
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Within seconds, everyone turned to greet us, the conversations switched to English and the tension dissipated. Weird!
Good story.
With me, I just figured they could smell an American (or stranger) and I should just move along.
I've heard on more than one occasion that we in the US haven't presented ourselves to our neighbors as well as we could have. Not knowing what diplomatic damage my countrymen might have inflicted, I was quick to be about my business and go.
If I had had my way, I would have liked to sit down, chat and get some back and forth on a few subjects.
 

Brew_DD2

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Good story.
With me, I just figured they could smell an American (or stranger) and I should just move along.
I've heard on more than one occasion that we in the US haven't presented ourselves to our neighbors as well as we could have. Not knowing what diplomatic damage my countrymen might have inflicted, I was quick to be about my business and go.
If I had had my way, I would have liked to sit down, chat and get some back and forth on a few subjects.

That's actually really sad. I always think the best policy is to take people as you find them. I would hate the thought of being tarred by association to the worst that my country has to offer.
 
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Good story.
With me, I just figured they could smell an American (or stranger) and I should just move along.
I've heard on more than one occasion that we in the US haven't presented ourselves to our neighbors as well as we could have. Not knowing what diplomatic damage my countrymen might have inflicted, I was quick to be about my business and go.
If I had had my way, I would have liked to sit down, chat and get some back and forth on a few subjects.

I've heard more than a few Americans tell people they are Canadian. In fact I'm sure that that was unofficial advice to American travellers in the early noughties.

Not sure if I've ever felt overtly unwelcome, even in an Aberdeen pub for the England vs Argentina game in 2002 surrounded by Scots wearing Maradonna tops! 🤣
 

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Ditto when Dad and I walked into a pub in Wales! There was the deadly silence, followed by all the customers restarting their conversations in Welsh!

It was a really hot day and we were thirsty, so Dad walked up to the bar and asked for a pint of bitter and a lemonade for me (I was about 10 at the time).

The man serving behind the bar must have seen Dad’s “mining tattoos” (the blue/black scars that accumulate on coal-miners hands and arms) ‘cos as he pulled the pint he asked “Miner are you?” and Dad nodded.

Within seconds, everyone turned to greet us, the conversations switched to English and the tension dissipated. Weird!
:hat:
Speaking as a Welshman, I’ve got to say that that is an oft repeated cliche. For starters, you wouldn’t have known what they were speaking before you went in the pub. If Welsh is their first language then that’s what they would have been speaking. You will also find that even a conversation between Welsh speakers will also contain English words, particularly numbers because numbers in Welsh can be a pain in the @rse and swear words. Stopping a conversation when strangers come in to a local pub is common wherever you are. I’ve done it myself although I try not to because it can come across as rude.
 

An Ankoù

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That's actually really sad. I always think the best policy is to take people as you find them. I would hate the thought of being tarred by association to the worst that my country has to offer.
Count your blessings, Scotsman. It not half as bad as mine!
But Switzerland? Can't see the Swiss getting enthusiastic about anything except watching paint dry.
 

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Count your blessings, Scotsman. It not half as bad as mine!
But Switzerland? Can't see the Swiss getting enthusiastic about anything except watching paint dry.

It's the Rangers/Celtic contingent that gives Scotland a bad name generally. You're right though, Scots are generally received. I know you love in France, but where are you from?
 
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I went into a pub in Switzerland and I have to say I didn't get the warm fuzzies from the patrons there.
Hope you checked your change. Many years ago on a motorcycling trip to Italy we spent a few days in Switzerland - every single time we spent money, or changed travellers cheques the b******s short changed us.
 

An Ankoù

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It's the Rangers/Celtic contingent that gives Scotland a bad name generally. You're right though, Scots are generally received. I know you love in France, but where are you from?
I'm a Yorkshireman by birth and persuasion and the English are well received here, too. It's just that I can't help hanging my head in shame when I think about the Muppet-Show that represents us to the world. Fortunately, most of the French just don't get it and care even less. Mais quand même!
 
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…… For starters, you wouldn’t have known what they were speaking before you went in the pub. ………..

Stopping a conversation when strangers come in to a local pub is common wherever you are. ……...
Er …. walking down a street on a hot summer day, past a pub with the windows open, you can hear what’s going on inside the pub; and even a 10 year old Derbyshire Tup can recognise English when he hears it being spoken.

Your correct in indicating that I didn’t know what they switched to after we walked in. It could have been Swahili for all I know, but all the people we talked to in the hour or so that we stayed seemed to be Welsh.

Finally, I cannot recall another occasion when a local fell silent when strangers walked in. Maybe, as a Welshman, you are more familiar with the practice.
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That's actually really sad. I always think the best policy is to take people as you find them. I would hate the thought of being tarred by association to the worst that my country has to offer.
It was isolated, I'm sure, and didn't change my opinion. If some folks want to be let be, that's cool.
I have gotten a little leery about one spot/few spots? in the UK from some of the articles @Chippy_Tea has posted about the youth who've run amuck. This is ironic however since I have lived in the most danger zip code in the US (by statistics) safely and without fear.

If you want the experience to live dangerously here for an afternoon, go to a professional American football game in Buffalo, NY and wear the opposing team's hat or jersey.
 

Chippy_Tea

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If you want the experience to live dangerously here for an afternoon, go to a professional American football game in Buffalo, NY and wear the opposing team's hat or jersey.

Football hooliganism back in the day thankfully its a lot better now and you rarely see it mentioned on the news.

 
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