What do you do with trub?

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As I poured down the kitchen sink plughole a couple of pints or so of diluted yeasty hoppy trub from the bottom of my FV I wondered if I could have made better use of it.
I compost spent grain and hops from any hop bags but trub goes down the sink.
Could I compost it, or chuck it onto the garden as a soil improver I thought.
So any original uses out there?
For example any home made 'Marmite' from autolysed trub?? :-o
 
You can use it achieve enlightenment by discovering all of the flaws in your character and personality, and where you are lacking in life skills! Simply throw the trub across your kitchen floor and your wife should swiftly dispense her vast wisdom upon you. Worked for me anyway :lol:
 
I've read that if you have a dog then you shouldn't compost your hops. It can kill them if they eat it.
 
As I poured down the kitchen sink plughole a couple of pints or so of diluted yeasty hoppy trub from the bottom of my FV I wondered if I could have made better use of it.
I compost spent grain and hops from any hop bags but trub goes down the sink.
Could I compost it, or chuck it onto the garden as a soil improver I thought.
So any original uses out there?
For example any home made 'Marmite' from autolysed trub?? :-o
throw mine in the composter
 
I've read that if you have a dog then you shouldn't compost your hops. It can kill them if they eat it.
Interesting comment that.
We know someone who has labradors and they just love cow s**t and when they do manage to have a sly meal when out on a walk they don't seem to be affected at all :sick:
 
I think I read it can make compost rot at a huge speed. At the brewery I just sold that you visited Terry we just put it in the sink and get charged loads for doing it.
 
I think I read it can make compost rot at a huge speed. At the brewery I just sold that you visited Terry we just put it in the sink and get charged loads for doing it.
well all I can tell you is the worms are thriving in my composter,maybe a little kalide but thriving all the same:thumb:
 
I read on here somewhere that someone uses the yeast trub in bread making.

Not sure how that would go if you have dry hopped though.. might be interesting lunch rolls!!
 
I read on here somewhere that someone uses the yeast trub in bread making.

Not sure how that would go if you have dry hopped though.. might be interesting lunch rolls!!

That'll be me! :thumb:

I usually dry-hop in a secondary FV so I don't have a hop problem because the trub is normally "hop-free". (However, I don't see a problem just washing the trub through a sheet of muslin in a sieve.)

I wash the trub to get the live yeast and then split it into three or four containers that I keep in the fridge for bread when I don't have any trub handy!

Here's a video on how to wash yeast ...

[ame]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Lpuc9m7ZWQY[/ame]

Because I only want the yeast for bread making I don't bother with the boiled/cooled water and so far (lucky?) I haven't had one go off on me.

I usually bake three loaves at once so I let the yeast warm up for a few hours, make up the volume to 900ml add three heaped teaspoons of sugar and stick it on the stir-plate until it starts to bubble. At which time I know that the yeast is active and can be used.

The bread recipe is dead simple:

500g Strong Flour
1tsp salt
20g of Olive oil
300ml of the yeast mixture

Mix the ingredients together and knead until its a firm dough.

Rest in a bowl for about an hour somewhere warm until doubled in size.

Knead again, put into a greased loaf tin and again put it somewhere warm.

Allow it to rise until again double the original size.

Bake in pre-heated oven at 200 degrees C until crust is brown.

Turn out and cool on a wire tray.

In a couple of days I will have the trub off a batch of cider that was started on 12th November. It will be the first time I've used trub from a batch of cider so I rather hope that it will transfer some cider flavour to the bread. :thumb: :thumb:

PS

Just like when making a yeast starter for brewing, it helps the process if you remove the magnetic stirrer before pouring the yeast into the flour! :doh: :doh:
 
That'll be me! :thumb:

I usually dry-hop in a secondary FV so I don't have a hop problem because the trub is normally "hop-free". (However, I don't see a problem just washing the trub through a sheet of muslin in a sieve.)

I wash the trub to get the live yeast and then split it into three or four containers that I keep in the fridge for bread when I don't have any trub handy!

Here's a video on how to wash yeast ...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Lpuc9m7ZWQY

Because I only want the yeast for bread making I don't bother with the boiled/cooled water and so far (lucky?) I haven't had one go off on me.

I usually bake three loaves at once so I let the yeast warm up for a few hours, make up the volume to 900ml add three heaped teaspoons of sugar and stick it on the stir-plate until it starts to bubble. At which time I know that the yeast is active and can be used.

The bread recipe is dead simple:

500g Strong Flour
1tsp salt
20g of Olive oil
300ml of the yeast mixture

Mix the ingredients together and knead until its a firm dough.

Rest in a bowl for about an hour somewhere warm until doubled in size.

Knead again, put into a greased loaf tin and again put it somewhere warm.

Allow it to rise until again double the original size.

Bake in pre-heated oven at 200 degrees C until crust is brown.

Turn out and cool on a wire tray.

In a couple of days I will have the trub off a batch of cider that was started on 12th November. It will be the first time I've used trub from a batch of cider so I rather hope that it will transfer some cider flavour to the bread. :thumb: :thumb:

PS

Just like when making a yeast starter for brewing, it helps the process if you remove the magnetic stirrer before pouring the yeast into the flour! :doh: :doh:


Going to have to give this a go, we bake all our own bread and rolls. Can't been warm rolls straight from the oven with loads of butter!!:thumb:
 
Everything that I enjoy is either illegal, immoral or fattening ... :thumb:

... and a few are two or more of the above! :whistle:

Using recovered yeast from the trub isn't like using a spoonful of Allisons Dried Yeast 'cos you can't accurately measure the amount of yeast.

I left my first batch on the kitchen work-top while I nipped down to the shops and discovered that it was over-flowing the proving bowl and spreading over the worktop when I returned about 90 minutes later! :doh:

I now watch it like a hawk!

Enjoy! :thumb:
 
Make your own Marmite is one option (I think I've seen a thread on here about that).

Ours used to go as pig feed, once we'd killed the yeast. If you don't kill the yeast first, the pigs blow up!
 
Make your own Marmite is one option (I think I've seen a thread on here about that).

Ours used to go as pig feed, once we'd killed the yeast. If you don't kill the yeast first, the pigs blow up!

I'm not sure which image is worse ...

... making and eating my own Marmite (I would give it a go if you can find it though) ... :thumb:

... or pigs that blow up! :lol: :lol:

PS

FOUND IT ...

http://www.msmarmitelover.com/2011/04/how-to-make-your-own-marmite.html

... will give it a try as I love the stuff!
 
.

Ours used to go as pig feed, once we'd killed the yeast. If you don't kill the yeast first, the pigs blow up!

I saw a youtube vid from the Fullers brewer once. They said they send their used yeast out for pig feed. They didnt say anything about killing it first though. I'm guessing Fullers are responsible for exploded pigs all over the country
 
Hi!
I've just got a picture in my head of pigs expelling alcoholic farts!
Seriously though, I'd have thought that the stomach was too acidic for yeast to thrive.
 
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