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What water?

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NickCarroll

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Hi guys, I live in a soft water area so it isn't bad at all, we get little to no limescale,
I've noticed all the beer brews I've done have this distinct taste that I've asumed is a "homebrew taste" ( I'm new to this, so only done 4 ) after a bit of reading today i've come to the conclusion that it could be chorine. Is cheap spring water a good option or best to purify the tap water?

Thanks in advance
 

foxy

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Hi guys, I live in a soft water area so it isn't bad at all, we get little to no limescale,
I've noticed all the beer brews I've done have this distinct taste that I've asumed is a "homebrew taste" ( I'm new to this, so only done 4 ) after a bit of reading today i've come to the conclusion that it could be chorine. Is cheap spring water a good option or best to purify the tap water?

Thanks in advance
Just add a Campden tablet, or half. I just get my water ready the night before to let the chlorine dissipate.
 

NPi

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Just add a Campden tablet, or half. I just get my water ready the night before to let the chlorine dissipate.
I agree with Foxy, a half should be fine. I have been told the "home brew" taste stems from poor quality temperature control during fermentation and subsequent poor attenuation of the beer.

How do you currently control your temperature during fermentation and does your finishing gravity match that of your expected?
 

JockyBrewer

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I think it’s unlikely to be water related. Generally water in the UK rarely has enough chlorine or chloramine to cause any taste. If you want to be sure then add half a crush campden tablet to the total of your brewing water.

If it’s really a TCP like flavour then it’s more likely to be left over chlorine from a cleaning product. It could also be a wild yeast infection or yeast stress due to temperature.
 

NickCarroll

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Well it's definitely not a TCP flavor move of an over sweet taste, the final gravity is usually close but never on target, the temperature could be the answer as my house isn't the warmest and all the kits seem to come with ale yeast even though I've been doing Pils, cevasas and Oktoberfest brews, I've just bought a belt for my next batch, but alway struggle to get 2nd fermentation going due to the cold, I get very little carbonation so have taken my latest batch to my mothers who keeps her house like a sauna haha
 

NPi

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If your beers taste too sweet, you are probably not achieving full attenuation. Be careful warm temps can be just as bad. Try somewhere at a constant temp, in the range of your yeast.

You could always build a fermentation chamber. This sounds complicated but is not. Lots of friendly advice on the forum.
 

Barkin

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We moved to the Trent Valley near Burton. The water is really like nothing else. Everyone who visits comments too.
 

JockyBrewer

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Well it's definitely not a TCP flavor move of an over sweet taste, the final gravity is usually close but never on target, the temperature could be the answer as my house isn't the warmest and all the kits seem to come with ale yeast even though I've been doing Pils, cevasas and Oktoberfest brews, I've just bought a belt for my next batch, but alway struggle to get 2nd fermentation going due to the cold, I get very little carbonation so have taken my latest batch to my mothers who keeps her house like a sauna haha
I’d consider getting an inkbird temperature controller to go with your heat belt. Then you can wrap the fermenter up in a blanket and it’ll keep it at the perfect temperature.

One thing I’m wondering is whether this is oxidation. Are there any sherry or cardboard like notes in the aroma or flavour?
 

MarconiBrew

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Regarding temperature control, I've got good stable temperature control from using a large bucket like those builders buckets you can get in wickes or B&Q, I put the FV in that, fill the bucket with water and use an aquarium heater. I've got a stable 21c all the time.
 

NickCarroll

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If your beers taste too sweet, you are probably not achieving full attenuation. Be careful warm temps can be just as bad. Try somewhere at a constant temp, in the range of your yeast.

You could always build a fermentation chamber. This sounds complicated but is not. Lots of friendly advice on the forum.
Are there any guides on here?
 

Hazelwood Brewery

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Assuming you’re brewing from grain rather than extract, a beer that’s too sweet may have been mashed at too high a temperature?

At lower mash temperatures the sugars extracted from the grain are more fermentable and are converted to alcohol. At higher mash temperatures the sugars extracted are non-fermentable, they add body and sweetness. A mash temperature of 150F (65C) is considered a good compromise of both but you can move down to 140F (60C) if you want a dryer, thinner beer.
 

Gerryjo

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I'm assuming you're using the kit yeasts that come with them and if so check out other yeast manufacturers that will tolerate your temperature be it cold or hot and as you're focusing on lager type brews this yeast is normally in the 10°/12° whereas a pseudo lager using a Kolsch yeast is happy at 15° and Ale yeasts from 18°/22° now there is room for temp swings but loads of variations to suit all.
 

NPi

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Are there any guides on here?
There is, have a look at the search function, and use titles only. Or look in the how to guide section.

I'm short it's an old fridge, you can find on your local second hand selling site, some form of heater (heat pad, belt, light bulb, bar heater etc) and an inkbird. The inkbird turns on either the cooling of the fridge or the heater, depending on which is required. This keeps your beer at what ever constant temperature you set.
 

Obadiah Boondoggle

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We moved to the Trent Valley near Burton. The water is really like nothing else. Everyone who visits comments too.
Burton is famous for its water for brewing purposes - that why it used to host so many breweries

In many commercial breweries the process of treating water to maximise its brewing potential is known as "burtonisation" - basically making it as similar to the water in Burton as possible
 

Argentum

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Just add a Campden tablet, or half. I just get my water ready the night before to let the chlorine dissipate.
Likely 1/4 of a tablet is plenty for 20-25 Liters, and if well crushed I'm fairly confident that its effect of adequately addressing chlorine or chloramines is nigh on instantaneous.
 
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