Wheelers CAMRA how to..

Discussion in 'Brewing Books & Publications' started by BeerisGOD, Apr 7, 2017.

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  1. Apr 7, 2017 #1

    BeerisGOD

    BeerisGOD

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    Brew beer is on its way to me. Plenty of recepies by sounds of it.
    I couldn't help look at a very small amount of negative reviews about not giving you advise on the best yeast for each beer.
    Thankfully the mangrove jack's site gives great descriptions of they're yeasts so I was considering matching up.
    Does anyone else have a problem knowing which yeast to choose?
    I've mostly used gervin (Nottingham) but I'm now looking for a different path to make sure I'm getting the best flavours from my brews.

    Cheers
     
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  2. Apr 7, 2017 #2

    MyQul

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    I have that book too it's great. I'd also look at the crossmyloof yeasts too as their very cheap.
    Many of the reciepes have sugar in them. Iirc GW uses sugar as he says (at the time of writing, although it's quite easy to make) it would bw easier for brewers to use sugar instead of invert syrup. You can use Golden Syrup as it's partially inverted (or have a go at making invert syrup if you want. There's loads of stuff on the web/internet/this forum and others if you want to have a go)

    Edit: Re-reading your op I may be confusing it with GW's Brew your own british real ale
     
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  3. Apr 7, 2017 #3

    BeerisGOD

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    No I believe it's that one. Has a pint of beer on front with a load of equipment inside it.
    Sounds like a great book.
    I'm hoping it's got a decent IPA recipe. Summers approaching and these ones go down particularly well
     
  4. Apr 7, 2017 #4

    MickDundee

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    I have the book but have never done a recipe from it. I might do in the autumn as I'm planning either a bitter or an 80/- as one of my 3 autumn/winter beers.
     
  5. Apr 7, 2017 #5

    MyQul

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    It's a great book but it doesnt have any IPA recipes in it. It's all Bitters, Milds and a few reciepes for dark (porters/stouts) beer.
    Greg Hughes' Home Brew Beer would suit you better. It has one or two reciepes from almost all of the major beer styles including IPA's (both English and American)
     
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  6. Apr 7, 2017 #6

    BeerisGOD

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    To say I'm not disappointed would be an understatement. Never mind I can still find the odd IPA recipe. Is the key to these to use pale and Munich with plenty of hops added (citra casscade eg) during different stages of the boil with a nice dry hop?

    I'm sure Theyl be a recipe on here I can follow.
     
  7. Apr 7, 2017 #7

    MyQul

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  8. Apr 8, 2017 #8

    BeerisGOD

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  9. Apr 8, 2017 #9

    darrellm

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    Splash out and buy both books - I have, they complement each other.

    An abundance of hoppy US-style beers are a relatively recent thing, my version of the Wheeler book (3rd edition) was written in 2009 before those beers became popular. So it's mainly traditional British ales.

    I've made loads of recipes out of the Wheeler book and most have been great with just the odd average one. My favourites are Summer Lightning, Exmoor Gold, Exmoor Beast, Donnington SBA and Old Peculier. I also made up a decent Mild based on a couple of the recipes.
     
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  10. Apr 8, 2017 #10

    MyQul

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    As Darrell say having both books is deffo an excellent option. I got my GH's book when it was £3 as Amazon. Unfortunately (afaik) it's gone back up to about £8 but still definately worth it. I never even considerered making (pseudo) lagers until reading the lager recipes in the GH's book and realizing many would match my beer tastes
     
  11. Apr 8, 2017 #11

    Kman

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    I've got the Guinness export in the fv waiting to bottle there, my first ag.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
  12. Apr 8, 2017 #12

    MyQul

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    Which version have you got? I have the 3rd. That has a guinness receipe in it but not guinness export (unless of course you just boosted the ABV%)
     
  13. Apr 8, 2017 #13

    BeerCat

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    I normally make mine up as i go along but 5kg extra pale 500g Vienna seems to work well or replace the Vienna with some crystal 30. I found a 15month old IPA in my mates fridge that i had put Oat malt in and that was superb. Still stunk. I uses Apollo for bittering mostly and throw in whatever hops i have available. Same with dry hopping. Punk IPA is a good one to try out.
     
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  14. Apr 8, 2017 #14

    photek1000

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    I can also recommend getting both books, great reads, plenty of recipes and can usually be found at a discount price some where.
     
  15. Apr 8, 2017 #15

    Kman

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    Guinness extra sorry


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  16. Apr 8, 2017 #16

    Honk

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    I too have both books, plenty of recipes to try and the ones I've done have been great, as you say the gw book not suggesting yeasts is a bit of a draw back but a Google search usually reveals what others have used for a particular recipe. Also some of the recipes are available in kit form based on the book so can look to see what yeast they supply with it. (Usually S04 I've found so far).
     
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  17. Apr 8, 2017 #17

    trueblue

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    Graham has posted on other forums because inverted sugar is not easily accessible to the home brewer he formulated the recipes to use white sugar. I bought a 25kg of invert No.2 last year and it does make a difference but I would recommend golden syrup as a good in-between solution.
    The reason he does not state yeast is because only the original brewery yeast will get a perfect clone. Some liquid yeasts are derived from the originals and would be a good option if you can match the correct one, Whitelabs WLP002 comes from Fullers as an example.
    Brewlabs are the best bet to get close matches. Personally I would avoid SO4 like the plague, boring, bland and no character.
    He has been quiet on the other forums as he is in the process of re-writing the Home Brewing book, not the recipe one. After a few years of disagreement with CAMRA, the publisher, and ill health he sounds determined to finish the book.
    As I think he is by far the best writer in home brewing I can't wait.
     
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  18. Apr 8, 2017 #18

    Fil

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    GW's TTL recipe is one of my all time fav brews, am in awe of the chap for that contribution alone ;)
     
  19. Apr 8, 2017 #19

    trueblue

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    Agree a great beer. Wyeast West Yorkshire yeast is reputed to be the Taylor's yeast, one day.
     
  20. Apr 9, 2017 #20

    darrellm

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    Just sampling my first brew from the Greg Hughes book - Northern Bown Ale - served from a keg, wow it's good. :)
     
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