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Wilko sweet newkie brown

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Brewylewy

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Evening all!
I've just opened my first bottle of newkie brown that i made a few weeks ago and I've ended up with a pint of head.
Is there anyway to fix this or have I over primed it when bottling?
I reckon I could have used half the amount of sugar when priming it.
I used 2tsp of light demarera sugar.
 

Griff097

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It changes for beer types, but roughly half a tea spoon for a 330ml bottle I believe?
 

Griff097

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I just noticed you said a few weeks ago, how many weeks was it fermenting and how many weeks in the bottle?
 

Brewylewy

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I just noticed you said a few weeks ago, how many weeks was it fermenting and how many weeks in the bottle?
14 days fermenting and been in the bottle for 9 days (I had to know if they were nice)
 

Griff097

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It's young as you say, did it ferment down the the expected FG?
I'm sure it's over primed but wondering if there are any other factors to be aware of.
There is a priming calculator here if you search for it.
 

obscure

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Brewers friend priming calculator is what I tend to use when I bottle


One big problem with tea spoons is they can vary a lot, one of my teaspoons gives about 4g sugar another 6g. But yes two tea spoons is likely a lot of sugar, so you could easily have 12g sugar per bottle which yes is a lot. I’m not sure if it is into bottle bomb territory (I tend to do ales with lowish levels of carbonation so never being an issue and keg beers needing higher levels of carbonation) hopefully someone else can confirm if this is a concern.

From a practical point you could try getting a large jug and pouring your beer into it let it settle out then pour into your glass.
 

Brewylewy

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Brewers friend priming calculator is what I tend to use when I bottle


One big problem with tea spoons is they can vary a lot, one of my teaspoons gives about 4g sugar another 6g. But yes two tea spoons is likely a lot of sugar, so you could easily have 12g sugar per bottle which yes is a lot. I’m not sure if it is into bottle bomb territory (I tend to do ales with lowish levels of carbonation so never being an issue and keg beers needing higher levels of carbonation) hopefully someone else can confirm if this is a concern.

From a practical point you could try getting a large jug and pouring your beer into it let it settle out then pour into your glass.
Aye I thought that myself, I'll go for the jug because after all the hullabaloo it still is a nice ale
 

Brewylewy

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It's young as you say, did it ferment down the the expected FG?
I'm sure it's over primed but wondering if there are any other factors to be aware of.
There is a priming calculator here if you search for it.
Everything was perfect when I bottled it, i did wonder if i should have used priming sugar instead but i wanted a richer taste at the same time and thought the measurements would have been the same as other posts I had read on here had said it would have been fine
 

darrellm

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Everything sounds fine, you just used 4 times the amount of priming sugar needed per bottle.

I always use half a teaspoon, which some think is too little, but some brews do carry on fermenting a bit in the bottle so it's better to be safe than sorry. Just watch those bottles, exploding bottles and flying glass isn't fun.
 

Brewylewy

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Everything sounds fine, you just used 4 times the amount of priming sugar needed per bottle.

I always use half a teaspoon, which some think is too little, but some brews do carry on fermenting a bit in the bottle so it's better to be safe than sorry. Just watch those bottles, exploding bottles and flying glass isn't fun.
Nothing ventured nothing gained I suppose!
I've got a stout to try next so I'll probably not even put half a tsp in when I bottle it
 
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