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Youngs AIPA help

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Libigage

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Started my 1st Youngs AIPA yesterday, I sprinkled the yeast on top but forgot to stir it in. This morning it's going crazy, do I just let it do its thing or loosen the lid? Looks like there some yeast coming out as well because I didn't stir it.
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lupinehorror

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i normally don't stir the yeast in at all.
maybe a little more headspace (that may be the wrong terminology there) but i guess that's reliant on the size of your FV and batch.
 

terrym

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This seems to be typical of this kit if you brew to the full volume in a 25 litre FV and the background temperature is likely to be more than say 20*C.
So put your FV into a container so that any spillage can be collected. A builders trug is ideal. Allowing excess yeasty krausen to escape through the airlock or a blow off tube is fine until they block, which has happened to me. So in my experience the easiest way to allow the krausen to escape is to crack the lid open a little in one place, put a clean towel over that area and let it ooze out preferably to be collected so it doesn't cause a mess. Then when its stopped oozing, clean everything up, sanitise and replace the airlock.
Finally if you put your FV into a cooler place for a couple of days say at 18*C that might slow it up so it dies back a little, then you can move it back when its over the exuberant stage.
 

Stan76

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Started my 1st Youngs AIPA yesterday, I sprinkled the yeast on top but forgot to stir it in. This morning it's going crazy, do I just let it do its thing or loosen the lid? Looks like there some yeast coming out as well because I didn't stir it. View attachment 34640in
The Youngs APA goes off like a rocket! I’ve just found, after 12 hours, for the second time, it’s blew the lid off my FV and poured krausen over the sides like a volcano. It’ll settle down though - and is good beer.
 

Pavalijo

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I am looking to do this one next (after the Presidents Sierra IPA which started like a rocket for two days but didn’t blow through the airlock).
What would anyone think about adding half the yeast at day one and the rest at day three?
 

GhostShip

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I’ve done the AIPA twice, added all the yeast and didn’t stir (I never do). Fermented at 20C, it was fairly vigorous, but I didn’t get any overflow like that. I’m guessing it might be a bit warm but you don’t say what temperature you’re at. It’s definitely not because you didn’t stir the yeast in.
 

terrym

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I am looking to do this one next (after the Presidents Sierra IPA which started like a rocket for two days but didn’t blow through the airlock).
What would anyone think about adding half the yeast at day one and the rest at day three?
My understanding is you need to add all the yeast at the beginning to allow it to multiply in the aerobic stage to provide enough cells for a healthy fermentation later on.
If you are concerned about krausen escaping either brew a little shorter say 22 or even 21 litres, and/or brew cooler, say 19*C rather 21*C. If you do the latter it will still ferment out, but will just take a longer that's all.
 

Scott Begbie

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I brewed this too. Good to hear positive feedback on this beer. I can confirm that mines was volcanic too, so I just took off the airlock and fitted a blow off tube into a plastic container filled with water. Had to change the water a couple of times over the first few days of fermentation as the krausen was flowing through the blow off tube into the water. Temp in my kitchen varies between 18 and 22 degrees.

I followed to 2/2/2 rule - 2 weeks in primary, bottle, then 2 weeks conditioning and 2 weeks in a cool dark place to clear. I bottled mines into the brown Coopers PET bottles on 21st October, so another week to go before I move them into the loft or shed for a couple of weeks. However, the bottles are already clear and are pretty solid with the carbonation going on. I might need to open one next week just for research purposes!

A lesson learned from brewing the Make Your Own Irish Stout - I put the hops into a mesh bag this time. It helped with the bottling process - with the Irish Stout, I clogged up my bottling wand with hops that were still in suspension, needing to stop every so often to clear the blockage. For the AIPA, I also racked mines to another bucket for bottling so that I didn't run the risk of sucking up any lees when bottling. Good luck with yours!
 

Pavalijo

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My understanding is you need to add all the yeast at the beginning to allow it to multiply in the aerobic stage to provide enough cells for a healthy fermentation later on.
Thanks Terrym, that makes good sense
 

DavidDetroit

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"You're gonna need a bigger boat."

You can get 30l fermenting buckets here so I'd assume there's something similar in the UK. You could also scale down to 19l by just using ratios if that's an issue.
I've never had a batch that even approached overflowing in five years once I did this. the only caveat may be if you use a giant starter.
 

Libigage

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My AIPA is down to 1008 after only 7 days, shall I leave for another 7 days anyway just to clear a bit?
 

Crappyfish

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That's normal...get a spare or fit a blow off tube..
[/QUOTE heard about blow off tube but bit a newbie question but why use a blow off tube I have never heard or seen them.
 

terrym

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My AIPA is down to 1008 after only 7 days, shall I leave for another 7 days anyway just to clear a bit?
I would leave it until its finished, which may turn out to be lower than 1.008, or 12 days which ever is the longest. Then add your hops, leave 2 days in the warm then move to a cold place for another 2 days then bottle.

@Crappyfish
There are plenty of examples on this forum about people using blow off tubes, I suggest you look them up. The theory is simple you have a tube through which the excess krausen can escape without restriction into a water seal in a collection jar or similar, and when the fermentation dies down you re-instate the airlock. Some people actually use them instead of an airlock. In practice they work most of the time to discharge excess krausen but if the yeast is sticky it can block the tube (as I found out) and that backpressures the FV which if left unattended can explosively pop the lid and that can cause a considerable mess ashock1
 

Crappyfish

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I would leave it until its finished, which may turn out to be lower than 1.008, or 12 days which ever is the longest. Then add your hops, leave 2 days in the warm then move to a cold place for another 2 days then bottle.

@Crappyfish
There are plenty of examples on this forum about people using blow off tubes, I suggest you look them up. The theory is simple you have a tube through which the excess krausen can escape without restriction into a water seal in a collection jar or similar, and when the fermentation dies down you re-instate the airlock. Some people actually use them instead of an airlock. In practice they work most of the time to discharge excess krausen but if the yeast is sticky it can block the tube (as I found out) and that backpressures the FV which if left unattended can explosively pop the lid and that can cause a considerable mess ashock1
Thanks never had that problem with over flow thanks I'll take a look
 

Libigage

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I would leave it until its finished, which may turn out to be lower than 1.008, or 12 days which ever is the longest. Then add your hops, leave 2 days in the warm then move to a cold place for another 2 days then bottle.

@Crappyfish
There are plenty of examples on this forum about people using blow off tubes, I suggest you look them up. The theory is simple you have a tube through which the excess krausen can escape without restriction into a water seal in a collection jar or similar, and when the fermentation dies down you re-instate the airlock. Some people actually use them instead of an airlock. In practice they work most of the time to discharge excess krausen but if the yeast is sticky it can block the tube (as I found out) and that backpressures the FV which if left unattended can explosively pop the lid and that can cause a considerable mess ashock1
Thanks for the advice terrym, I have added the hops at 20° for 2 days and now cold crashed. The hops have gone down like a well known ship, does this affect any of the aroma/flavour I would have got if I had left it at 20° for 4 days before kegging/bottling. P.S. I have a 10 litre keg should I keg half and bottle half? If so should I batch prime all of it or only the bottles and use my c02 to carb the keg?
 

terrym

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Thanks for the advice terrym, I have added the hops at 20° for 2 days and now cold crashed. The hops have gone down like a well known ship, does this affect any of the aroma/flavour I would have got if I had left it at 20° for 4 days before kegging/bottling. P.S. I have a 10 litre keg should I keg half and bottle half? If so should I batch prime all of it or only the bottles and use my c02 to carb the keg?
Personally I would maintain the fermentation temperature fro 2 days then crash cool for 2 days.
I would not recommend putting the AIPA in a PB. They are not best suited to the highish carbing levels for an AIPA. Put an ale or stout in your PB though and it will be fine.
 
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