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Old 26-11-2017, 07:27 PM   #11
Kronos
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Looks like there are two versions available, one with 20 recipes and one with 30 recipes.

I just order the 30 recipe version from ebay https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Lager-The...53.m2749.l2649
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Old 26-11-2017, 10:39 PM   #12
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I have just spotted this Lager book, not sure if it a new book out in Oct 2017 or a reprint.

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Lager-Defin...1720763&sr=1-1
It's a new one. Dave is the editor of Zymurgy. I haven't read it yet, but I was impressed with his previous book which was aimed at beginners.
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Old 01-12-2017, 08:38 PM   #13
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The book came today and it is just what I needed. I never knew about Hochkurz mash profile before, a very interesting book indeed.
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Old 02-12-2017, 09:28 AM   #14
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On the subject of lager...it seems that lager is all about the lengthy process of lagering the brew to achieve the required flavour,crispness etc. Do the mass producers actually do this?
You could check out fermenting under pressure , where some folk have success brewing a lager quickly at a higher temperature by keeping the wort under pressure using the co2 produced by the yeast. Easy to set up by the home brewer, though some say that they have success brewing ales using the same method, ale yeast is an entirely different kettle of fish to lager yeast. Makes some interesting reading if nothing else.
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Old 02-12-2017, 10:16 AM   #15
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On the subject of lager...it seems that lager is all about the lengthy process of lagering the brew to achieve the required flavour,crispness etc. Do the mass producers actually do this?
No of course not. They have technology to help them. Lagering does certain things like like dropping the yeast out, modern commercial breweries do this with filters. Basically what lagering does is remove a lot of of by products/unwanted flavours created by the yeast.

https://byo.com/stout/item/870-how-d...ger-so-quickly

"After lagering, most lager brewers want a reduction in diacetyl (butter flavor), acetaldehyde (apple flavor), and sulfur-based aromas (rotten egg); full carbonation; and an improvement in clarity. Most brewers consider diacetyl reduction to be the key goal of lagering. Once these objectives are met the beer is sent to filtration and is packaged."

http://beergraphs.com/bg/212-why-bud...0-days-to-bre/

"Provided the brewer has delivered the desirable flavour and has encouraged the yeast in fermenter to eliminate the generally agreed no-no's (notably vicinal diketones, acetaldehyde and hydrogen sulphide) then there seems little point in leaving the beer hanging around. There is unarguable evidence now that this severely jeopardises foam. Having said which, there are those who maintain that prolonged storage is important not only for the slow purging of undesirable volatiles and adsorption on yeast of unwanted non-volatiles but also for the release of amino acids, peptides, nucleotides and organic and inorganic phosphates, accompanied by an increase in pH. They say it causes an increase in palate fullness and mouthfeel. The evidence is sparse. Why keep prolonged storage, then? For marketing purposes of course."

Also have a look at my post 19 here

http://www.thehomebrewforum.co.uk/sh...t=74279&page=2

This all gives hope those who like me dont have a lager fridge as it means you can use work arounds to to make a half decent pseudo lager
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