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Old 01-12-2016, 10:14 PM   #21
clarkeuk
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Great write up strange -Steve thanks for taking the time to do so this will help me no end in the very near future
Are the kh and ca test kits you use of the fish keeping /aquarium kind
Thanks again

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Old 01-12-2016, 10:15 PM   #22
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So i am using Reverse Osmosis water i should have zero alkilinity am i right? I presume it should be fairly easy to adjust neutral water but still finding it hard. I have gypsum and epsom salts but so far all i have managed is to add 1g per 10l of gypsum for all my beers. Any help steering me in the right direction is much appreciated.
Correct, for RO water you can assume zero alkalinity (it's not quite but close enough for us).

When using RO you can skip step 1, chlorine removal, because that's already done.

For pale beers you can skip step 2 also, but you will need to increase alkalinity for darker beers using sodium bicarbonate.

Step 3 is definitely required if using RO, just use the little table at the bottom to add about 100ppm of calcium. For a hoppy beer you'd want about 0.45g/l of gypsum, for a balanced beer use 0.2g/l each of gypsum and calcium chloride, and for a malty beer use 0.25g/l calcium chloride and 0.1g/l gypsum.
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Old 01-12-2016, 10:23 PM   #23
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Are the kh and ca test kits you use of the fish keeping /aquarium kind
Thanks again

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The very same
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Old 01-12-2016, 11:17 PM   #24
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The very same


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Old 01-12-2016, 11:51 PM   #25
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Correct, for RO water you can assume zero alkalinity (it's not quite but close enough for us).

When using RO you can skip step 1, chlorine removal, because that's already done.

For pale beers you can skip step 2 also, but you will need to increase alkalinity for darker beers using sodium bicarbonate.

Step 3 is definitely required if using RO, just use the little table at the bottom to add about 100ppm of calcium. For a hoppy beer you'd want about 0.45g/l of gypsum, for a balanced beer use 0.2g/l each of gypsum and calcium chloride, and for a malty beer use 0.25g/l calcium chloride and 0.1g/l gypsum.
Thanks Steve, i think thats just about sinking in. I cannot wait to put this into practice next brew. I had read that calcium chloride is an alternative to gypsum and i wrongly presumed was the same. Headache inducing stuff lol. Few more questions if you dont mind.
Is this the stuff i need? http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Sodium-Car...M6Qm1wBPKC12Aw
And what is the difference in effect between the above and epsom salts? I can remember my grandad having a spoon in water.
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Old 02-12-2016, 08:57 AM   #26
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No the stuff in your link is sodium carbonate which isn't the same as sodium bicarbonate. The stuff you want is baking soda/bicarbonate of soda which you can get in the baking section of tesco.
Epsom salts is magnesium sulphate which isn't really required for brewing, even with RO water, because the mash adds more than enough magnesium to the wort.
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Old 02-12-2016, 10:13 AM   #27
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Fab post Steve, will use this for sure as water chemistry is something I've never really bothered with before. Thanks!
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Old 02-12-2016, 12:24 PM   #28
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Excellent Steve, very much appreciated! Without your help i dread to think how much longer it would of taken to get a grip on. Awesome information.
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Old 02-12-2016, 01:40 PM   #29
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Fab post Steve, will use this for sure as water chemistry is something I've never really bothered with before. Thanks!
I think it's something everyone should consider, it's simple to do, adds hardly any time to your brew day, but can have a big impact. Water chemistry is one of the few variables which consistently makes a noticeable difference in the Brulosophy experiments.
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Old 02-12-2016, 01:50 PM   #30
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Could one of the mods ( @Chippy_Tea ) possibly make a small edit to the OP, just to reflect current trend? There is a paragraph under point 3 which says:
Quote:
So put simply, use gypsum for hoppy beers like IPAs and use calcium chloride for rich, malty beers like mild and Scotch ale. If brewing a more balanced beer like an English bitter, use a combination. Add enough to bring your calcium up to around 100ppm or more using the following information
I'd like if possible to change it to the following:
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So put simply, use gypsum for hoppy beers like IPAs and use calcium chloride for rich, malty beers like mild and Scotch ale. If brewing a more balanced beer like an English bitter, use a combination. One notable exception to this is the New England IPA, which despite being extremely hoppy, tends to use chloride rich water rather than sulphate, so calcium chloride should be used rather than gypsum. This adds to the full bodied, juiciness common to the style.

Add enough to bring your calcium up to around 100ppm or more using the following information:
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