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Old 12-06-2017, 06:52 PM   #1251
MyQul
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Oh Oh,
better get some big containers for all the new malts etc and more room in the fridge for any opened yeast's
You forgot to mention chucking the useless stuff out the freezer, like food. To make room for all those half used packets of hops
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Old 12-06-2017, 07:07 PM   #1252
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You forgot to mention chucking the useless stuff out the freezer, like food. To make room for all those half used packets of hops
Yup,
either that OR
get another freezer for em
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Old 13-06-2017, 08:25 AM   #1253
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no spare airlocks - scrunched up kitchen paper will maintain a fly barrier and a tinsy winsy over pressure in the fermentor - I always think lateral with brewing and gardening.....
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Old 13-06-2017, 08:59 AM   #1254
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no spare airlocks - scrunched up kitchen paper will maintain a fly barrier and a tinsy winsy over pressure in the fermentor - I always think lateral with brewing and gardening.....
I've never used an airlock. Just cover the FV with cling film held on with a elastic band
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Old 13-06-2017, 02:08 PM   #1255
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I've never used an airlock. Just cover the FV with cling film held on with a elastic band
Bet you're one of these jokers who tie clingfilm to bog seats
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Old 18-06-2017, 06:58 PM   #1256
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If you've made a few kits and/or extract brews, why not have a go at a simple AG brew, to see the difference it makes? A small batch of AG beer is not difficult and you will discover the difference and feel the joy and pride of making it from scratch. All you need for 5 litres is 1kg of Maris Otter, or other pale malt, a packet of hops, and a sachet of yeast. You just need a thermometer, a decent sized pan and something to strain the grain from the wort. A big sieve, or a piece of cloth in a colander. A bag that fills the pan and,drapes over the sides and holds the grains, made from muslin or voile, is ideal. You also need a hydrometer to check the gravity before and after fermentation.

Recipe:
  • 1kg Maris Otter (about �£1.50)
  • One packet of hops (any you like - EKG, Citra, Amarillo, Galaxy, Fuggles, First gold etc) (About �£3-4, but you will only use 15g of the 100g, so cost is around 50p)
  • One packet of yeast, 3g dried yeast is enough. (50p ish)

Method:

1. Heat 3 litres of water to 75C in big pan.
2. Pour in the pale malt while stirring - get rid of lumps.
3. Check temp is 65-70C - adjust if necessary with cold or boiling water.
4. Wrap a thick towel round the pot and leave alone for one hour.
5. Strain into a bucket or other vessel through sieve, or colander lined with cloth.
6. Heat another 4 litres of water to 80C and add the grains back to it. Leave 10 mins, stir, and strain the liquid to your bucket. You should have about 6 litres, which will reduce when you boil it for an hour.
7. Dispose of grains, add wort to pan and bring to boil.
8. Add 5 grams of hops when boiling point is reached.
9. 55 Mins later add 5 to 10g of hops, depending on your hoppiness requirements, boil another 5 mins and switch off.
10. Cool the wort in sink, with lid on, add to sterilised FV/demijohn via sterilised sieve to catch hops, and top up the level to 5 litres if necessary. Pitch yeast at around 18 - 20C.

[Measure the amount of water added if you top up the FV, and add this amount to the sparge water next time you brew]

You should get 8 or 9 x 500ml bottles of lovely beer for about �£2.50. It takes me about 3 hours start to finish, making 10 litre batches in this way (see below).

10 Litre option: You can just double all the quantities and make 10 Litres, which is what I do most of the time, it's a good amount of beer. About 18x500ml bottles, or 27x330ml bottles. You just need a 15ish litre pot.

If you've never made an all grain beer it's really worth giving this a go.

Here's a youtube video that shows the method quite well:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fPRLc9-C73Y
Thanks so much Clibit - you inspired me to have a go at my first all-grain brew last week (after a few kit brews in the past), and can't wait to give it a try!
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Old 20-06-2017, 07:38 PM   #1257
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I made my first 5L AG brew a week and a half ago, using Boadicea hops. Checked the FG for the first time today and it is down to 1014, I will give it a few more days before bottling, despite the recent heat.

When taking a cheeky sip or two out of the hydrometer jar, I found the hop flavour slightly underderwhelming. I bought the Boadicea hops based on the published flavour profile "light floral, spicy", but the proof of the beer is in the drinking.

That was when I had an idea, I'm planning on doing a 10L batch of Summer Ale from Greg Hughes book this weekend, for a weekend family get together in late July, which specifies Goldings and Progress hops. I have some Goldings in the freezer, but would need to buy some Progress or maybe Fuggles on Saturday, so I tried mixing some of my Boadicea ale with some Bath Ales Gem, which is all Goldings and what a revelation, it improved both, imparting a light lemon flavour to the earthy Goldings taste. I reckon I will need about 4:1 Goldings to Boadicea and I'll let you know how it turns out.
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Old 02-07-2017, 04:49 PM   #1258
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I made my first 5L AG brew a week and a half ago, using Boadicea hops. Checked the FG for the first time today and it is down to 1014, I will give it a few more days before bottling, despite the recent heat.

When taking a cheeky sip or two out of the hydrometer jar, I found the hop flavour slightly underderwhelming. I bought the Boadicea hops based on the published flavour profile "light floral, spicy", but the proof of the beer is in the drinking.

That was when I had an idea, I'm planning on doing a 10L batch of Summer Ale from Greg Hughes book this weekend, for a weekend family get together in late July, which specifies Goldings and Progress hops. I have some Goldings in the freezer, but would need to buy some Progress or maybe Fuggles on Saturday, so I tried mixing some of my Boadicea ale with some Bath Ales Gem, which is all Goldings and what a revelation, it improved both, imparting a light lemon flavour to the earthy Goldings taste. I reckon I will need about 4:1 Goldings to Boadicea and I'll let you know how it turns out.
The AG Boadicea has now been in the bottles for just over a week and has been moved to the garage to chill (as best it can in this weather). So I've just tried one and initial impressions; it was a bit cloudy and a bit flat, then when I tasted it, it was lovely, not a strong hop flavour, but a beautiful gentle summer beer, extremely drinkable.

I did a second batch a few days later, with Ahtanum and I couldn't resist trying one of these too, a much more pronounced hop flavour, but lovely too. I now have 10L of the Goldings / Boadicea Summer Ale in the FV, to which I added half a protofloc tablet, I hope this will help reduce the cloudiness.

Thanks Clibit, you have got me hooked on AG.
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