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Old 29-06-2016, 01:56 PM   #1
glynb
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Default It's a funny thing this yeast.

I've had a lager in the brew fridge for around eight weeks now and it's still bubbling away quite happily.. at 4c??

I thought lowering the temperature would have made the yeast dormant. I wish it'd hurry up though as I'm quite thirsty!
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Old 29-06-2016, 10:34 PM   #2
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Lowering the temperature only slows down the fermentation process; which is why raw meat kept in a fridge has a Best Before date that is usually measured in days.

Brewing a beer at such low temperatures is called "Lagering", hence the product is called Lager ...

... and the fermentation can take so many weeks that you may die of thirst before it's ready to drink.

The good news is that the end product is potentially a very crisp and delightful tasting beer that is well worth waiting for.

So, be patient and enjoy the lager; in a few weeks time!

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Just noticed how long you've been on the Forum! Presume I'm teaching Granny (or in this case Grandad) how to suck eggs!
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Old 30-06-2016, 11:14 AM   #3
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Originally Posted by glynb View Post
I've had a lager in the brew fridge for around eight weeks now and it's still bubbling away quite happily.. at 4c??

I thought lowering the temperature would have made the yeast dormant. I wish it'd hurry up though as I'm quite thirsty!
Lagering/cold condtioning temps are about 2C so I drop the temp a couple of degrees
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Old 30-06-2016, 11:33 AM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dutto View Post
Lowering the temperature only slows down the fermentation process; which is why raw meat kept in a fridge has a Best Before date that is usually measured in days.

Brewing a beer at such low temperatures is called "Lagering", hence the product is called Lager ...

... and the fermentation can take so many weeks that you may die of thirst before it's ready to drink.

The good news is that the end product is potentially a very crisp and delightful tasting beer that is well worth waiting for.

So, be patient and enjoy the lager; in a few weeks time!

PS


Just noticed how long you've been on the Forum! Presume I'm teaching Granny (or in this case Grandad) how to suck eggs!
I think you re a little confused.
All high protein food will have a "Use By" date and should be used by this date.
Low risk food will have a "Best Before" date. This is to say that this food is at its best before the stated day
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Old 30-06-2016, 12:10 PM   #5
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Originally Posted by Dutto View Post
Brewing a beer at such low temperatures is called "Lagering", hence the product is called Lager ...
Its the cold conditioning phase that gives the name to the style rather than the cold fermention phase. Lagern in german means 'to store'
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Old 30-06-2016, 10:05 PM   #6
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I think you re a little confused.
All high protein food will have a "Use By" date and should be used by this date.
Low risk food will have a "Best Before" date. This is to say that this food is at its best before the stated day
I'm pretty sure everyone knew what I meant so more "can't be bothered" than "confused".
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Coopers Stout Kit + Grain (15/06/17)
AG Vienna Lager with Hallertau (12/11/17)
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Wilco's Pilsner with Lowicz Cherry Syrup (12/11/17)
AG Low ABV Pale Ale (19/11/17)

Carbonating/Conditioning
Spiced Pumpkin Ale

Fermenting
Golden Pumpkin Ale
AG Oatmeal Stout

Note:
(**/**/**) = Date ready to drink.
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Old 30-06-2016, 10:13 PM   #7
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Its the cold conditioning phase that gives the name to the style rather than the cold fermention phase. Lagern in german means 'to store'
In German a Lager beer is called a "Lagerbier" not a "Lagernbier" ...

... but I'm sure you are correct.
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Living more in hope than expectation; and seldom disappointed.

Drinking
Coopers Stout Kit + Grain (15/06/17)
AG Vienna Lager with Hallertau (12/11/17)
Wilco's Hoppy Copper Bitter (12/11/17)
Wilco's Pilsner with Lowicz Cherry Syrup (12/11/17)
AG Low ABV Pale Ale (19/11/17)

Carbonating/Conditioning
Spiced Pumpkin Ale

Fermenting
Golden Pumpkin Ale
AG Oatmeal Stout

Note:
(**/**/**) = Date ready to drink.
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Old 30-06-2016, 10:13 PM   #8
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How soon after brewing did you drop to to 4 degrees? I usally stick at 12 degrees for two weeks and decant then drop to 3 or degrees. Anyone else the same?

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Old 01-07-2016, 07:48 AM   #9
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Have you tested the SG and tasted a sample?

Apparantly the cold temperature (Before you start Largering) is only necessary for the first 2/3rds of the fermentation to suppress ester formation. Many brewers increase the beer to ale fermentation temperatures for the last few days to remove dyactyl.

You could take a sample and see how close it is to what you expect. If it still has a way to go you could increase the temperature to finish it out. This will also help clean the beer up.

If you are well below and it has a funny taste, it may not be the yeast that is causing the bubbling.

Paul
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Old 01-07-2016, 08:00 AM   #10
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Originally Posted by Dutto View Post
In German a Lager beer is called a "Lagerbier" not a "Lagernbier" ...

... but I'm sure you are correct.
The beer itself (and style) is called "Lagerbier" (in a similar way to us just calling it lager) but the name is derived from the word "Lagern", . Should have made myself a little more clear
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