Register Now!
The HomeBrew Forum > Beer Brewing Talk > General Beer Discussion > Variables???

Help Support The Homebrew Forum by donating using the link above or becoming a Supporting Member.
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 27-11-2017, 04:59 PM   #1
Dutto
Dutto
 
Dutto's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2016
Location: East Lincolnshire
Posts: 3,760
Liked 1837 Times on 1300 Posts
Likes Given: 3961

Default Variables???

Here are some (but NOT all) of the variables in AG brewing:

1. The Grain. (There are dozens of types available.)

2. The Mill. (From "flour" to "just cracked".)

3. The Mash. (From a fixed time and temperature to multiple times at multiple temperatures.)

4. The Yeast. (God only knows how many varieties there are; but I don't!)

5. The Fermentation time and temperature. (Again a multiplication of time and temperature.)

6. The Carbonation and Conditioning. (Another multiplication of time and temperature.)

Add on all of the other elements available and most brains will go into meltdown!

May I suggest that:

1. Brewing is a pastime and NOT a scientific experiment.

2. Recommendations on the Forum are just that; and NOT the only way to brew anything.

Please feel free to comment!
__________________
Dutto

Living more in hope than expectation; and seldom disappointed.

Drinking
Coopers Stout Kit + Grain (15/06/17)
AG Vienna Lager with Hallertau (12/11/17)
Wilco's Hoppy Copper Bitter (12/11/17)
Wilco's Pilsner with Lowicz Cherry Syrup (12/11/17)
AG Low ABV Pale Ale (19/11/17)

Carbonating/Conditioning
Spiced Pumpkin Ale

Fermenting
Golden Pumpkin Ale
AG Oatmeal Stout

Note:
(**/**/**) = Date ready to drink.
Dutto is offline  
2
People Like This 
Reply With Quote
Old 27-11-2017, 05:05 PM   #2
Ajhutch
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2016
Posts: 999
Liked 378 Times on 288 Posts
Likes Given: 474

Default

I agree with the spirit of your post. But. Most of us are treating Brewing as a pastime but we probably all still want to make the best beer that we can. And if some other people have treated Brewing as science and we can use their work to improve our enjoyment of our pastime it makes sense to do so. And it makes sense to make all of that information available to members who ask questions. Just because a quotation from a research paper or a book and somebody's accumulated experience are not identical doesn't make either of them invalid, it makes for an interesting thing for a brewer to consider.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
__________________
Upcoming brews
- American Amber Ale with Rye
- Belgian Dubbel
- Imperial Stout
- Brown Ale
Ajhutch is offline  
3
People Like This 
Reply With Quote
Old 27-11-2017, 05:10 PM   #3
Irishwizard
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2016
Posts: 230
Liked 87 Times on 67 Posts
Likes Given: 13

Default

Didn't realise you had a foot of snow in Lincs today.!! (work it out) I agree, just brew and enjoy the results, but some folks are just a bit ultra competitive.
Irishwizard is offline  
2
People Like This 
Reply With Quote
Old 27-11-2017, 05:15 PM   #4
MyQul
Chairman of the Bored
THBF_MODERATOR.png
 
MyQul's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Location: Royal Hamlet of Peckham. London.
Posts: 12,717
Liked 4399 Times on 3331 Posts
Likes Given: 4623

Default

The way I see it is brewing is extremely simple (mash, boil, ferment. Thats it) but at the same time extremely complicated (for everyone of these steps you can slice them into loads of different variables.)
So for the brewer who just wants to make beer as easily as possible s/he ignores all the 'slices' and just follows, mash, boil, ferment. You'll invariably end up with beer.
But then you get into the hobby side of it and you can delve as deeply as you like into every one of these variable. You'll still invariably end up with beer

It all depends how far down the rabbit hole you want to go
__________________

"For a quart of ale is a dish for a king" - William Shakespeare







MyQul is offline  
4
People Like This 
Reply With Quote
Old 27-11-2017, 05:48 PM   #5
simon12
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2014
Posts: 1,096
Liked 285 Times on 234 Posts
Likes Given: 107

Default

You can just make beer you like and not worry about much or try to tweek every last little detail to improve, as long as you like drinking it there no wrong way.
simon12 is offline  
3
People Like This 
Reply With Quote
Old 27-11-2017, 05:59 PM   #6
strange-steve
Quantum Brewer
 
strange-steve's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2014
Location: Galle Crater, Mars
Posts: 1,987
Liked 954 Times on 635 Posts
Likes Given: 301

Default

I think that's part of the beauty of brewing, it appeals to a wide variety of people, whether you just want some cheap booze as simply as possible or want to delve into the incredibly complex chemistry involved, or somewhere in between.

You may be happy to just brew a beer that suits you, over and over, you may want to replicate a particular commercial beer, or you may want to brew "perfectly to style" to win competitions. There's nothing wrong with any of those, and how seriously you take brewing is entirely up to you and as long as you are happy then nobody can tell you you're wrong.
__________________
"We're all puppets... I'm just a puppet who can see the strings."
strange-steve is online now  
6
People Like This 
Reply With Quote
Old 27-11-2017, 06:00 PM   #7
Sadfield
Senior Member
 
Sadfield's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2016
Location: Macclesfield
Posts: 898
Liked 429 Times on 290 Posts
Likes Given: 92

Default

Damn right it's a hobby. However, brewing is a process bound by science, and giving out advice that flies in the face of basic scientific principles won't help anyone brew good beer, regardless how seriously they take it. The skill in brewing (or any production process) is limiting variables, and understanding the science of a process is a great tool in doing that.

May I suggest that:

1. Brewing is a chain of complex bio-chemical interactions.

2. Posts on the Forum should be factually correct and shouldn't be dumbed down to suit certain members; however the application of knowledge is NOT the only way to brew anything.

Please feel free to comment.
__________________
http://www.macchomebrew.club

Last edited by Slid; 09-12-2017 at 10:00 PM. Reason: Inserting a main verb into a sentence.
Sadfield is online now  
2
People Like This 
Reply With Quote
Old 27-11-2017, 06:02 PM   #8
MyQul
Chairman of the Bored
THBF_MODERATOR.png
 
MyQul's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Location: Royal Hamlet of Peckham. London.
Posts: 12,717
Liked 4399 Times on 3331 Posts
Likes Given: 4623

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by simon12 View Post
You can just make beer you like and not worry about much or try to tweek every last little detail to improve, as long as you like drinking it there no wrong way.
And to paraphrase, "...as long as you're having fun this is no wrong way"
__________________

"For a quart of ale is a dish for a king" - William Shakespeare







MyQul is offline  
Sadfield Likes This 
Reply With Quote
Old 27-11-2017, 06:10 PM   #9
MyQul
Chairman of the Bored
THBF_MODERATOR.png
 
MyQul's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Location: Royal Hamlet of Peckham. London.
Posts: 12,717
Liked 4399 Times on 3331 Posts
Likes Given: 4623

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sadfield View Post
Damn right it's a hobby. However, brewing is a process bound by science, and giving out advice that flies in the face of basic scientific principles won't help anyone brew good beer, regardless how seriously they take it. The skill in brewing (or any production process) is limiting variables, and understanding the science of a process is a great tool in doing that.

May I suggest that:

1. Brewing is a chain of complex bio-chemical interactions.

2. Posts on the Forum should factually correct and shouldn't be dumbed down to suit certain members; however the application of knowledge is NOT the only way to brew anything.

Please feel free to comment.
I think this is the difference between the basic kit (like mine. Pot. BIAB. FV. plus sundry kitchen equipment) and more complicated kit like an electric 3V system or a Braumeiseter. I can make just as good beer as you could with this more complicated kit but with that sort of kit you've got loads more control over the variables and can do thinks like consistancy of data (such as efficiency figures) and reliable repeatition of recipes
__________________

"For a quart of ale is a dish for a king" - William Shakespeare







MyQul is offline  
2
People Like This 
Reply With Quote
Old 27-11-2017, 06:43 PM   #10
Sadfield
Senior Member
 
Sadfield's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2016
Location: Macclesfield
Posts: 898
Liked 429 Times on 290 Posts
Likes Given: 92

Default

Exactly. The invention of the automated homebrew system is a way of controlling the mash temperature variable and is a response to the scientific knowledge of how temperature affects the mash process. Any advantage can easily be undone without a knowledge of the science of fermentation.

The beauty of this hobby is that there is always something to learn, with the reward of incremental gains in quality.
__________________
http://www.macchomebrew.club
Sadfield is online now  
 
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump

Newest Threads