Hop plants/rhizomes - growing report

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EKG did much better with 1200g wet and still drying.
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Looks similar to how I dried mine last year. In brew bags hung from the light fitting in front of the AC on fan setting. Took about 24 hours to dry fully.

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Not sure SWMBO would approve but loving the system.
I harvest my hops when the outer cone leaves start to brown but not sure if that is the right point?
Also what is the usual weight loss as my Fuggles reduced to a third over a week which didn’t seem like enough with what I’ve read on some threads?
 
Fortunately the weather was still fine and hot I when I picked my Prima Donna hops (and the local hedgerow foraged ones).
Spread in a combination of open lattice-bottomed fruit and veg. trays and garden sieves lined with food-covering netting.
These were put up across the joists in my light excluded garage and shed, which were pretty warm at the time.
I added air movement with a fairly large-sized oscillating room fan underneath, but NOT pointing directly upwards!
I thought it was a fair approximation of an Oast house.
When crisp and rustley, I heat seal bagged them with an air extraction nozzle Pifco bag heat sealer.
Then frozen as well to make sure.
About 2kg in all (dry).
 
I harvest my hops when the outer cone leaves start to brown but not sure if that is the right point?
It's a delicate balancing act, made more difficult by the weather this year which saw everything ripen super-quickly in that sunny weather last week, after a slow start.

Your nose is the best guide, but in general you want to harvest no later than when there's one or two brown scales on <10% of the cones. Any hint of garlic means that you've missed the peak time, you need to harvest earlier next year....
 
My cascade has a bit of an underwhelming crop again. It is nearly there but still needs a wee bit longer. Though I'm normally at least a week later than this anyway.

Happily the cutting I took this spring has also got a few cones, though its well intertwined with the raspberries!

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My cascade has a bit of an underwhelming crop again. It is nearly there but still needs a wee bit longer. Though I'm normally at least a week later than this anyway.

Happily the cutting I took this spring has also got a few cones, though its well intertwined with the raspberries!

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😅
I looked at photo #1 and thought, "those leaves don't look like hops, what has he grown there?".
Before reading your, "well intertwined with the raspberries!" comment.
😅
From cutting to hops (even if only a few) in a single season,
hops truly are a vigorous weed!
 
It's a delicate balancing act, made more difficult by the weather this year which saw everything ripen super-quickly in that sunny weather last week, after a slow start.

Your nose is the best guide, but in general you want to harvest no later than when there's one or two brown scales on <10% of the cones. Any hint of garlic means that you've missed the peak time, you need to harvest earlier next year....
Interested in the garlic Aroma mention,
I thought I would rub and sniff the remaining local hedgerow hops still on the bine yesterday evening.
Hop condition: lots of brown scales on >90% of them. In other words, only a few in the shade with no browning seen.
Aroma: Definitely onion to garlic on first rub. Probably closer to Ransomes (wild garlic) from some, the greener ones, still moist on the rub.
Some time later the garlic seemed to have dissipated and the stickiness left in the hand seemed more typically attractively hoppy.
I wouldn't pick or brew with them - well not beer I think I would drink anyway. 🤮
So, local hop harvest is now over, well for me and these close-Goldings relatives around me in Kent anyway.
So now it's back to brewing with what I've got, and looking forward to next year's hop growing season.
 
Finally got everything bagged up with the vacuum sealer, a total of 925g dry.
  • Styrian Golding 125g
  • Challenger 200g
  • Cascade 600g
The Styrian Golding & Challenger were ravaged by bugs in that June heatwave so I was thankfull to get any at all as the bines looked dead. Cascade was the star this year with a bumper crop, last year it was Challenger. On to 2024!

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