Barley Wine

Discussion in 'Beer Kit Brewing Discussion.' started by kakistos_uk, Dec 1, 2017.

  1. Dec 1, 2017 #1

    kakistos_uk

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    I really like malt heavy beers, I'm not a bitter/hop heavy fan.

    Everything I've read suggests that I'd like barley wine. Has anyone done one? Is there a kit you can recommend?

    Any kits you done and additions that you can recommend?

    I'm not particularly fussed about it being strong (ABV), just malty.

    Thanks as always!

    :thumb:
     
  2. Dec 1, 2017 #2

    IainM

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    Barley wine is, by definition, a very strong beer. If you want something malt forward then perhaps a Scottish brew or a mild would be good. Geordie do both as kits, though I haven't tried them.
     
  3. Dec 1, 2017 #3

    kakistos_uk

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    I've got a wee heavy bubbling away!

    I'd like to try as many different types as I can.
     
  4. Dec 1, 2017 #4

    MarkBowie

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    Look up the Brewferm kits. They need long time conditioning to smooth out but any time after 4 months they are all lovely. Christmas especially and you will start to see offers on them soon.
     
  5. Dec 1, 2017 #5

    jceg316

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    I like barleywines but find them quite hard to pull off, mostly due to impatience. They need long conditioning times, 6 - 12 months, and what I find I get wrong is the bittering hop addition. Because they are so malt heavy, there does need to be a big bittering addition to balance out the flavours, and I have always gone easy on this meaning the barleywines I've made are rich and quite sweet, and usually have alcohol flavours which are a bit too strong. I think that latter bit is down to too warm fermentation temps though.

    When I want malt I usually have a german pils/helles or a stout.
     
  6. Dec 1, 2017 #6

    BeerCat

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    Exactly how mine come out, sweet without enough bite to balance them out.
     
  7. Dec 4, 2017 #7

    kakistos_uk

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    Thanks for the advice. I'll have a look at Brewferm.

    I've seen a couple from youngs/muntons. I've never used these suppliers - do you have thoughts about them in general?
     
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  8. Dec 5, 2017 #8

    kakistos_uk

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    I'm not familiar with helles - could you tell me more about which kit/extract recipe you prefer? I'm a big malt lover and want to get a good variety of things I can make.

    Thanks!
     
  9. Dec 5, 2017 #9

    MyQul

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    Helles is a German lager. It was originally invented to compete with Pilsners. Although malt forward its fully attenuated and designed to showcase the base malts rather than hops
     
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  10. Dec 5, 2017 #10

    jceg316

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    As @myQul says, it's a German style lager very similar to pilsner. In my experience there is very little difference between the two, I think helles is supposed to be more malt based. I really like Augustiner Helles, which is available Beerhawk and probably other online beer shops.

    I don't use kits but have some all grain recipes. If this is useful I'll copy and paste some.

    I'd recommend looking into some other German styles which are malt based, like dopplebock, bock, marzen/oktoberfest, maibock etc.
     
  11. Dec 5, 2017 #11

    terrym

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    Why not try a commercial barley wine before you brew a batch to see if it actually meets your expectations. Its certainly different to your average pint of best bitter.
    Robinsons Old Tom just about passes for a barley wine, and Gold Label, which is now sold in cans, is still sold as barley wine but is apparently not as strong as it used to be. Both are sold in some supermarkets, and some Robbo's pubs might sell Old Tom in cask if you live in the NW. Other brands may be available..... :whistle:
     
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  12. Dec 6, 2017 #12

    kakistos_uk

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    If you have a few recipes - that'd be great! I've been reading about bock and wanted to give it a go. I like lager when I was younger (and didnt know better) but now feel it is bland compared to beer/ale. I like heavier bodied beers. A lager in this style interests me!!

    Thanks again.
     
  13. Dec 8, 2017 #13

    jceg316

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    This is my "go to" pils recipe. I usually change something every time though, like different hops, throw in another malt etc http://brew.grainfather.com/recipes/27896. Here's another pils recipe: http://brew.grainfather.com/recipes/4063

    If you're into smoked beer at all, this recipe came out well: http://brew.grainfather.com/recipes/15128

    Here's a dopplebock recipe: http://brew.grainfather.com/recipes/3874 I'd say it needs a long conditioning time, perhaps 6 months or so. If you can't do that in a demijohn then keep it in a fermenter for as long and possible do the rest in bottles.

    This beer was simple and came out malty with suitable yeast flavours coming through: https://www.brewtoad.com/recipes/graveyard-of-flies

    This beer I made once before, but can't find the original recipe. DO NOT use Junga for a flavour addition because it ruined the beer. Use spalt. https://www.brewtoad.com/recipes/celebration-beer-689e83. For the toasted malt, take the amount stated and put it in the oven at 180C for 15 mins and it gives the beer a really nice nutty flavour.
     
  14. Dec 8, 2017 #14

    jceg316

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