Metal beer

The Homebrew Forum

Help Support The Homebrew Forum:

This site may earn a commission from merchant affiliate links, including eBay, Amazon, and others.
Joined
Dec 13, 2020
Messages
5,746
Reaction score
9,150
Location
York, UK
Well I'm extremely disappointed and upset.

Just kegged my first beer out my new GF30, and it has a horrible metal taste. Wondering what I've done wrong? Could it be I haven't cleaned it properly, or is it leeching some kind of nasty flavour out the metal?

Got a very large drink and I'm sulking now. I was planning on conditioning it while we were on holiday, and then drinking it in January. It's a lager.

#SENDHELP
 
Just been reading about malt hydrolysis, and I think now I suspect that as the culprit.

The bottom of the malt box did get wet at one point, as our boiler has been leaking. All the malts were in sealed plastic bags though.

Annoying, as I've another recipe I was gonna brew tomorrow and if that's what's happened I'll have to chuck the malt.
 
Last edited:
Well I'm extremely disappointed and upset.

Just kegged my first beer out my new GF30, and it has a horrible metal taste. Wondering what I've done wrong? Could it be I haven't cleaned it properly, or is it leeching some kind of nasty flavour out the metal?

Got a very large drink and I'm sulking now. I was planning on conditioning it while we were on holiday, and then drinking it in January. It's a lager.

#SENDHELP
You are tasting the mild steel so the chromium coating has broken down somewhere. Check it out and see if there are any poor welds or pit marks. If nothing looks untoward you will just need to passivate the vessel. The acid and air will fix it.
 
Just wondering, are you sure it is a metallic flavour? Has someone else confirmed metallic? I only ask because a nephew recently brought round a beer which he thought tasted metallic, but to me it tasted medicinal. Could it be subconscious anxiety about new kit makes you think of metallic?

Did switching to the new FV introduce any changes to your process?

Funnily enough I was about to ask you how you were getting in with your GF30 but I guess now I know. Sorry to hear it has been so disappointing.
 
Yep definitely metallic. Tastes like I've been handling copper coins and then putting my hands in my mouth. Not pleasant.

It's the same taste you get in your mouth when pregnant as well 😝

Nope I haven't really changed anything else about my brewing, apart from yeast dumping, but only because it's the first fermenter I've had that's allowed it.
 
Yep definitely metallic. Tastes like I've been handling copper coins and then putting my hands in my mouth. Not pleasant.

It's the same taste you get in your mouth when pregnant as well 😝

Nope I haven't really changed anything else about my brewing, apart from yeast dumping, but only because it's the first fermenter I've had that's allowed it.
Could be a wee late surprise one 🤰🍼
 
What you are tasting is iron. I would out it down to the yeast and your process and not so much the equipment, unless your mash tan is really old and damaged.

Excessive iron to the point of creating a metallic taste can be caused by multiple factors.

The Yeast
Yeast and iron have an interesting relationship. Many different yeast strains are rich in iron, and yeast grows and ferments better when iron is present. Thanks to the presence of iron in most grains, including wheat, oats, and barley, yeast tends to ferment these grains just fine.

During the mashing process, when ground grains are boiled and literally “mashed in” to make a thick wort, the trace amounts of iron in the grains are released and they will serve the yeast well once it is added to the wort.

Yeast also carries iron that it does not typically release into the wort. If the levels of iron are too high in the wort, however, the iron locked into the yeast cells will “autolyse” or break out of the cell wall and dissolve into the beer.

Once the iron in the yeast and the iron from the grains are all dissolved into the wort, iron levels may get high enough that it is detectable to the palate.

Water
Water also naturally contains iron, but again, at normal levels, even with the iron from the grains, the iron levels should remain low enough to be both helpful for fermentation and harmless to humans.

It would still serve brewers to check the iron levels in their water, however, particularly if the source of the water is a well or especially hard water.

Hard water can bring the overall pH of the wort up as well, which can cause an increase in oxidation and release the iron from the yeast cell walls, once again driving up the overall iron levels to detectable and higher levels.

Thus, brewers should check both iron levels and the pH of the water used in brewing.

The Container
Finally, and most commonly, excess iron can come from the container in which the wort is mashed. Most brewers today will use the classic copper kettle that is coated with a protective film so as not to leach any minerals into the brew.

But inexpensive, old, or damaged metal containers can often leak iron into the wort and drive up iron levels across the board.
 
Yep definitely metallic. Tastes like I've been handling copper coins and then putting my hands in my mouth. Not pleasant.

It's the same taste you get in your mouth when pregnant as well 😝

Nope I haven't really changed anything else about my brewing, apart from yeast dumping, but only because it's the first fermenter I've had that's allowed it.
Yikes. Did you taste the wort before fermentation, and if so did it taste OK then?
 
Just watched the David Heath video on GF30. In it he specifically says that you must clean thoroughly before first use to avoid metallic taste. I know you cleaned it, but perhaps it needed a super-super-clean?

Seems like too much of a coincidence to ignore.

I was going to brew today but now I'm gonna leave it until the weekend until I've got more time. I think the bottom part with the dump valve etc will be the hardest to clean. Might soak it in some purple stuff 🤣

Once I've cleaned it again I will brew my other recipe and if it happens again it must be the malt. I am starting to suspect the bottom tap bit as the culprit though at the moment. Not sure how I'm going to get inside it, apart from soaking it like I did last time.
 
Last edited:

Latest posts

Back
Top