question on using a digital refractometer

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hi everyone,
i have one of this type
IMG_7901.jpeg
work good.
but i heard once the ferment has started and finished it is hard getting a proper reading of SG! for all people say there’s formulas to work it out.
couldn’t get away on the Rspt pill and then Easydens costing a arm and a leg i was looking at one o these.
IMG_7899.jpeg
IMG_7900.jpeg
does these work (ok i see it’s brix) as in measuring SG during and after ferment unlike the 1st one?
thank for the help
Bri
 
Always been pleased with the ispindels,
I accept it's inaccurate with krausen and changes with pressure but shows the trend well. One that I use in wine is really accurate, but no krausen making wine and no pressure.

I use a Milwaukee and been delighted with it, but if the cheaper electronic ones were available I'd have given one a go.
I think this was discussed on US thread recently.
 
Last edited:
Always been pleased with the ispindels,
I accept it's inaccurate with krausen and changes with pressure but shows the trend well. One that I use in wine is really accurate, but no krausen making wine and no pressure.

I use a Milwaukee and been delighted with it, but if the cheaper electronic ones were available I'd have given one a go.
I think this was discussed on US thread recently.
+1 for the Milwaukee - great piece of kit and not too expensive.
 
Just searched on digital refractometers and prices seem to be in the £30-40 range or £300-400 range with nothing in between. What is the difference?
May stick with my hydrometer for Fg readings.
 
Milwaukee not that price delivered to new zealand looks about 180 pounds.

I use mine throughout the brew day and then always still compare to a hydrometer for OG and FG, but I don't know why I bother as it's always the same as the refractometer. My head seems to think it could have changed for some reason. I never checked the hydrometer each brew to ensure it was accurate.
The critical thing with small samples is to ensure that it is really well mixed before you take the sample. So good reading a big display and no real beer loss.
 
Whatever the type of refractometer, analogue or digital, once fermentation has started (and alcohol is present), you can only get SG (and ABV) from Brix, when you also know the OG.

You then use a calculator tool like (part Ii of)
https://www.brewersfriend.com/refractometer-calculator/
The wort correction factor (WCF) asked for, can adjust for varying ratios of different sugar types. But WCF = 1.04, is generally accepted to give good results, for most typical mashes.

Best ignore the refractometers SG scale (if it has one), except (maybe) for unfermented wort. But brewersfriend calculator, part I, does this conversion including the WCF.
I think refractomometers built in SG conversion usually assumes the only sugar is sucrose, (which would be WCF = 1.0)..

Mine's a £30 one, like pic 3. Seems fairly accurate (comparing conversion with good hydrometer). Only niggle recently, is that CAL sometimes gives a memory clear error message. I then have to manually deduct reading for cal water, (typically 0.3%), from the sample reading.

It's great for monitoring mash conversion, as small sample can quickly cool to room temp, (needed for taking a reading).

I usually then switch to a hydrometer for taking an OG and FG reading. But with last brew, a RIS needing several sugar additions during ferment, the refractometer has been handy for doing the multiple readings to check fermentation progress.
 
Last edited:
Always been pleased with the ispindels,
I accept it's inaccurate with krausen and changes with pressure but shows the trend well. One that I use in wine is really accurate, but no krausen making wine and no pressure.

I use a Milwaukee and been delighted with it, but if the cheaper electronic ones were available I'd have given one a go.
I think this was discussed on US thread recently.
well lads,
i had to google it, n by luck i got one from Evilbay, nearly half price.
Screenshot (387).jpg
cant wait lol.
Thanks again.
Bri
 
morning!
i started my going on in my dangeruss brian’s brewday thread!!
tbh intro 3 readers into a situation with only 3 🧠🥴cells to work with my heed was fragged, doesn’t help it was a busy brewday!
so like i said i’ll re-do my test agsin ova in that thread.
IMG_8952.jpeg
thought a starter was better than sugar solution! 🤔🫡
 
Whatever the type of refractometer, analogue or digital, once fermentation has started (and alcohol is present), you can only get SG (and ABV) from Brix, when you also know the OG.

You then use a calculator tool like (part Ii of)
https://www.brewersfriend.com/refractometer-calculator/
The wort correction factor (WCF) asked for, can adjust for varying ratios of different sugar types. But WCF = 1.04, is generally accepted to give good results, for most typical mashes.

Best ignore the refractometers SG scale (if it has one), except (maybe) for unfermented wort. But brewersfriend calculator, part I, does this conversion including the WCF.
I think refractomometers built in SG conversion usually assumes the only sugar is sucrose, (which would be WCF = 1.0)..

Mine's a £30 one, like pic 3. Seems fairly accurate (comparing conversion with good hydrometer). Only niggle recently, is that CAL sometimes gives a memory clear error message. I then have to manually deduct reading for cal water, (typically 0.3%), from the sample reading.

It's great for monitoring mash conversion, as small sample can quickly cool to room temp, (needed for taking a reading).

I usually then switch to a hydrometer for taking an OG and FG reading. But with last brew, a RIS needing several sugar additions during ferment, the refractometer has been handy for doing the multiple readings to check fermentation progress.
Whatever the type of refractometer, analogue or digital, once fermentation has started (and alcohol is present), you can only get SG (and ABV) from Brix, when you also know the OG.

You then use a calculator tool like (part Ii of)
https://www.brewersfriend.com/refractometer-calculator/
The wort correction factor (WCF) asked for, can adjust for varying ratios of different sugar types. But WCF = 1.04, is generally accepted to give good results, for most typical mashes.

Best ignore the refractometers SG scale (if it has one), except (maybe) for unfermented wort. But brewersfriend calculator, part I, does this conversion including the WCF.
I think refractomometers built in SG conversion usually assumes the only sugar is sucrose, (which would be WCF = 1.0)..

Mine's a £30 one, like pic 3. Seems fairly accurate (comparing conversion with good hydrometer). Only niggle recently, is that CAL sometimes gives a memory clear error message. I then have to manually deduct reading for cal water, (typically 0.3%), from the sample reading.

It's great for monitoring mash conversion, as small sample can quickly cool to room temp, (needed for taking a reading).

I usually then switch to a hydrometer for taking an OG and FG reading. But with last brew, a RIS needing several sugar additions during ferment, the refractometer has been handy for doing the multiple readings to check fermentation progress.
hallow m8.
it’s early, n my 3 🧠 cells are getting coffee intake!
you mentioned soon as alcohol in the beer you’ll have to do brix n calculation! what about the hydrometer that i’ve used ova 40 years brewing for specially OG! should of of used my alcohol hydrometers!!
🧠🤕🤔🤔🤔
nearly hit the BUY NOW (and my bum fell out!) for a Anton Parr Easy dens!!!
i’ll save up 😂
 

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