Radiator fitting advice

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SilverShadow

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Hi there guys...

This one's for all you budding Mario's & Plumbob Sqaurepants out there 😉

I've recently bought some new double panel radiators (Milano Aruba), and looking to try replacing them myself.

The old ones are mostly double panel, but fitted some while ago, and it appears at different times. The result is that each of the radiators & pipework are at different distances from the wall, depending on what the person was smoking that day! 😜

In most cases the pipes need shifting out 25-30mm, so they are 65mm from the wall. Im reluctant to mess too much with the existing pipework, and try to keep it fairly simple where possible.

I've come up with 2 solutions so far

1) create a pipe 'chicane' (see pic 1) - this will be easier to shuffle to fit, but will require draining the system / removing existing valves / cutting the pipework down to incorporate it

2) rotate the existing valves (see pic 2, and imagine 90' elbow is the valve pointing outwards), so that they aim either 45 or 90' outwards, then extend new pipes till they fit the 65mm distance, and add another 45 or 90'c elbow to run parallel to the wall.


3) or perhaps anyone knows of a simpler way, or piece if kit made just for this?

For the record, all new rads are at least 100mm shorter, so will be fitting extension tails (probably telescopic). Where possible l, I'd prefer to use olive compression fittings, rather than solder, unless anyone thinks otherwise?



Thanks for your help guys, and please feel free to ask questions. I may not always know the answer, so it may result in lots of 'thingamabub' type answers 😉

Cheers
Shadow
 

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Clint

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I'd get a man in. One thing I noticed when having rads changed in my house was that the existing pipe was imperial and the new metrical diameters so the plumber had to sort it out. Plus it would look an ar5e if I attempted it...
 

Buffers brewery

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Either way, I’d recommend cutting your existing pipe where it comes up from the floor and fitting a service valve so you can isolate the rad and valve if needed in the future. Saves having to drain the system down. You can the fit your new pipework from the service valve to the radiator valve.
 

SilverShadow

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I'd get a man in. One thing I noticed when having rads changed in my house was that the existing pipe was imperial and the new metrical diameters so the plumber had to sort it out. Plus it would look an ar5e if I attempted it...

I am seriously considering it, believe me! 😉

My only reservations are:
- I'm looking to do this on a budget, so can imagine it'd be £50+ per rad, which is another £400 to do them all
- we'd like to paint behind the rads, so replacments would be done in sections, rather than a plumber doing it all in 1 go
- I'm OK with DIY (done some basic plumbing before). While I've never done rads, I think I can do it with some basic tips

But whatever I do, I'll try 1 or 2 rads and make a decision from there 😉
 

SilverShadow

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Either way, I’d recommend cutting your existing pipe where it comes up from the floor and fitting a service valve so you can isolate the rad and valve if needed in the future. Saves having to drain the system down. You can the fit your new pipework from the service valve to the radiator valve.

That's my thinking too. Put isolation valves a few cm above the flooring at each end of the rad. Then I can fit my pipework however needs be and won't need to drain down each time 😁
 

SilverShadow

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Ps, I'm also thinking it's easier to:

1) Fit the rad against the wall first, then worry about adjusting the existing pipework to connect

rather than

2) trying to guess the right height to fit the new rad to be plumb with minimal/no existing pipe rework


The latter seems potentially much harder to get the new rad position 'mm perfect' to fit. Seeing as most pipes will need some adjustment, it makes sense (to me) to do the former option, as I'd imagine that way the rad is properly supported and not resting on the pipework 🤔
 

SilverShadow

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New radiators come with wall brackets that can be fitted to give two different distances from the wall.

That difference in radiator width is probably just right to fit a thermostatic valve between the pipe and the radiator.

Unfortunately I went down the awkward route 😜

Mine are oval panel rads with bespoke fittings, so I think I'm stuck with 65mm as fixed distance
 

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Buffers brewery

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Yes, hang radiator first then cut pipes to fit. If you've not taken a radiator out before be aware the "water" inside can be black. After draining the system there will be, depending how old the radiator is, black gunk in the bottom. So when you disconnect the rad from the valve make sure you've got a container underneath to catch any drops and turn the rad upside down (making sure bleed screws are tight) asap before you carry it out of the house.
 
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Unfortunately I went down the awkward route 😜

Mine are oval panel rads with bespoke fittings, so I think I'm stuck with 65mm as fixed distance
Never mind, it’s all doable if you have common sense and basic diy skills. You probably need tails for the radiators too, new radiators usually have a bleed valve and cap but not the tails. You can also buy tails that extend or tails that have integrated isolation valves.
 
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I'd get a man in. One thing I noticed when having rads changed in my house was that the existing pipe was imperial and the new metrical diameters so the plumber had to sort it out. Plus it would look an ar5e if I attempted it...

How sexist 😉

To be fair though, we had a lady chimney sweep round a couple of weeks ago which I'd never seen before.
 

allotment_fox

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One option for DIY which I used to fit a radiator toilet and hot cold to a basin , is Hang the Radiator take the pipework to the radiator if your not good with soldering an option is to use copper push fit check Screwfix / Toolstation pages worked for me but a bit pricey compared to solder joints
 

Chippy_Tea

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an option is to use copper push fit check Screwfix / Toolstation pages worked for me but a bit pricey compared to solder joints

A mate of mine had one of those shark bite type push fittings come off luckily it was in the kitchen so the flood that followed was not a major disaster I know people use them but I wouldn't have them in the house, imagine if that had been in the bathroom upstairs..
 

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