Bleach as a sanitiser.

Help Support The HomeBrew Forum:

foxbat

Junior Member
Joined
Nov 24, 2013
Messages
2,142
Reaction score
1,153
Location
Essex, UK
what is beer stone
Calcium Oxalate. Nasty, hazardous chemicals are often used to get rid of it. Prevention is better than cure - two of the minor ingredients in PBW (EDTA and the surfactant) are designed to bind with the ions that form beerstone, preventing it from forming.
 

Chippy_Tea

Administrator.
Administrator
Joined
Mar 17, 2013
Messages
29,368
Reaction score
6,921
Location
Ulverston Cumbria.
what is beer stone
Beerstone is an aggravating problem in a brewery because it is a stubborn blend of organic and inorganic compounds. Most brewers agree that the best practice is to avoid buildup by using proper cleaning techniques regularly. When beerstone does strike, however, modern brewers can now choose between traditional techniques and some new alternatives.

It’s the greyish-white layer of sediment on the inside of your fermentor. It stubbornly resists your best efforts to remove it. You’re about to climb inside the tank and spend the day with a scraper. It’s beerstone.
Scientifically speaking, beerstone is a precipitate of calcium oxalate and protein. All surfaces in the brewery that come into contact with wort and beer are susceptible to this deposit, but some of the biggest problems will occur in heat exchangers, fermentation vessels, aging tanks, kegs, and beer dispense lines. Some breweries only have to address the problem once or twice a year, but inadequate cleaning regimens can require more frequent attention.

https://www.morebeer.com/articles/removing_preventing_beerstone
 

Chippy_Tea

Administrator.
Administrator
Joined
Mar 17, 2013
Messages
29,368
Reaction score
6,921
Location
Ulverston Cumbria.
Ha. This debate is getting as entrenched as those about restoring capital punishment, Spurs v Arsenal and the dreaded "B" word. Each to his own, I say.
Hardly surprising when your first post in the thread was "Bleach is the best sanitiser there is. Don't waste your money on Starsan" you based this sweeping statement on a totally different product that didn't work for you why are you surprised members that use it and have had no problems with it have stood up for the product.
 

Clint

Hammered.....
Joined
Jun 29, 2016
Messages
8,882
Reaction score
4,613
Location
North Wales
No doubt bleach works providing you can pin down a consistent supply and properly mix it .. especially with vinegar.
With starsan I use one of those 5/2.5ml double ended spoon you get in kids medicines,fill each side and add 5 litres if water .. done. The spoon is left permanently in my solution in a spare fv with spare pipes etc. Same amount every time..easy.
 

Drunkula

Landlord.
Joined
Nov 30, 2017
Messages
1,894
Reaction score
1,366
In case anyone doesn't know if you're using the no-rinse bleach you've got to make it new every time, it's pretty much useless after 24 hours. I've even had it stored in demijohns and then found mould rafts living in it that look like dead mice.

And it seem counter-intuitive but diluted bleach is far, far more effective than neat. The pH neat is around 12 to keep it stable but lowering it makes it magnitudes more lethal - hundreds of times for acidified bleach.
 

DavidDetroit

Landlord.
Joined
Apr 7, 2017
Messages
827
Reaction score
313
Location
Detroit, MI
Some years ago, when I was given all the equipment to make beer, there was a half bottle of Starsan with it so I never considered another sanitizer. Then, after reading much on the sister site, I was scared away from bleach permanently because of the real or imagined risk of getting bleach into the beer. Technically, I don't know how well people follow directions regarding correct ratios when dealing with bleach so both Starsan and a bleach combo could be equal in effectiveness.
With Starsan, the initial cost is high but the bottle lasts for two years or more.
 

PJL

Active Member
Joined
Aug 20, 2019
Messages
22
Reaction score
10
Location
New Zealand
I've only ever used bleach, so far without any problems whatsoever. However I live so far away from a brew shop bleach is just an easy option and readily available from the local supermarket.
I've given up on bottles for the most part and use kegs so it's not as much of a neusense having to rinse.
 

Peter Scandlyn

Active Member
Joined
May 10, 2017
Messages
85
Reaction score
16
Location
NULL
@PJL same same, EXCEPT I still bottle, yet don't find it an issue (had about 38 years of practice tho'........)

Aside, notwithstanding the cost v. how long a bottle may last, I look at that product as a prime example of price gouging. (Not that they're alone in the home brew market in that aspect).
There are copycat products out there with same specs at half the price and I have homed in on a product that'll work for me IF I decide to change.
 
Top