JJSH's brewdays

Discussion in 'Beer Brewdays!' started by jjsh, Jan 14, 2018.

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  1. May 11, 2018 #41

    jjsh

    jjsh

    jjsh

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    Finally bottled the GW hop back summer lightning clone. Tasted fine, if a little thin. Had 3 weeks in the FV in the end. Might make a nice summer quencher.

    Oh, and I hate bottling still. Lol.
     
  2. May 16, 2018 #42

    jjsh

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    Put the Hop back Mild in a King Keg today. Its finished at an incredible 1004. Sample tasted good. Primed with unrefined dark sugar for a change ( i.e. its all we had in! ). There's a bit more on my blog if anyone's interested.
     
    Last edited: May 16, 2018
  3. Jun 29, 2018 #43

    jjsh

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    Today, I'm doing a Ron Pattinson beer form The Home Brewers Guide to Vintage Beer, 1864 Lovibond XB.
     
  4. Jun 29, 2018 #44

    jjsh

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    In the FV, all pitched, hit volume exactly (20L in FV) but overshot OG (1056 instead of 1052). More later...
     
  5. Jun 29, 2018 #45

    Clint

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    Don't you just love the word lovibond! Sounds like a thespian investment portfolio!
     
  6. Jun 29, 2018 #46

    jjsh

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    Sir John Betchimadeup said 'alas, after the great Scottish play accident of 1962, I was unable to work for a considerable period; fortunately, I was able to rely on an income from my Lovibonds'
     
  7. Jul 23, 2018 #47

    GerritT

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    My plan today/tomorrow! What yeast did you use? The yeast as advised or an alternative?
     
  8. Jul 23, 2018 #48

    jjsh

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    I made a couple of errors with this recipe. The first is that I'm relatively new to all grain brewing, and still don't trust my efficiency, which is usually (always) higher than Ron assumes in his book, so I got an OG of 1056. I really need to have the confidence to dial the grain bill down a bit when I am doing other people's recipes so as to try had get a similar OG.

    My second mistake was the yeast. I don't use liquid yeasts (yet) so plumped for 2 packets of Nottingham, pitched at 15 degrees and allowed to rise to 17 where it was held for fermentation. It still massively over attenuated; I got a FG of 1006! Should have used a different yeast.

    The good news is it tastes great, although not conditioned yet. It will be packaged into a King Keg this week.
     
  9. Jul 23, 2018 #49

    GerritT

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    I got an OG of 1059 so might be that our methods are more efficient. As it's over 23º now, only yeast I trust is S04. Hopefully next year I'll have a set of Kveiks as fallback.
    I found that his hops were on the mild side, not 5.5% as I had. So I reconfigured his early hops to give the IBUs, and kept the last hop gift to scale to meet the original recipe.
     
  10. Jul 23, 2018 #50

    jjsh

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    Yes, I had to adjust the hop schedule as I was using pellets, and also they had a higher AA count than in his book.

    As for temps, I have an inkbird controlled fridge so I can just dial in whatever temp I need. However, S04 is probably closer to the yeast he specifies than Notty, so you should be OK I reckon.
     
  11. Jul 23, 2018 #51

    MyQul

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    You need to remember notty attenuates to about 80% (thats what Ive found with it). I imagine for old beers of yore, the yeast would have what we would consider under attenuated rather than over. What yeast are recommended with this reciepe?
     
    Last edited: Jul 23, 2018
  12. Jul 23, 2018 #52

    MyQul

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    Notty has a MASSIVE temp range. I had it up to about 27C last summer as I had read it had a high temp tolerance so I tested it out. It can aslo ferment down to about 14C

    I'm going to try some keik, that danbriant sent me, in a bitter recipe tommorow (well actually I'm making the wort tommorow, then I'll pitch the yeast on wednesday because I'm no chilling, not that the wort will be that 'chilly' at ambient temps) . As the profile for the yeast sounds remarkably similar to a classic English Ale yeast. My kitchen floor brew corner is currently at 26C so should be pretty good for the kviek
     
  13. Jul 23, 2018 #53

    GerritT

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    Wyeast 1098 British Ale—dry or Wyeast 1099 Whitbread Ale. I thought of Notty too but I'd rather spend it on a brew when the temperatures are more moderate.
    No-chilling here too, I expect the wort to be around 25º in the morning. If I'm lucky.
    I was on an ale series (Greg Hughes) with CML but I'll finish the series in September.
     
  14. Jul 23, 2018 #54

    MyQul

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    They are the Whitbread A strain so if you used S0-4 (which is also supposed to be derived from the whitbread A strain) you should be ok as it can go up to 25C (according to the data sheet).
    If you happen to want to get your hands on the whitbread B strain, this is the Gales strain and you can get it from Gales HSB from ASDA (which is where I got it from)
     
  15. Aug 10, 2018 at 1:06 PM #55

    jjsh

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    Its a 'use stuff up' brew today. Brewing a Kentucky Common inspired brew, which has been anglicised with UK hops and grains. I'm using up my CML Californian yeast ~ hopefully, I'll get on with it better than the real ale and US ones.

    FERMENTABLES:
    2 kg - United Kingdom - Maris Otter Pale (41.7%)
    1 kg - United Kingdom - Lager (20.8%)
    1 kg - Flaked Corn (20.8%)
    0.5 kg - German - Vienna (10.4%)
    100 g - American - Black Malt (2.1%)
    100 g - United Kingdom - Crystal 60L (2.1%)
    100 g - Flaked Barley (2.1%)
    HOPS:
    10 g - Challenger, Type: Pellet, AA: 8.5, Use: Boil for 60 min, IBU: 11.68
    15 g - Challenger, Type: Pellet, AA: 8.5, Use: Boil for 30 min, IBU: 13.47
    20 g - Bramling Cross, Type: Pellet, AA: 6.5, Use: Boil for 5 min, IBU: 3.56


    Mash is on.....
     
  16. Aug 10, 2018 at 2:01 PM #56

    jjsh

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    mmmm.... interesting. This is looking very much like a brown ale, lol.
     
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  17. Aug 10, 2018 at 3:57 PM #57

    jjsh

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    Upped the 30 min Challenger hop addition to 22g as I didn't want 7g of broken pellets and dust hanging around.
     
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  18. Aug 10, 2018 at 5:33 PM #58

    jjsh

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    In the fermenting fridge, could on;y get the wort down to 32 deg, the fridge is working away doing the rest. Will pitch at 17.

    1046 OG, so lost a fair amount of efficiency somewhere. Interestingly, only a 60 instead of a 90 min mash that I usually do. The maris otter was fairly old as well. Still, if it finishes at 1010, it will be a pleasing 4.7% ish.

    Sample tastes really encouraging, lets see what the CML Californian yeast can do with this.
     
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  19. Aug 11, 2018 at 11:05 AM #59

    jjsh

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    Well, this is interesting. It's took off, with the Inkbird keeping the temp between 16 & 17. It must have been fairly vigorous, as it blew the top of the airlock off, but I've put it back on. Predictably, it isn't bubbling now but I can see activity. I think this is the air lock; the top part is too firm a fit so pressure builds up and it pops off.

    It looks to be a proper bottom fermenting yeat, which as I understand it, is correct for the style; I read somewhere that some of these supposed Cali common yeasts were top fermenting ale yeasts that just happened to be quite clean, which isn't what they would have used in the gold rush era; they would have been bottom fermenting lager yeasts that could tolerate the higher temps.

    Either way, all the activity appears in the lower paer of the fv with just a bit of crud on tye top.

    All very interesting.
     
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  20. Aug 13, 2018 at 1:47 PM #60

    jjsh

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    Ok, so it now has the usual, top fermenting krausen thing going on, so who knows. At least it's fermenting away happily!!
     
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