Flexible gas line.

Discussion in 'General Home Brew Equipment Discussion' started by Snoop, Mar 12, 2019.

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  1. Mar 12, 2019 #1

    Snoop

    Snoop

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    What do I need to buy to move from the usual 3/8 rigid gas line to the flexible tubing I always see the yanks using? The rigid stuff is just a massive pain in my fridge.

    It's all 3/8s to JG pushfit. Mostly cornies but a few Sankeys too. I gather I would need to replace the JG push pit with hose barbs for the flexible line? The regulator ends of the lines are all JG too, standard thread size for the regulators I think. Not sure what exact size but I have 3 regulators and all the JG fittings fit so guess it's fairly standard.

    Not entirely sure where to start. I see the stuff does exist but not sure what to buy and with what fittings :)

    Ta
    Si
     
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  2. Mar 12, 2019 #2

    foxbat

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    I'm moving to 3/16 for the short gas lines in my keezer build because of the flexibility issue. 3/16 JG connectors are only available as reducers from 3/8 so you do still need 3/8 fittings for the final endpoints with a small run of 3/8 to the reducer:

    Gas -> 3/8 -> 3/16 -> 3/8 -> keg
     
  3. Mar 12, 2019 #3

    Snoop

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    I use these for the beer lines and they work well. A bit slow but I can wait. wasn't sure if they were suitable for gas tho.
     
  4. Mar 12, 2019 #4

    LeeH

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  5. Mar 12, 2019 #5

    Ghillie

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  6. Mar 12, 2019 #6

    Snoop

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    Goin to 3/16 would work well. Can it hold reasonably high pressures? Sometimes I carb in bursts at 40psi. I never considered using the same setup as my beer lines for the gas.
     
  7. Mar 12, 2019 #7

    phildo79

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    I agree, it's a bit too rigid.
    @LeeH what size of that coiled stuff is required? And are any extra fittings required to use that stuff?
     
  8. Mar 12, 2019 #8

    Ghillie

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    Yeah it's fine. It'll be good for the same pressures that 3/8" can take.
     
  9. Mar 12, 2019 #9

    simon12

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    Since the beer out will be at the same pressure as the gas in I would assume it can take a similar pressure, many pubs serve everything at 35 psi as standard so an extra 5 would not be an issue.
     
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  10. Mar 12, 2019 #10

    simon12

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    Ghillie beat me to it.
     
  11. Mar 12, 2019 #11

    peebee

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    All my gas line is polyurethane. The aquarium bunch use it because it is good with CO2 (don't use silicone - leaks like a sieve). Those curly "pig tail" lengths look pretty good.

    I get all mine from Context Pneumatics along with the "KELM" fittings (which are a hell of a lot cheaper then JG, and made of metal too).

    I still use the rigid MDPE (polythene) stuff for beer-line.
     
  12. Mar 12, 2019 #12

    LeeH

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    I use 8mm as they were free to me but any smaller side is fine. You don’t need wide bore gas lines.

    Fittings are just normal push fits.
     
  13. Mar 12, 2019 #13

    phildo79

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    @LeeH So if I ordered the 8mm x 5mm that would suit my current set-up (refurb corny set-up from Malt Miller) and that would be it? Nothing extra? Because that would be class.
     
  14. Mar 13, 2019 #14

    Snoop

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    Good info here. On that curly pipe from eBay are you saying that works with JG 3/8 push fit connectors? As I already have lots of those attached to my disconnects. So sounds like a plan if that works
     
  15. Mar 13, 2019 #15

    Snoop

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    Those push fit connectors do look alot cheaper than JG ones. Which size do you use? The amount of them is a bit overwhelming and I'll probably order the wrong ones. Any idea which ones screw onto a corny disconnect and also into a regulator?
     
  16. Mar 13, 2019 #16

    peebee

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    Ah. Yes the choice is a bit over-whelming. But sizes are down to whatever you chose to connect: For hose I use 4mm ID (PU06/040B) for my feed lines (0-20psi) and 6mm ID for bus lines (3-5bar - the lines connecting primary to secondary regulators), simply so I don't mix them up (I don't fancy beer served at 5bar - 75psi). Threaded connectors always seem to be BSP from Kelm - I will normally chose 1/4" BSPP (parallel, there will also be BSPT, tapered, fittings). Very occasionally I use 1/8" BSPP. Fittings for Corny disconnects aren't by Kelm but Context Pneumatics sell them. The threaded disconnects are 1/4" MFL, or "flare". You don't look for these but for 7/16" JIC (confusing, but they are all US UNF threads at heart). I'm not sure if the mating "cone" on JIC and "flare" are the same (38 or 45 angle) but disconnects have plastic "cones" and the few brass "cones" I have seal faultlessly so doesn't really matter. You want part "2BJ0407" (for 1/4" BSPP) which you find here: https://www.contextpneumatics-catal...17167&level2=16869&level1=1&stockistown=False. Note the BSPP threads on these have no seal, you'll need a few wraps (7 is "standard") of PTFE tape on them.

    Hose is here: https://www.contextpneumatics-catal...3&level2=35072&level1=30062&stockistown=False. So 25m will last you sometime! But it's filthy cheap.

    I use the "finger-tight" fittings. They don't leak (pushfits do!). PDF attached.

    Here's some in action ("spunding" valves):
    20190115_200855_WEB.jpg
     

    Attached Files:

  17. Mar 13, 2019 #17

    Snoop

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    Thanks very much for this! I use the same secondary regulators and I like the way you have it right at the disconnect. That's a good idea.
     
  18. Mar 13, 2019 #18

    peebee

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    Don't be fooled by the piccie. I really do use the regulator (Shako NR200) as a spunding valve! There is 20L of fermenting beer in that keg (old piccie so that beer is being drunk now - still in the same keg - and another fermenting beer has taken its place).
     

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