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Golden Ale Recipe or Similar?

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davidgrace

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Does anyone have a Wainwright’s Golden Ale recipe or something similar? I am looking for Wainwright but I would be willing to try any English Golden Ale.
 

trueblue

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\this is a great golden ale. I don't buy it as an all grain kit just use the recipe with a better yeast. I brew it at least 3 times a year.
 

davidgrace

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You can get an all grain kit here, that handily has the complete recipe attached :laugh8:

WAINWRIGHTS GOLDEN ALE 23L ALL GRAIN RECIPE KIT | Worcester Hop Shop
Thanks for your response. I would like to brew this, but I am only equipped for 11.5L batches. The give the ingredients on their site, and the hop additions are useful, I can just half them as I always do with 23L recipes, but they do not give the timings. So, I am not totally sure which one is the bittering hop etc.
 

davidgrace

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You can get an all grain kit here, that handily has the complete recipe attached :laugh8:

WAINWRIGHTS GOLDEN ALE 23L ALL GRAIN RECIPE KIT | Worcester Hop Shop
Thanks for your response. I would like to brew this, but I am only equipped for 11.5L batches. The give the ingredients on their site, and the hop additions are useful, I can just half them as I always do with 23L recipes, but they do not give the timings. So, I am not totally sure which one is the bittering hop etc.
 

darrellm

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Thanks for your response. I would like to brew this, but I am only equipped for 11.5L batches. The give the ingredients on their site, and the hop additions are useful, I can just half them as I always do with 23L recipes, but they do not give the timings. So, I am not totally sure which one is the bittering hop etc.
Challenger is almost certainly the bittering hop. The way they've listed it with 2 mentions of Hallertau and Bobek suggests they've taken this from the instructions and just removed the timings, so I would suggest:

18.5g Challenger - 60min boil
21.5g Hallertau Hersbrucker - 60min boil
9.5g Bobek - last 10min of boil
21.5g Bobek - hop steep / dry hop
24.5g Hallertau Hersbrucker - hop steep / dry hop

This looks very similar to golden ale recipes I've done in the past, apart from the Hallertau additions: this could be worth a try.
 

davidgrace

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You can get an all grain kit here, that handily has the complete recipe attached :laugh8:

WAINWRIGHTS GOLDEN ALE 23L ALL GRAIN RECIPE KIT | Worcester Hop Shop
Challenger is almost certainly the bittering hop. The way they've listed it with 2 mentions of Hallertau and Bobek suggests they've taken this from the instructions and just removed the timings, so I would suggest:

18.5g Challenger - 60min boil
21.5g Hallertau Hersbrucker - 60min boil
9.5g Bobek - last 10min of boil
21.5g Bobek - hop steep / dry hop
24.5g Hallertau Hersbrucker - hop steep / dry hop

This looks very similar to golden ale recipes I've done in the past, apart from the Hallertau additions: this could be worth a try.
Thanks. Very helpful. I am willing to try this, but I have a reservation that you may be able to help me with. I saw a review of this kit that gave me the impression there wasn’t much bitterness and that made it true to the style. However, 18.5g Challenger - 60min boil and 21.5g Hallertau Hersbrucker – 60 minute boil may produce more bitterness than indicated in the review. I may, of course, be misinterpreting this as my knowledge is quite limited. I see that Hallertau Hersbrucker is only 2-4% Alpha Acid. What do you say?
 

darrellm

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The problem with trying to work out recipes is that the actual AA of hops can vary a lot. I've just received some Fuggles that were a disappointing 3.3% AA when my last batch from the same supplier was nearly 7%. Looking at Hallertau Hersbrucker, they can be in the range 2-5% which again is quite a variation, and Challenger can be 5-9%.

Plugging the figures for that recipe, at the low end of the AA ranges I get 16 IBU, whereas with the max AA figures I get 32 IBU: you can see the problem!

Even with the higher figures, that still feels a bit low for a Golden Ale: I normally aim for 35-37 IBU. Suggest using some brewing software and plugging in the figures for the actual hops you have, and aim for a total IBU around 35. The 10min addition won't add much. Have a play about with Brewers Friend https://www.brewersfriend.com/homebrew/recipe/calculator
 

davidgrace

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\this is a great golden ale. I don't buy it as an all grain kit just use the recipe with a better yeast. I brew it at least 3 times a year.
Thanks. I'm considering this Galaxy ale for a future brew. I only do 11.5L brew so I too will not buy the Malt Miller kit. Like you, I would like to use a different yeast. I use dry yeast and was wondering about fermentis S05. What do you think?
 

trueblue

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Thanks. I'm considering this Galaxy ale for a future brew. I only do 11.5L brew so I too will not buy the Malt Miller kit. Like you, I would like to use a different yeast. I use dry yeast and was wondering about fermentis S05. What do you think?
I only use liquid yeast so never tried SO5 if it's anything like SO4 I would avoid it. From what I do know about dried yeast something neutral like Nottingham may suit.
 

davidgrace

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I only use liquid yeast so never tried SO5 if it's anything like SO4 I would avoid it. From what I do know about dried yeast something neutral like Nottingham may suit.
S05 is usually used for the American IPA style to allow the hops to shine. Which liquid yeast did you use as an alternative to the one in the recipe?
 

trueblue

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S05 is usually used for the American IPA style to allow the hops to shine. Which liquid yeast did you use as an alternative to the one in the recipe?
I normally brew this recipe at least 3 times a year and have done for several years so have used several different yeasts. At the moment I drinking one brewed with Wyeast 1469 which is nice but slightly hazy. I know TMM describes this as an American beer but I tend to prefer the English ones with this beer. The only American one I tried is WLP041 Pacific ale yeast which was OK.
Galaxy is a fairly pungent hop and does not need help to shine through. WLP002 and WLP013 are the ones I have use most and the only one I would avoid is WLP023.
 

Tommo 2

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I normally brew this recipe at least 3 times a year and have done for several years so have used several different yeasts. At the moment I drinking one brewed with Wyeast 1469 which is nice but slightly hazy. I know TMM describes this as an American beer but I tend to prefer the English ones with this beer. The only American one I tried is WLP041 Pacific ale yeast which was OK.
Galaxy is a fairly pungent hop and does not need help to shine through. WLP002 and WLP013 are the ones I have use most and the only one I would avoid is WLP023.
For a dry yeast nowt Wrong with S05have used a lot with many hop forward fruity ipa s and have always had great success, I personally always rehydrate the yeast and always ferment at 20c for two weeks, really makes the hops shine.. only downside is the yeast doesn,t settle very firmly in the bottle after priming but I just chill them in the fridge for a few days and be more careful when pouring. Nottingham again is a very reliable yeast even at lower temperatures and ploughs through anything you put in front of it 🍻👍
 

moto748

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A coupe of questions if I may:

Firstly, "all grain" recipes: am I right in thinking this simply means, no sugar. I have noticed many (most?) if the recipes I have seen posted here don't include any sugar. I have not attempted to eliminate sugar altogether thus far, normally going with around 500 g of brewing sugar per batch of beer. I am aware that a lot of sugar can mean higher strength but lack of body, so I'm only using a modest amount. As I use a pretty low-tech method, is it worthwhile for me to attempt to eliminate sugar altogether?

Secondly, in the recipe in post #3 (and I've noticed this elsewhere) there is no mention of how much water.

Do these recipes work on a fixed, standard amount of water? If so, how much, please?
 

trueblue

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All grain means not an extract beer you can use sugar. Sugar does have a place in certain beers especially some traditional British and Belgium beer. Personally if I do use sugar I go for Invert sugar for British beers and Candi sugar for Belgium beers.
 
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