Partial mash / Partial boil step by step recipe

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clibit

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This will show you how to make 20 litres of a London Pride ale using a mixture of grains and extract, plus hops. You just need a 15L pot and a grain bag, and the usual kit brewing gear. You use extract to make up half the gravity, and grains the other half.

In a nutshell:
Mash your grains at 65*C using the grain bag in your pot, sparge the grains with enough water to make the volume up to about 11 litres and boil with hops, stir in your extract at the end and cool in the sink for a while (down to about 40C perhaps), then transfer to FV via a sterile sieve and top up to 20 litres with cold water.

Example

London Pride 20 Litres
OG 1048
Bitterness 33 IBUs
ABV 4.6%

Maris Otter 1500g
Dried Light Malt Extract 1400g
Crystal 400g
Black malt 50g

Target 10g 60 mins
Northdown 14g 15 mins
Challenger 14g 15 mins
Irish Moss 5g 15 mins

Method:

Mash: Soak all the grains in a fine mesh or nylon bag in 6 litres of water at 65*C for 45-60 mins. Keep the pot well wrapped to retain the temp.

Sparge: Remove the bag and either:
a) place the bag in another vessel in another 6 litres of water at about 75*C, leave for ten minutes and stir and then combine the two worts. Or
b) just lift the bag out of your pot and place on a colander over the pot. Pour hot water through the grains in the colander until you have 11-12 litres to boil. You could boil a kettle and then fill to almost the brim with cold water. Probably three times for about 6 litres. You will lose about 1 to 1.5 litres of water to the grain, soaked in. If you have a 15L pot, fill to about 2-3 inches from the top. You need to test that your cooker will boil this amount.

Boil: Bring wort to the boil and then add Target hops. You could use Admiral or Pilgrim hops instead. Or some Challenger or Northdown, and use 14g instead of 10g.

45 mins later add the 15 min hops and the Irish Moss

15 mins later switch off. Stir in the dried extract gradually.

Cool: Put the pot in cold water in the sink, change the water when it gets warm. Put the lid on when the temp gets down to 80C to protect against infection.

Transfer and pitch yeast: Pour the wort through a sterilised sieve into your sterilised FV. When the temp drops to 20*C take a hydrometer reading and pitch the yeast.

Adjusting Gravity: If the OG is below 1048 you could mix some DME with a little boiling water and add it to the FV. 100g DME will add about 2 gravity points in this 20 litre recipe, so for example would raise OG from 1045 to 1047. If you are over gravity, you can add some water.
 

cheshirehomebrew

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I might give that a go next time as am due to do either an IPA or a lager this week, I do love london pride though
 

clibit

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If you do, either buy the liquid yeast that is purported to come from Fullers, Whitelabs WLP002 or Wyeast 1968, or use a dried yeast that produces fruity esters, as Fullers yeast does. Safbrew S33 does, and so does Mauribrew 514 Ale yeast. The Mauribrew is less hassle in my experience, and makes a really nice ale, as the S33 often struggles to get below about 1018. I have pitched Gervin Ale yeast when this has happened to finish the job, and take it down to about 1010. And that has always produced a good result, so S33 is a good option, and it's cheap.
 

jtreach

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Hi there, thanks for this recipe. I'm keen to try it. Do you know of a good supplier where I can get all of this stuff (several seem to be missing one or two bits)?
 

MyQul

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Do you actually need to add the DME to the boil? I remember from my kit making days, I'd just put the DME in the FV with a couple of litres of boiling water, slosh it around to then add the kit. Could you do that with a partial mash brew too?
 

clibit

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Good spot MyQul. I would add it after the boil yes, either mix it in to the cooling beer in the boiling pot or in the FV.
 

Davdandy

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As a newbie please forgive my interruption here,but yesterday i saw a video on the grain method and saw how he boiled the mash for between and hour and an hour and a half.That seems a hell of a lot of electric to use for making a brew.Could i please ask what are your bills like doing this method.

I`m not a tight git but neither am i loaded, so just curious as to the costings.
 

Covrich

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As a newbie please forgive my interruption here,but yesterday i saw a video on the grain method and saw how he boiled the mash for between and hour and an hour and a half.That seems a hell of a lot of electric to use for making a brew.Could i please ask what are your bills like doing this method.

I`m not a tight git but neither am i loaded, so just curious as to the costings.
Just to clarify you heat the water firstly to about 70ºc before adding your grain to mash.. You will want the mash to remain around 66ºc for one our before removing the grain.. You don't boil the grain ( you may probably already know this but just thought I would check) after this and a sparge you then boil for usually 60 mins, depends on gas or electricity.. I have so far used gas hob and now a propane burner .. I am guessing very roughly it will be a few quid a brew but honestly cannot say.
 

clibit

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As a newbie please forgive my interruption here,but yesterday i saw a video on the grain method and saw how he boiled the mash for between and hour and an hour and a half.That seems a hell of a lot of electric to use for making a brew.Could i please ask what are your bills like doing this method.

I`m not a tight git but neither am i loaded, so just curious as to the costings.
It's not that much. I've just read a Which guide that says the cheapest gas cooker will cost about �£15 a year to run. That's for all your cooking, using the oven and the hob. A top of the range dual fuel cooker will cost around �£50 to run. That's using an electric oven.

I brew mostly 8-10 litre grain brews on my gas cooker hob, so it's a negligible expense. If you use a boiler with, say, a 3kw element, then you are using 3 kWh of electricity for every hour it's in use. I'm guessing maybe three hours for a 23 litre batch, so 9 kWh approx, maybe a quid? One kWh costs about 10p.

I've seen costings from people who use gas burners with gas bottles before and I think that's about �£2 a brew, something like that.
 

Davdandy

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Thanks guys.It is just something i wish to know beforehand.As we all know wages have stagnated or even gone down but fuel goes up and up.
 

ManseMasher

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Thanks guys.It is just something i wish to know beforehand.As we all know wages have stagnated or even gone down but fuel goes up and up.
That is true. But don't forget, your beer will cost roughly 40p a pint. How much do you pay for a pint in a pub, or even a can from a supermarket? So, 2 or 3 pints or cans not bought easily pays for your electricity/gas used.....
 

Budgie

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That is true. But don't forget, your beer will cost roughly 40p a pint. How much do you pay for a pint in a pub, or even a can from a supermarket? So, 2 or 3 pints or cans not bought easily pays for your electricity/gas used.....
Plus the added satisfaction of doing it yourself, and having a better beer than something out of a tin. :cheers:
 
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