Perceived Bitterness

Discussion in 'General Beer Brewing Discussion' started by rodwha, Mar 10, 2016.

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  1. Mar 11, 2016 #41

    rodwha

    rodwha

    rodwha

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    I've looked for other brewers nearby to do such testing with as my fermentation chamber is a smaller chest freezer (7 cubic feet) that houses my grains, whiskey, and cigars so I only have room for one fermentor at a time. Plus with the one temperature probe I couldn't gaurantee they'd all be the same temp.

    I have been quite interested in some form of experiment with that and utilizing hot peppers (roasted vs raw, and boiled vs extract).
     
  2. Mar 11, 2016 #42

    rodwha

    rodwha

    rodwha

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    Maybe I should go back to tubs of water and frozen water bottles or find a Belgian yeast I'd like.

    The question then would be how to accurately enough increase the bittering charge in the one lacking late boil hops.
     
  3. Mar 11, 2016 #43

    geetee

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    Hops also contain beta acid, as hops age the alphas are converted to beta acids. Beta acids themselves do not isomerise but have an inherent bitterness as they oxidise to give an altogether a more harsher bitterness due to their insolubility. The beta acids are brought into play during dry hopping and as you say during steep at less than boiling temperatures.
    The problem with this is two fold;
    They offer a harsher bitterness
    They cannot be properly quantified and their bitterness predicted in the same way that you can with alpha acid additions which are controlled by the boil.

    Beta acids are also responsible for a harsher bitterness in the beer as it ages, you lose the flavour but the oxidised harsher bitterness then can predominate as the beer gets older. I have definitely noticed this as my beers get older

    Maybe another good reason for hop tea additions to prevent harsher bitterness from heavy dry hopping for long periods?
     
    clibit and HebridesRob like this.
  4. Mar 11, 2016 #44

    clibit

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    That's really interesting thanks. Stuff to chew over.
     

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